Lead Story

Mays Professional MBA program exceeds national average in enrolling women

Dorian Martin, August 16th, 2018

The percentage of women enrolling in Mays Business School’s Professional MBA Program continues to grow in a sustained effort to increase the number of women leaders in the business world. Over the first five years of the program, female students made up on average 22 percent of each cohort, with a high of 31 percent and a low of 14 percent. The enrollments of the two most recent cohorts (Classes of 2019 and 2020) average 40 percent women, exceeding the national average of 36.8 percent.

This increase is part of the Professional MBA Program’s effort to fulfill Mays Business School’s mission to advance the world’s prosperity. A Morgan Stanley analysis points out that having more gender diversity in businesses results in increased productivity and innovation, better products and decision-making, and higher employee retention and satisfaction. However, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, women – who make up almost half of the U.S. workforce – comprise only 27 percent of chief executives and 27 percent of computer and information systems managers. Furthermore, 24/7 Wall Street found that only 14 of the top 234 companies that own many of the world’s top brands had a female CEO; nine of these companies did not have a woman serving in an executive position or on the board. …Read more

For 50 years Mays Business School has developed leaders who provide business solutions to solve the world’s problems in business, education, research, law, military, not for profit, government, and more. Mary Lea McAnally, former Director of Innovation and Strategic Planning and current PwC Professor in Accounting, was integral in developing the Mays Strategic Plan, vision, and mission that has allowed Mays to continue to innovate and respond to a changing world.

During Mays’ 50th Anniversary Celebration Sept. 7-8, McAnally articulated why a refined vision of leadership is needed, what the Mays Transformational Leaders initiative is all about, and how Mays is bringing this idea to students to develop them as MTL.

Why is a refined vision of leadership needed?

There are four forces of change that are distinct to our time: technology, a global economy, digitization/big data, and climate change.

McAnally explained that these forces of change created a new landscape of business known as VUCA:

  • Volatile: subject to frequent rapid, significant change. The volatility of today is a brutal increase in the type, speed, volume, and scale of change.
  • Uncertain: unpredictable. The past can longer predict the future.
  • Complex: multiplicity of issues and factors. The world is much more complicated due to increased globalization and digitization.
  • Ambiguous: lacks clarity. A global community signifies there may be multiple meanings and blurry understanding of situations.

“Mays Business School has to prepare leaders to lead in a VUCA world,” said McAnally. “What’s got us here is not going to get us there. Our traditional business and leadership models need to be revamped.”

What is the Mays Transformational Leaders initiative all about?

“We need leaders who are agile, flexible, adaptable, and creative,” said McAnally. “We need leaders who think before they do. We need leaders who have high emotional and social intelligence. And above all, we need leaders who welcome change, embrace change, and make change a part of their leadership practice.”

Mays Transformational Leaders inspire and influence others toward a common vision. They courageously challenge the status quo to create sustainable value and positive social impact. They also foster the development of self and others through reflective learning. In short, McAnally explained, Mays Transformational leaders transform organizations, others, and themselves.

How is Mays bringing this idea to students to develop them as MTL?

In order for Mays graduates to be transformational leaders in a VUCA world, Mays has developed a Strategic Learning Framework that includes

  • Business acumen: the business knowledge that students gain. This includes a holistic view of enterprise, functional area expertise, and technical skills.
  • Core competencies: practical skills needed for business and life. This includes communication, collaboration, leadership, critically thinking, acting ethically, managing people and projects, and creating opportunities.
  • Mindsets: the way you think, and the questions you habitually ask. This includes mindsets that are ethical, entrepreneurial, analytical, global, systems thinking, inclusive, and focused on social impact.

Mays has excelled in teaching business acumen and developing core competencies over the last 50 years, McAnally said. “It’s the mindsets that are really requiring us to be innovative and creative in our classrooms,” said McAnally. “Mindsets can’t be taught. They can be developed, but, most importantly, they are cultivated.”

Faculty members introduce these mindsets at the outset of the students’ freshmen year and continue to repeat them throughout a student’s time at Mays. These mindsets must be cultivated through experience, so experiential learning is key. McAnally provided some examples that Mays faculty members employ:

  • Class discussions
  • Case studies
  • Role playing
  • Simulations and video gaming
  • Consulting projects
  • Integrated business experience (IBE)

To wrap up her presentation, McAnally led the room in a reflective learning exercise that surfaced the participants’ own leadership strengths, behaviors, and skills, which McAnally then aligned with Mays Strategic Learning Framework. Noting the increase in the decibel level in the room during the activity, McAnally mentioned that students are just as engaged and voluble when they participate in experiential learning.

“It takes a village to raise a child,” said McAnally. “It takes an entire business school to develop a leader. Fortunately, the students who are walking through our doors are ready for it. They are going to release a fury of transformation on the world.”

Categories: Accounting, Faculty, Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Spotlights, Texas A&M

One year later, Texas is still bouncing back from the historic and catastrophic Hurricane Harvey. A group of Aggies is helping the recovery continue.

The Category 4 storm touched the Texas Gulf Coast on Aug. 25th, 2017, bringing winds up to 130 miles per hour, which led to the destruction of many houses and buildings in the Houston area. Harvey lingered over Houston for four days.

Last year, a grassroots organization made up of Texas A&M University students came together to collect relief supplies for those affected by the storm. They called on the Aggie community, and donations filled an 18-wheeler and four moving trucks with approximately 1,000 cases of water, 350 boxes of food, diapers, toiletries, air mattresses, and other items. In addition, the students were able to raise $30,000 for the American Red Cross as well as attract Aggie alumnus and Denver Broncos superstar Von Miller to captain the initiative. He donated $100,000 toward the group effort. …Read more

Categories: Featured Stories, News, Selfless service, Spotlights, Students, Texas A&M

Bruce D. Broussard ’84 has been selected as a laureate of the 2018 Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Ripple of Hope Award. The accounting and finance graduate will accept the award at the Ripple of Hope Awards Dinner in New York on Dec. 12. His fellow laureates include President Barack Obama, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy, and Discovery President and CEO David Zaslav.

The Ripple of Hope Award Award celebrates influential leaders from all communities who are committed to social change, equality, justice, and basic human rights. Past laureates include President Bill Clinton, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Bono, George Clooney, and Vice President Al Gore.

“I’m honored to receive the Ripple of Hope Award,” said Broussard in an article from GlobeNewswire. “Robert F. Kennedy inspired our nation to rededicate itself to social and economic justice for all Americans, and that critical work continues today.” …Read more

Categories: Alumni, Former Students, Health Care, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M

Mays Business School at Texas A&M University and health and well-being company Humana Inc. (NYSE: HUM) are launching the Humana-Mays Health Care Analytics 2018 Case Competition to showcase students’ analytical abilities to solve a real-world business problem. The case competition is open to all accredited colleges in the United States.

Students enrolled full-time in accredited Master of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Information Systems, Master of Public Health, or Master of Business Administration programs at an educational institution based in the United States are eligible to enter. Students are invited to join in groups of two to three students—from the same school—to tackle a real-world case that will be announced in September.

“We’re proud to host one of the top national competitions known for attracting the brightest MS/MBA students in the country to use data analytics in solving a real-world business problem in health care,” said Eli Jones, dean of Mays Business School.

The prizes for the winning teams have been significantly increased this year to $20,000 for first place, $10,000 for second place, and $5,000 for third place.

“Emerging technologies and richer analytics will continue to create new opportunities and change the way many industries do business, especially health care,” said Humana President and CEO Bruce Broussard. “We’re excited to partner once again with Texas A&M, my alma mater, on this challenge and help students develop the leadership skills needed to thrive during transformative times.”

The teams will be judged based on the following criteria:

  • Ability to establish key performance indicators aligned to business needs
  • Quantitative analysis identifying key business insights
  • Ability to provide unique insights for business improvements
  • Professionalism and visualization skills

In 2017, more than 300 master’s degree candidates representing 109 teams from 19 major universities in the U.S. registered for the competition. Students Hongxia Shi, Shenyang Yang, and Xiangyi Che from Purdue University received the top prize.

Key dates for 2018 participants include:

  • Sept. 12: Virtual kickoff for prospective participants
  • Sept. 18: Team submissions due (2-3 members from same school)
  • Sept. 26: Pre-submission workshop for participants
  • Oct. 10: Completed team analysis due
  • Nov. 14: Final presentations to executive panel at Mays Business School’s CityCentre Houston location; winners announced

For more information and complete rules, visit HumanaTAMUAnalytics.com.

 

About Mays Business School

At Mays Business School, we step up to advance the world’s prosperity. Our mission is to be a vibrant learning organization that creates impactful knowledge and develops transformational leaders. Mays Business School educates more than 6,400 undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing, and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its programs and for faculty research.

 

About Humana

Humana Inc. is committed to helping our millions of medical and specialty members achieve their best health. Our successful history in care delivery and health plan administration is helping us create a new kind of integrated care with the power to improve health and well-being and lower costs. Our efforts are leading to a better quality of life for people with Medicare, families, individuals, military service personnel, and communities at large.

To accomplish that, we support physicians and other health care professionals as they work to deliver the right care in the right place for their patients, our members. Our range of clinical capabilities, resources and tools – such as in-home care, behavioral health, pharmacy services, data analytics and wellness solutions – combine to produce a simplified experience that makes health care easier to navigate and more effective.

More information regarding Humana is available to investors via the Investor Relations page of the company’s web site at www.humana.com, including copies of:

  • Annual reports to stockholders
  • Securities and Exchange Commission filings
  • Most recent investor conference presentations
  • Quarterly earnings news releases and conference calls
  • Calendar of events
  • Corporate Governance information

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Media contact: Kelli Reynolds, Mays Business School, (979) 845-3167, kreynolds@mays.tamu.edu.

Categories: Dean Eli Jones, Former Students, Health Care, Mays Business, Texas A&M, Uncategorized

Mays graduate Charles L. Pence ’51 has been recognized as one of the 10 recipients of the 2018 Distinguished Alumnus Award. This is the highest honor that can be bestowed upon a former student of Texas A&M University. A full list of the recipients is available from the Association of Former Students. 

The Association of Former Students will further honor all recipients of this award during its annual Distinguished Alumni Gala on Oct. 5. For information about the gala, go to this page or contact Hannah Johnston ’11, Director of Events, at 979-845-7514 or Gala@AggieNetwork.com. In addition, the 2018 recipients will be recognized during the Oct. 6 Texas A&M football game against Kentucky.

Charles L. Pence ’51

Pence served in Korea and Japan in the Army, then began a 27-year career at ExxonMobil, becoming senior vice president of Exxon’s Friendswood Development Co. and developing Houston area’s first master-planned community, Clear Lake City. As president of Battlement Mesa Inc., he managed the construction of a new town, Battlement Mesa, near Grand Junction, Colo., to house employees of Exxon’s mining operation.  Upon retiring from Exxon in 1982, he co-founded Jefferson Development Co., serving as CEO for 12 years; was co-founder and chairman of Entouch Systems for five years; chairman of SiEnergy LLC for 10 years; and is co-founder and chairman of Si Environmental LLC. He has long supported Corps of Cadets scholarships, and his service to his communities includes chairing the transportation committee of the Houston Chamber of Commerce; serving as co-founder and president of the state’s nonprofit Grand Parkway Association developing an outer loop around Houston; and helping start University Baptist Church in Clear Lake City and Grace Fellowship Church in Lampasas.

About the award

Since the inception of the award in 1962, only 281 of Texas A&M’s 488,500 former students have been recognized with the Distinguished Alumnus Award. Awarded jointly by the university and The Association, this honor recognizes those Aggies who have achieved excellence in their chosen professions and made meaningful contributions to Texas A&M University and their local communities.

“The 2018 Distinguished Alumni are emblematic of the goals and missions of the university,” said Texas A&M University President Michael K. Young. “We encourage our students to take the Aggie core values into the world and make it a better place through achievement, leadership, and service. This group of individuals includes leaders from different fields who have done just that, contributing to our state, nation, and world outstandingly in the military, business and industry, architecture, entertainment, public policy and higher education. Although they traveled different paths after graduation, what they all have in common is their enduring love and support of Texas A&M, and for that their fellow Aggies are grateful.”

The recipients learned of their honor when surprised in their places of business and other locations by university and Association representatives, including Young, The Association of Former Students’ 2018 Chair of the Board of Directors Jimmy Williams ’83, Ph.D., Association President and CEO Porter S. Garner III ’79, Texas A&M Foundation President Tyson Voelkel ’96, and a Ross Volunteer, along with university mascot Reveille IX and her handler.

Williams said, “Our 2018 Distinguished Alumni are innovators, achievers, leaders and selfless servants. They exemplify our core values of excellence, integrity, leadership, loyalty, respect and selfless service, and I am inspired by the way they represent our Aggie Network.”

Garner echoed the sentiments of Young and Williams and offered his congratulations on behalf of The Association of Former Students.

“The Distinguished Alumnus award is the highest honor bestowed upon a former student of Texas A&M, and fewer than one-tenth of 1 percent of our former students have been recognized as such,” Garner said. “Our 2018 recipients are most deserving of this honor and demonstrate the wide-ranging impacts of the Aggie Network on our society.”

 Nominations for the 2019 Distinguished Alumnus Award will be accepted through Oct. 7 at tx.ag/DAnominations.

Categories: Alumni, Featured Stories, Former Students, Mays Business, News, Spotlights, Texas A&M

The Mays’ MS Business program gives students who completed an undergraduate degree in a non-business field an opportunity to develop the necessary skills to be successful in the business world. For Bailey Glenewinkel and Ryan Wendt, it has been a game-changing opportunity.

What started as a group project in the MS Business program is now a career for Bailey Glenewinkel. Bailey, a competitive shotgun shooter armed with an undergraduate degree in Agriculture Business, had a yearning to pursue entrepreneurship. While searching for ways to create her own business, a class within the MS Business program gave her the opportunity she was looking for. In the Integrated Business Experience course (IBE), students create a business and organize a service entity that will enable them “to learn business by doing business.” The business that Glenewinkel and her team created, SKNZ Studios, has become her full-time job.

Ryan Wendt was also a part of the first MS Business class in 2017. Before he was admitted into the program, Wendt completed his undergraduate degree in genetics, but was looking to obtain core business knowledge and skills. After completing the MS Business program, Wendt went to work for Keyence and has found success in his role – and was recently named “Employee of the Month” for June 2018.

Mays Business School offers this 36-credit hour program as a single-cohort, action-based, purposely-designed curriculum intended to help students develop core business acumen, cultivate leadership skills, and dynamically enhance professional marketability in an increasingly competitive job market. The MS Business program is 11 months long and is designed for students with less than 12 months of work experience after completing their undergraduate degree. Students coming directly from their undergraduate degree programs can earn their bachelor’s and master’s degrees in five years.

Note: The MS Business application process will start on Sept. 4.

 

Categories: Entrepreneurship, Featured Stories, Mays Business, MS Business, News, Spotlights, Students, Texas A&M

The percentage of women enrolling in Mays Business School’s Professional MBA Program continues to grow in a sustained effort to increase the number of women leaders in the business world. Over the first five years of the program, female students made up on average 22 percent of each cohort, with a high of 31 percent and a low of 14 percent. The enrollments of the two most recent cohorts (Classes of 2019 and 2020) average 40 percent women, exceeding the national average of 36.8 percent.

This increase is part of the Professional MBA Program’s effort to fulfill Mays Business School’s mission to advance the world’s prosperity. A Morgan Stanley analysis points out that having more gender diversity in businesses results in increased productivity and innovation, better products and decision-making, and higher employee retention and satisfaction. However, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, women – who make up almost half of the U.S. workforce – comprise only 27 percent of chief executives and 27 percent of computer and information systems managers. Furthermore, 24/7 Wall Street found that only 14 of the top 234 companies that own many of the world’s top brands had a female CEO; nine of these companies did not have a woman serving in an executive position or on the board. …Read more

Categories: Diversity and Inclusion, Featured Stories, Mays Business, MBA, News, Spotlights, Students, Texas A&M

Retailers are stocking fewer goods on their shelves, but have companies taken inventory reduction too far? A number of academic studies of U.S. retailers have revealed an overall decrease in product inventories.

Rogelio Oliva and Gregory Heim, professors in the Department of Information & Operations Management at Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School, are two of the researchers behind a study that examines this issue using data from 114 U.S. retailers during 2000 to 2013. …Read more

Categories: Center for Retailing Studies, Centers, Faculty, Featured Stories, Marketing, Mays Business, News, Research, Texas A&M

If you entered the Grand Stafford Theater on the evening of August 13, you would have been surrounded by some of the biggest proponents of entrepreneurship in Bryan/College Station. Business owners, Texas A&M University faculty, and members of local agencies such as the Brazos Valley Economic Development Corporation came together around one common interest: Startup Aggieland.

The McFerrin Center for Entrepreneurship hosted the Startup Aggieland Reveal Party after hinting that those in attendance would have a chance to “meet the new Startup Aggieland.” Attendees were treated to canapés provided by Chef Tai Lee and enjoyed the industrial-chic atmosphere of the historic downtown Bryan concert venue. Conversations drifted among clusters of attendees, each of them buzzing about what exciting new plans the McFerrin Center had in store for Startup Aggieland. …Read more

Categories: Centers, Entrepreneurship, Faculty, Featured Stories, Mays Business, McFerrin Center for Entrepreneurship, News, Spotlights, Staff, Startup Aggieland, Texas A&M, Uncategorized

Chelsea Anderson recently traveled with 42 other members of the Professional MBA Class of 2019. Stops included Johannesburg and Cape Town, South Africa.

July 30, 2018:

Every so often in life, an opportunity arises that cannot be missed. For me, that opportunity is the international trip with my Professional MBA program at Texas A&M University. Each cohort is able to select their trip destination and my class picked South Africa. I’ve only been here three days and I can already say that we couldn’t have come to a better place.

As I begin my trip, a recurring thought has been: why am I here?Arvind Mahajan, associate dean of graduate programs, put it best when he asked us to reexamine our own biases and integrate this information to determine: What is my truth? Sunday provided our first chance to determine our truth when we attended the Apartheid Museum and afterward visited the Kliptown township in Soweto. We spent time at the Kliptown Youth Program which provides much-needed education and computer training for the youth of the township. We even got to play a quick soccer game with the KYP students.

…Read more

Categories: Featured Stories, Mays Business, MBA, News, Spotlights, Students, Texas A&M