The new Mays Innovation Research Center has an inaugural director: Mays Business School professor Korok Ray, who conceptualized the center as a place to discover how and when innovation occurs, then transfer that knowledge to Texas A&M University students.

Ray, an associate professor of accounting, will lead the center to provide research support to existing and new faculty members across the Texas A&M campus. It will bridge the research at Mays with that occurring in engineering, business, liberal arts, and other academic disciplines. The center will also fund Ph.D. fellowships and undergraduate research opportunities, and award prizes for outstanding research that advances the center’s mission.

Ray’s research interests are performance measurement, compensation, corporate governance, and cost allocation. He has taught accounting at Texas A&M University, the University of Chicago and Georgetown University, and earned his Ph.D. from Stanford University. He also served as the senior economist on the Council of Economic Advisers in the White House from 2007 to 2009.

Ray said he has experienced strong support for the concept. “Dean (Eli) Jones, The Texas A&M Foundation, and our donors have been outstanding in their support of this vision from the beginning,” he said. “I’m thrilled and honored to lead this center into new and uncharted territory, as the conversation on innovation unfolds both on our campus and nationally.  The center will engage students in research, support faculty, and pursue opportunities unique to Texas A&M, with its special combination of first-tier research and first-class values.”

…Read more

Categories: Accounting, Centers, Dean Eli Jones, Entrepreneurship, Faculty, Featured Stories, Mays Business, Mays Innovation Research Center, News, Research, Texas A&M

The McFerrin Center for Entrepreneurship at Mays Business School reflects the values of excellence revered by its namesake – Artie McFerrin, a long-time supporter of Texas A&M University and the name behind the $10 million gift that secured the center’s future.

An intimate group that included Artie McFerrin’s wife Dorothy, their daughter Jennifer, and a gathering of family, friends and university leaders attended a recent reception to celebrate the official naming of the center. The event at the Founders Club at Kyle Field served as a tribute to Artie McFerrin, and a thank-you to his family, who have supported Texas A&M for years.

Dorothy and Artie McFerrin Jr. ’65 (2016 photo)

“If you strive for success, if you dream of venturing into the unknown and emerging smarter and stronger, if you want to grow yourself so you can grow others, you not only have a place to go, but also a name forever attached to it,” Tyson Voelkel, president of the Texas A&M Foundation, said at the event.

The center, which serves more than 3,000 students and more than 1,000 former students through 27 programs, is an international leader in entrepreneurial education. It aims to enhance entrepreneurial student education by providing training, networking, and assistance to enterprising students, faculty and alumni. With the support of a volunteer network, corporate supporters, faculty, and staff, the McFerrin Center has been able to provide business start-up acceleration, competitive opportunities, work experiences, and financial support to aspiring entrepreneurs in the Aggie community and across the world.

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Categories: Centers, Dean Eli Jones, Donors Corner, Featured Stories, Management, Mays Business, McFerrin Center for Entrepreneurship, News, Programs, Selfless service, Startup Aggieland, Texas A&M

David Williams ’79, Chairman of the Board, President, and CEO of Noble Corporation PLC, kicked off the Mays Transformational Leaders Speaker Series with an overview of his industry and some advice for Aggies. He spoke to MBA students, undergraduate students, and faculty and staff members.

Mays Dean Eli Jones said when introducing Williams that he was a good fit for the series. “A Mays transformational leader is someone who has an ethical mindset, a global mindset, is analytical, and has the ability to embrace change and to try new things,” he said. “That’s what you are, Mays students, and that’s what Mr. Williams is. He is one of us.”

Williams obtained his bachelor’s degree in marketing at Texas A&M University. He was selected one of Mays’ Outstanding Alumni in 2009 for his career achievements, as well as his service and dedication to Texas A&M. His first job out of college was in a shipyard in 1979, and he has been in the offshore drilling service industry since 1981.

“I have traveled just about everywhere except Antarctica, and I wouldn’t trade my job for anything,” Williams said.  “It’s hard sometimes, it’s volatile sometimes and our work is complex, but our business model is really pretty simple:  We punch holes in the ground for money – that’s it. Our oil company clients hire us to drill wells below the oceans of the world for a fee.” …Read more

Categories: Alumni, Dean Eli Jones, Energy, Featured Stories, Marketing, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M

To honor the Mays students who received scholarships for the 2017-2018 academic school year and thank their generous donors, Mays Business School hosted the 2017 Scholarship Banquet Nov. 2 in the Hall of Champions at Kyle Field.

More than 700 scholarships totaling more than $5 million were given to Mays students for the fiscal year 2017. Mays donors support a total endowment of more than $22 million.

The night started with a welcome reception, providing students the chance to formally introduce themselves to their donors, peers, and Mays faculty and staff members. These introductions turned into in-depth conversations during dinner – discussions about the impact attending Mays and receiving a scholarship has had on the students’ education at Texas A&M University.

Spencer Sullivan ’18, a student who is graduating with a finance degree in December, has benefitted from the Gary Neale Reger Scholarship Fund/CED for his entire college career. He said the financial support has allowed him to concentrate on his studies and pursue immersive study-abroad opportunities. …Read more

Categories: Dean Eli Jones, Donors Corner, Mays Business, News, Spotlights, Students, Texas A&M

The fastest-growing Aggie-owned or Aggie-led businesses were recognized Friday night at the 13th Annual Aggie 100 at a dinner hosted by the Texas A&M Mays Business School’s McFerrin Center for Entrepreneurship. Members of the exclusive club were honored by about 700 attendees at a dinner at the Hall of Champions at Texas A&M University’s Kyle Field.

The company with the highest growth was Lonquist Field Services (Canada), which reported a growth of 223.287 percent. It is owned by Richard R. Lonquist ’87, Roy W. Duff ’85 and Robert S. Crews ’90.

The complete Aggie 100 list may be found at www.aggie100.com.

To be considered for the Aggie 100, companies (corporations, partnerships, sole proprietorships) must operate in a manner consistent with the Aggie Code of Honor and in keeping with the values and image of Texas A&M University, and must meet specific criteria.

…Read more

Categories: Alumni, Centers, Dean Eli Jones, Entrepreneurship, Featured Stories, Former Students, Mays Business, McFerrin Center for Entrepreneurship, News, Texas A&M

The Executive MBA program at Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School maintains its place among the top 10 programs offered exclusively by U.S. public universities in the U.S., according to the 2017 rankings released Monday by Financial Times.

“We are proud to be ranked as a top public Executive MBA Program in the state of Texas and a Top 10 public program in the nation,” said Eli Jones, dean of Mays Business School. “This significant achievement reflects the strength and dedication of the Mays Business School faculty and staff to create visionary leaders. Mays is making a positive impact on the communities we serve through the strong accomplishments of our seasoned executives.”

This year’s rankings are based on feedback from the Class of 2014. The Mays Executive MBA Program ranked 10th among public schools located exclusively in the U.S and in the Top 25 among all public/private schools in the U.S.

In addition, the Mays program ranked 1st in work experience among U.S. public institutions (2nd among public/private). It has developed a reputation for attracting seasoned talent as well as high performers identified by their organizations.

Mays fared well in the 2017 Financial Times rankings in other areas as well. Based on the research productivity in the top journals in business, Mays faculty ranked 7th among U.S. public schools and 14th among U.S. public/private.

For nearly 20 years, Mays has offered its top-ranked Executive MBA in Houston. The two-year program meets on alternating weekends in Houston – leaving students time for important work-life balance. In class, students learn from faculty experts at Mays who are renowned for their research and passionate about teaching.

“We are proud to be the only school in Houston to be ranked by Financial Times. Through our program, students become better decision makers and gain the confidence for top leadership positions,” says Julie Orzabal, program director.

 

 

Categories: Alumni, Dean Eli Jones, Featured Stories, Mays Business, MBA, News, Staff, Texas A&M

Mays Business School’s Full-Time MBA program ranked in the top 10 among U.S. public programs at 7th among U.S. public schools and 20th overall in the 2017 Forbes “Best Business Schools” ranking. This reflects an improvement of four positions in the overall rankings and two positions in the U.S. public universities from the ranking in 2015.

The Forbes ranking reflects return on investment – the salary alumni earn over five years as compared to the cost of the MBA program. The results are based on a comparison of alumni earnings in their first five years out of business school to their opportunity cost. To learn more about the ranking and methodology, visit https://www.forbes.com/business-schools/.

The Mays MBA Program is considered a leader in academics and in return on investment. In addition, Forbes ranks Texas A&M’s Mays Business School as 1st in all U.S. schools in years to payback – at 3.6 years. The accelerated pace of the 18-month Full-Time MBA program and Mays’ commitment to providing competitive scholarships result in a high-caliber MBA education at an affordable cost.

“This is a confirmation of the commitment to excellence by our MBA faculty, staff, students, and former students,” said Eli Jones, dean of Mays Business School. “The lessons learned at Mays are priceless, and the specific skills are organic to each class.”

He added: “I know the impact the program makes on lives. The Mays MBA Program certainly transformed my life.”

Shannon Deer, director of the Full-Time MBA Program, echoed his sentiment. “The decisions we make on a day-to-day basis are gauged upon whether they provide value to the students and the employers who hire them,” she said. “The MBA program is a key element in the vibrant learning organization that is Mays Business School.”

Texas A&M University President Michael K. Young added his congratulations to the Mays Full-Time MBA Program for continuing an upward trajectory. “The feat of holding a top-10 spot is not an easy one,” he said. “Mays Business School is striking the balance of growing our future leaders while offering an excellent education at an affordable cost.”

About Mays Business School

Mays is a full-service business school that steps up to advance the world’s prosperity. Our mission is to be a vibrant learning organization that creates impactful knowledge and develops transformational leaders. Mays Business School educates more than 6,404 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its programs and for faculty research.

 

 

Categories: Dean Eli Jones, Featured Stories, Mays Business, MBA, News, Texas A&M

The story of Mays Business School Professor Henry Musoma and Texas A&M University student Ashton Robinson has surprised them both as it has rippled through personal and corporate social media outlets worldwide.

Robinson, a single mom, told Musoma last Thursday she would not be able to attend class because she couldn’t find a babysitter. Instead of giving her the class notes, as she had asked, Musoma encouraged her to bring the baby to class. Toward the end of the class period, Musoma – the father of four – picked up a restless young Emmett and held him as he finished his lecture.

Robinson posted on Facebook how impactful Musoma’s gesture was to her: “Being a single mom is so challenging but it’s people like Dr. Henry Musoma that make life just a tiny bit easier! THIS is why I’m so proud to be an Aggie! Definitely something I’ll never forget and can’t wait to someday tell Emmett that it’s because of people like this that mommy was able to graduate from the best university in the world.”

Five hours later, those six lines had spread worldwide, and Musoma heard from friends, former students, the president of Texas A&M University, and family members in his home country of Zambia, Africa.

“I never imagined such a thing would happen,” Musoma said. “I was just trying to make sure she had the support she needs to succeed – as I would for any student.”

Musoma teaches “Ethical Decision Making and Conduct” at Mays and International Leadership at the Bush School of Government and Public Service.

The story continues

During that same class period Thursday, Mays Business School Dean Eli Jones surprised Musoma with an award – the first Mays Business School Spirit Award. The plaque reads, “For your selfless service and dedication to students and their educational needs and pursuits and for your heart for building community.”

“One of the things that we pride ourselves on at Mays Business School is having a community that’s connected, a community that’s caring. That’s all part of our Strategic Plan,” Jones said. “But he’s not doing it for the Strategic Plan. He’s not doing it because of our culture, necessarily. He’s doing it because this is who he is.”

Jones was joined in the auditorium by Marty Loudder, associate dean of undergraduate programs; Duane Ireland, executive associate dean; and Wendy Boswell, head of the management department.

After a few moments of silence, Musoma broke into an impromptu lecture. “When you do kind deeds you never die. So when you are a generous person, you have no fear of death.”

Then in another act of selflessness, he led the class in singing “Happy birthday” to one of the students before beginning his lecture.

Ashton Robinson and Henry Musoma are surprised in class by Dean Eli Jones and Marty Loudder, associate dean of undergraduate programs; Wendy Boswell, head of the management department; and Duane Ireland, executive associate dean. Credit – Taylor Stephens

 

Categories: Center for Business International Studies, Dean Eli Jones, Faculty, Featured Stories, Management, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

Tips for the academic leader — and those who aspire to be one — on how to cultivate donors

Eli Jones, business dean at Texas A&M, speaks at a corporate-relations event. His advice regarding donors: “Get to know their hearts. What is it they’re intending to do?”

The Chronicle of Higher Education

Phil Bailey had a less than favorable idea of fund raising when he became dean of the College of Science and Mathematics at California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo in 1983, a time when the university was just starting to solicit donations. To him, asking donors for money seemed intrusive and unwanted, “like those calls you get while you’re trying to eat dinner.”

Fast forward more than three decades, and the long-serving dean has helped bring in millions of dollars to the college and the university, including a $110-million gift, announced this spring. It was the largest gift ever for the institution and the California State University system. …Read more

Categories: Dean Eli Jones, Donors Corner, Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M

Mays Business School is teaming up with the Bryan-College Station Habitat for Humanity to give a hand up to local families with a Mays-sponsored Habitat Home.

This collegewide project will involve undergraduate and graduate students, as well as faculty and staff in all departments and programs at Mays, to raise $55,000 to build a Habitat home in 2018. So far, funds have been raised at Maysfest, a faculty/staff chili cook-off, and at profit-share events at U Paint It and Grub Burger Bar. 

During the spring, several faculty and staff members filled flower pots and delivered them to Habitat homeowners.

In a video announcement about the partnership, Dean Eli Jones said the project is about Selfless Service, “an Aggie core value that we truly cherish at Mays Business School.” The video is being shown at New Student Conferences throughout the summer to introduce incoming students to the initiative.

Mays faculty and staff members decorated flower pots and gave them as gifts to Habitat for Humanity homeowners.

Andy York, executive director of B/CS Habitat for Humanity, said the project furthers Habitat International’s mission of “bringing people together to build homes, communities, and hope.”

The partnership was initiated by Mays’ Office of Diversity of Inclusion, which identifies targeted opportunities within local and state communities to engage members of the Mays faculty staff and current student population to give back and strengthen community connections.

In September, Mays will launch its primary fund-raising campaign for the year with a gingerbread house decorating competition. After the contest, the 50 gingerbread houses will be delivered to current Habitat homeowners.

Learn more about getting involved with the Mays Habitat for Humanity project at tx.ag/maysbuilds.

Categories: Dean Eli Jones, Faculty, Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Staff, Students, Texas A&M