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MATTHEW MANLEY

Clinical Assistant Professor

BIOGRAPHY

Matthew Manley is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Information & Operations Management Department of Mays Business School at Texas A&M University. He holds an MBA and PhD from Utah State University. His primary research interests are decision support systems with an emphasis on disaster management. More specifically, his work examines pedestrian crowd dynamics during large scale evacuations and the implications for individuals with disabilities.

Prior to joining Texas A&M University, Dr. Manley worked as a software engineer for a variety of companies in the technology, health care, and banking industries. His experience encompasses the design and development of both application and enterprise infrastructure software with a specialization in security. Dr. Manley is a Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP).

Dr. Manley currently teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses in the areas of information systems, software analysis and design, and data management.

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Decision Support Systems, Computational Modeling, Cybersecurity, Disaster Response and Recovery

RESEARCH

TITLE YEAR TYPE

Airport Emergency Evacuation Planning: An Agent-based Simulation Study of Dirty Bomb Scenarios

IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics: Systems

2015 Article

Agent-Based Evacuation Simulation for Individuals with Disabilities in a Densely Populated Sports Arena

International Journal of Intelligent Information Technologies

2012 Article

Modeling Emergency Evacuation of Individuals with Disabilities (Exitus): An Agent-Based Public Decision Support System

Expert Systems With Applications

2012 Article

Modeling Emergency Evacuation of Individuals with Disabilities in a Densely Populated Airport

Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board

2011 Article

Does The Use of Computer-Aided Learning Tools Affect Learning Performance?

International Journal of Innovation and Learning

2009 Article
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