Mays Business School graduate Denise Byington ’86 and her husband, Bert Garcia, have committed $30,000 to establish a scholarship for her area of interest, the Denise Byington ’86 and Bert Garcia ’81 Endowed Scholarship in Finance.

Their preference is that the students who receive the scholarships have a financial need and be pursuing a degree in finance degree or supply chain management – their daughter’s major. Byington graduated with a bachelor’s degree in finance, while Garcia’s degree was in engineering.

“It’s important for us to give back after a couple of successful careers,” Byington said. “And as the parent of a college-aged child, we understand how difficult it can be to pay for a college education. If we could help some future Aggies, we would love to do that – especially if it is for a deserving business student.”

Eli Jones, dean of Mays Business School, said he appreciates it when former students provide avenues for future students to attend college. “This is an example of the Aggie spirit at work,” he said. “These two former students could have done so many things with their money, and they are choosing to help boost the future students of Mays. Such dedication is what keeps our programs alive and ensures our legacy as a top-notch business school.”

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,900 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, business, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

 

 

 

 

Categories: Alumni, Departments, Donors Corner, Former Students, Mays Business, Texas A&M

Mays Communications Specialist Courtney Bosquez has been selected to join Cinemark’s new Chairman’s Advisory Committee. The newly created committee will help provide innovative input and feedback to Cinemark’s management team.

Bosquez has beeCourtney Bosquezn with the Center for Retailing Studies since May 2014. There, she promotes the center across Texas A&M University and to a national audience of retailers through visual, print, e-mail and social communications. She is also responsible for all of the design and marketing efforts for the annual Retailing Summit in Dallas along with providing communications support for the Dallas/Fort Worth Retail Executives Association.

She was selected for the Chairman’s Advisory Committee through a competitive application and interview process. The committee members, who are not employed by Cinemark, will represent the 10 best and brightest young leaders in the DFW area and beyond.

Cinemark founder and chairman Lee Roy Mitchell created the committee with a vision that, “the program will be mutually beneficial to both Cinemark and our committee members.”

Committee members will serve two-year terms and meet five times a year, to work alongside Mitchell and other members of Cinemark’s management. “The committee members will have the opportunity to work with me and learn how to conduct business in today’s corporate environment in an honest and ethical manner,” Mitchell stated in a news release.

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,900 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, business honors, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

 

Categories: Departments, Mays Business, News, Staff, Texas A&M

David Cordani (2)

David Cordani ’88, president and CEO of Cigna Corporation, will speak at Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School Sept. 18. The program will be in Wehner 113 from 12:40 p.m.to 1:30 p.m.

No American university has turned out more Fortune 100 company CEOs than Texas A&M, according to a recent U.S. News & World Report ranking. Now Mays is bringing one of those CEOs home. Cordani graduated from Texas A&M with a bachelor’s degree in accounting, and earned an MBA from the University of Hartford. He is an accomplished athlete, having competed in more than 125 triathlons.

Cordani will share his perspective on improving health care, now and for the future. He believes that today’s health care dialogue is too narrowly focused on lowering health costs. This focus, he says, inevitably results in an emphasis on an old model based on financing “sick” care. Rather, he believes, our dialogue should place greater emphasis on building a more sustainable health care system that better engages individuals in their own care management. This can be accomplished, he says, by focusing on three foundational elements: 1) Aligning the incentives for everyone involved in the health care process; 2) Embracing value-based payments and rewards and 3) Executional excellence, aided by information and insight.

James Benjamin, head of the accounting department at Mays, remembers Cordani as a student. “David Cordani’s relatively quick rise to be one of the leaders in the health care field is particularly remarkable,” Benjamin said. “I am confident he will continue to make important contributions to this very important field.”

In 2009, Cordani became president and CEO of Cigna, a company he has worked with for more than 24 years. He has spearheaded its transformation into a leading global health service company, doubling the size of the company in five years. He is a prominent voice addressing key health challenges, such as empowering individuals to manage their own health, innovating new health delivery models focused on patients’ health improvements and partnering with physicians to focus on wellness and improving clinical quality.

Cordani leads Cigna’s more than 37,000 employees in more than 30 countries in improving the health, well-being and sense of security of the more than 88 million customer relationships.

Prior to joining Cigna, Cordani was with Coopers & Lybrand. He actively works with the March of Dimes, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and the Achilles International Freedom Team of Wounded Veterans, and is a charter board member of ChildObesity180. Cordani was named to the General Mills Board of Directors in 2014 and to the U.S.-India Business Council Board of Directors in 2015.

For information, contact Diane McDonald at dmcdonald@mays.tamu.edu or 979-845-0193.

*Registration is not required for current students and faculty

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,900 undergraduate, master and doctoral students in accounting, business, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Alumni, Departments, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M

After spending most of an eight-day residency at Mays Business School immersed in the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities (EBV), 19 veterans returned home ready to roll out their business endeavors. They took with them the encouraging words and training from their mentors, guest speakers and Mays faculty members.

19758489749_181edd527c_o

The July 11-18 event was the eighth at Texas A&M University for post-9/11 veterans with service-connected disabilities. It is hosted in partnership with the Institute for Veterans and Military Families at Syracuse University (IVMF), which holds similar programs at seven other universities nationwide. They developed skills needed to launch and maintain successful businesses. The participants received training and mentoring. They also got a taste of life as an Aggie.

Some of the business proposals included bounce house rentals, business coaching, a trucking company and a network to help female veterans find relevant products, apparel and social media sites.

“This is such a great environment for those of us in business,” said Chris Thompson, a former Green Beret who manufactures firearms and conducts firearms training in Bryan. “They understand the challenges veterans face, and they know what new business owners need.”

This year’s event started with an opening ceremony featuring April Ames-Chase, a member of the EBV Class of 2014 and recipient of the 2015 Robin ’76 and Robert Starnes ’72 EBV Outstanding Alumni Award. She urged the participants to never let anyone dissuade them from pursuing their dreams. “If someone says it’s not possible, just tell them thank you and move on,” she said. “Pray, pivot and move forward.” She also advised the participants to utilize all the resources around them and “network, network, network.”

Dick Lester, executive director of the Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship, who spearheads the EBV each year, told the participants: “You’ll never have another time in your life when you’ll do nothing but focus on your business. Soak it up. Use it. Benefit from it.”

On the final day of this year’s program, the EBV participants presented their final business plan pitches and presentations. After a tour and reception at the George Bush Presidential Library and Museum, they were joined by program mentors, sponsors and guests at closing ceremonies at the Annenberg Conference Center.

The keynote speaker, Retired U.S. Army Master Sgt. Todd Nelson, told stories that captivated his audience. While serving in Afghanistan, Nelson was 10 feet from a suicide bomber. After three years and 40 surgeries — 20 life-saving, 20 reconstructive (while finishing his degree) — he was hired by USAA in San Antonio to help recruit other veterans.

19757139248_7a691c8b81_oHe said he was asked to be an example/inspiration for a consortium of doctors developing and researching new ways to grow skin and extremities. He said he went forward with his recovery rather than live off his pension and disability for three reasons:

  • Make a promise and follow a dream
  • Set an example for his daughters
  • Be a deserving husband

Nelson’s message to EBV participants emphasized the importance of finding the inspiration behind their entrepreneurial ventures. He closed by saying, “You know the how and the what. You need to find the why.”

After the residency phase of the program, the EBV participants have access to numerous resources, coordinated by Syracuse University’s Institute for Veterans and Military Families: mentoring, technical assistance, financing services, legal services and website design. “We want to make sure they keep their momentum after getting this far,” said A.J. Florkowski, EBV national program director for the Institute for Veterans. “We also want to help them raise awareness in their own communities of what they are doing. That will help them build their network once they get back home.”

– Julia Mora ’17 contributed to this story.

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,900 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, business, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

 

 

 

 

Categories: Centers, Departments, Mays Business, Texas A&M

Accounting graduate David Kandolha ’89 advised current students to find the right fit for their first job and to seek guidance from mentors throughout their careers. Mentors are ideally more than two years ahead in their careers and have common interests, he told a group of Business Honors students at Mays.

Business Honors and accounting major Madeline Kelly said one of the things she took away from the talk was that she should takeDavid Kandolha advantage of opportunities like the one to meet with Kandolha. “He thinks learning from mentors is the best way to grow as a person and learn from the mistakes of people who have already been in our shoes, and it will help us get knowledge about the best way to go about a situation,” she explained.

After graduating from Texas A&M University with an accounting degree, Kandolha began his career at Arthur Andersen auditing energy companies. He also holds a JD from South Texas College of Law and a certificate in International Studies from the Bush School of Government. He is a certified public accountant and a member of the New York Bar Association.

Kandolha said when he was going through the interview process, he had a feeling public accounting was the place to be. He worked at Arthur Anderson initially, then attended law school at night while working for the energy trading division of Metallgesellschaft.

He had four job offers from big accounting firms when he was about to graduate. He gave the students advice on what to consider when seeking a job:

  • Do not choose a firm based only on starting salary
  • The biggest firm with the best reputation may not be the best fit for you
  • Learn about the training the company will provide
  • Think about what skills you will gain that are going to be important for you five to 10 years down the line

Kandolha said the most important thing to look at is what employees take away from a particular job – the skills and the network. “Look at the people you’re going to be working with and connecting with and learning from,” he said. He also advised looking very carefully at the company’s culture. “Make sure it’s a good fit for you,” he said. “There’s a lot of prestige that goes with saying, ‘I worked for Goldman Sachs’ or another company, but if the company’s culture is not a good fit for you, if will not be the best choice for you.”

He also recommended that the students find mentors to meet with at least monthly, once they have secured a job. “Those are the people who, when an opportunity for promotion comes up, will stand up for you,” he said. “Look for people you relate to and who are willing to take the time to be an effective mentor.”

Kandolha is a co-founder of Akeida Capital Management, an environmental investment manager that invests in carbon reduction, renewable energy and energy efficiency projects globally. Akeida raised more than $100 million, which it used to finance the construction of four biomass power plants, solar facilities and carbon reduction projects. Akeida owns two biomass power plants, a solar thermal system on the Arizona State University campus and a portfolio of emission credits.

Kandolha was previously a managing director and a founder of Natsource Asset Management, which invested in carbon reduction projects and managed $800 million dollars at its peak. Natsource was started in 1994 by Kandolha and his 4 partners in New York City.  The company went international within four years, opening opened offices in Toronto, Washington, D.C., Calgary, London, Oslo and Tokyo.  At its peak, Natsource employed over 200 people. He aided in the formation and management of businesses in New York, London and Oslo on behalf of Natsource.

Prior to Natsource, Kandolha was a broker of natural gas swaps and options at Euro Brokers Capital Markets and a natural gas analyst with Metallgesellschaft.

Kandolha said he has learned a tremendous amount along the way. “I always consider my mistakes to be seminars,” he said. “And I try to learn from my mistakes and other people’s experiences.”

The students listened intently as Kandolha spoke. Shiv Bembalkar, a Business Honors and finance major, said he always finds it interesting to hear about the careers of former students from Mays. “Mr. Kandolha repeatedly expressed how he felt when he was sitting in our chair,” he said. “His presentation was geared to how he came up in his career path, while noting key things that would help us take advantage of situations when we first start working professionally.”

Caroline Fluke, a Business Honors and supply chain management major, said listening to Kandolha speak was highly motivating. “One of the best takeaways I got from Mr. Kandolha was his advice on how to choose our first job,” she said. “He spoke about the importance of having a mentor and enjoying the environment and people you work with. I am glad I went!”

Vivek Singh, a Business Honors and finance major, added: “David Kandolha served as living proof that the unconventional path can lead to success. It was exciting to hear about his career decisions, and his worldview focused on finding inefficiencies and creating change to fix them. From environmental investing to interactions on a trade floor, it was a truly interesting discussion!”

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,900 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

 

 

 

Categories: Business Honors, Departments, Mays Business, Texas A&M

[cycloneslider id=”networking”]

The key to good networking is to not only show up and speak up, but to also have a few ideas about how you can serve the other person. Master networker, international speaker and best-selling author Keith Ferrazzi called those acts of care “five packets of generosity.”
“Everything you want to achieve—every job, every volunteer opportunity and every interaction—depends on other people,” Ferrazzi told more than 175 people, mostly graduate business students, attending a day-long conference at Texas A&M University. The “Relationships for Career Success” conference was sponsored by Mays Business School’s Graduate Business Career Services. “It is worth it to invest time in building a more purposeful people plan.”
Ferrazzi asserted in his keynote speech that relationship style isn’t about being big. “It isn’t about bounding into a room, it’s about being authentic and caring about the other person,” he said. He advised that each of us meet people where they are and mirror their social styles to help them feel comfortable. “The people with better social capital get better jobs more quickly. Managers are better leaders and sales people get better sales.”
Ferrazzi is widely published; his book “Never Eat Alone” has been a bestseller since 2005, and “Who’s Got Your Back” is based on accountability groups.
After conference attendees heard from Ferrazzi, they practiced what they learned, starting with a short networking warmup during the break. After lunch, students initiated conversations with recruiters in 10-minute speed-networking sessions, then were critiqued on their ability to do so. They also visited the nine corporate booths that were set up along the perimeter of the room.

Event organizer Cindy Billington, associate director of MBA Career Education at Mays, patterned the event after a professional conference, and scheduled it in the middle of recruiting season. She met Ferrazzi several years ago, when Texas A&M was the first campus to benefit from a training program for college students offered by Ferrazzi’s research institute.

During a panel discussion following Ferrazzi’s remarks, leaders from five companies gave advice and fielded questions. Matthieu Tagnon, director of Essilor Lenses, a long-time recruiter of Mays graduates, summarized the advice of all the panelists. “Don’t hesitate to take risks, but stay true to yourself,” he said. “If you are fake, we will see it and we will smell it. Don’t overdo it

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL
Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,600 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Centers, Departments

[cycloneslider id=”mabs”]

Five students—Daizia McGhee, Eric Hernandez, Anthony Guzman, Ingrid Miranda and Rayshanda Massey—were invited to lunch one day to join Annie McGowan, director of the Professional Program at Mays. The lunch discussion focused primarily on whether the students (all first-generation college students from populations that are underrepresented on campus) were happy with their decision to join Mays Business School. The general consensus was that they were all sure they had chosen their educational institution wisely. The opportunities that are available to Mays students greatly surpassed their expectations.

Although they were very happy to be Mays students, the five were also unanimous in their opinion that there was very little at Mays that made it feel like home for them. Texas A&M University, and by extension Mays Business School, are both deeply rooted in a very unique culture. This culture reinforces the notion that people who are alike tend to think alike. While these students were interested in becoming a part of this culture, they would be gratified and even inspired if the institution offered opportunities to embrace more of their own cultures and to interact with successful people from diverse walks of life.

It is clear that once Mays students embark upon the career of their choice, globalization will be staring them square in the face. Learning to respect and respond appropriately to different voices and viewpoints promotes creativity in the work place. “I strongly believe that if Mays earns a reputation for creating an environment that values differences and trains its students to capitalize upon those differences, we are more likely to attract the best and brightest from all groups,” McGowan said.

The firms that recruit our students are firmly onboard. They understand that in an environment of inclusiveness, diversity can be a source of competitive advantage.

The Multicultural Association of Business Students (MABS) was founded as a result of this discussion, with these five students constituting the executive board and McGowan agreeing to serve as their advisor.

MABS was created with the following objectives in mind:

  • To encourage an inclusive environment at Mays that reflects the general and cultural diversity of the entire student body.
  • To establish a stronger presence of the minority population in Mays Business School through professional development, academic achievement and community involvement.
  • To provide corporations direct access to the multicultural population when recruiting for career opportunities and other networking events.
  • To increase minority student enrollment in Mays Business School through an outreach program for high school students.

Beginning Fall 2014, MABS welcomes participation from all Mays Business School students and is excited about partnering with companies that also embrace inclusiveness. For more information about the Multicultural Association of Business Students, please contact Dr. Annie McGowan at amcGowan@mays.tamu.edu.

Categories: Departments

Six Mays students were selected for the Academy for Future International Leaders (AFIL), a year-long interdisciplinary program presented by the Study Abroad Programs Office of Texas A&M University.

The Mays students are Will Burns, Franco Cruz, Kevin Gattshall, Leah Parker, Chelsea Till and Ryan Yeager.

In the high-impact program, outstanding undergraduates with potential leadership skills obtain in-depth learning experience in global issues. AFIL complements any major and allows students to gain a global perspective and to prepare for leadership roles in the increasingly international 21st Century. The AFIL is especially suited for students who have had little or no international experience.

The AFIL program consists of four components: a spring seminar, a mentoring program, an international leadership challenge project and an optional international opportunity.

The students’ fees are funded by the Association of Former Students.
AFIL began in 1998 under the vision of the Texas A&M International Advisory Board, an esteemed group of leaders from a variety of fields who advise Texas A&M on matters of international outreach and collaboration. The academy is a joint effort among A&M’s nine academic colleges and is coordinated through the Study Abroad Programs Office.

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL
Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,600 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Departments

Making healthcare services available to patients where, when and how they want to be served is becoming a priority for medical practices. The consumer’s definition of convenience has changed dramatically, due in part to the speed of the internet. Patients are no exception. What used to be satisfactory in obtaining a medical appointment may now be unacceptable, sending patients otherwise loyal to their doctor to a medical clinic in a drug store, an urgent care clinic or even the emergency room when unable to obtain a timely appointment to see their regular doctor.

In “Toward a Strategy of Patient-Centered Access to Primary Care,” an article appearing in the October issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings and will be available Thursday (Sept. 4) online at the journal’s website, professor Leonard Berry at Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School, and co-authors Dan Beckham, Amy Dettman and Robert Mead, present a comprehensive framework that primary care medical practices can adapt in offering “patient-centered access” (PCA). The framework ranges from improving patient access to in-person appointments of various types to innovative remote access pathways such as off-hours call centers staffed by nurses and video conferencing with a clinician.

The article illustrates each access path with examples from medical practices currently using them and closes with an in-depth discussion of how a Wisconsin-based health organization has evolved its PCA strategy. Had the Veterans Administration applied an access strategy similar to that which is outlined in this article, it conceivably could have avoided the access scandal that has engulfed it and that so poorly served its patients.

Patient-centered access (PCA) to primary care services is rapidly becoming an imperative for efficiently delivering high-quality health care to patients. To enhance their PCA-related efforts, some medical practices and health systems have begun to use various tactics, including team-based care, satellite clinics, same-day and group appointments, greater use of physician assistants and nurse practitioners, and remote access to health services. However, few organizations are addressing the PCA imperative comprehensively by integrating these various tactics to develop an overall PCA management strategy. Successful integration means taking into account the changing competitive and reimbursement landscape in primary care, conducting an evidence-based assessment of the barriers and benefits of PCA implementation, and attending to the particular needs of the institution engaged in this important effort.

Beckham is an MBA. Dettman is an RN and an MBA. Mead is an MD.

Contact Leonard Berry at lberry@mays.tamu.edu.

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,600 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

ABOUT MAYO CLINIC PROCEEDINGS

The flagship journal of Mayo Clinic and one of the premier peer-reviewed clinical journals in general medicine, Mayo Clinic Proceedings is among the most widely read and highly cited scientific publications for physicians, with a circulation of approximately 125,000. While the Journal is sponsored by Mayo Clinic, it welcomes submissions from authors worldwide, publishing articles that focus on clinical medicine and support the professional and educational needs of its readers. www.mayoclinicproceedings.org

ABOUT MAYO CLINIC

Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research, and education for people from all walks of life. For more information visit www.mayoclinic.org/about and www.mayoclinic.org/news.

ABOUT ELSEVIER

Elsevier is a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. The company works in partnership with the global science and health communities to publish more than 2,000 journals, including The Lancet (www.thelancet.com) and Cell (www.cell.com), and close to 20,000 book titles, including major reference works from Mosby and Saunders. www.elsevier.com

 

 

 

 

Categories: Departments

[cycloneslider id=”9108″]

A recent gift to support two high-priority programs will support Mays Business School students for years to come. A total of $550,000 has been provided to establish the Cathy and William W. Davis ’75 MBA Fellowship and the Cathy and William W. Davis ’75 Endowed Business Honors Scholarship Program.

“In talking with the leadership at Mays, Cathy and I felt like both programs needed attention and support,” Bill Davis explained. “Helping students was the priority, and we wanted to help all levels of students.”

Bill Davis is a longtime supporter of Texas A&M. He has served on the Dean’s Development Council at Mays and has maintained close ties with Memorial Student Center Council, where he held several offices — including president — while he was in college.

“Bill and Cathy’s most generous gift will serve many purposes. It will provide the opportunity for students to obtain a world-class education at Mays while providing us with the resources to attract the very best students to our two premier programs,” said Mays Dean Jerry Strawser. “We are most appreciative to them for their generosity and the impact it will have on our school.”

Bill Davis is retired from Crosstex Energy in Dallas, where he was CFO for 10 years and COO for three years. He and his business partners recently announced the formation and private equity backing of Vaquero Midstream Holdings LLC.

He received a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Texas A&M. Cathy Davis is also an Aggie by association — her father graduated in the 1950s and their son Wes graduated in 2004.

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL
Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,600 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Departments, Donors Corner