Within Mays Business School at Texas A&M University resides the highly-ranked Master of Real Estate Program—a degree that comes with a nearly perfect 100 percent job placement record, access to industry leaders and automatic induction into the Aggie Real Estate Network, an alumni group that provides graduates with professional development opportunities.

The graduate program allows students to explore a variety of concentrations within the industry while gaining the fundamental knowledge of commercial real estate.

After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in finance from Texas A&M, Cydney C. Donnell ’81 was able to succeed in an industry she loves. Now, as director of real estate programs and an executive professor within the Department of Finance, Donnell has witnessed firsthand the booming success of the master’s program.

“Thirty-five years ago when I was a graduate, real estate in Texas was headed into a major oversupply. However, I entered the industry at a time when leaders wanted to prove that commercial real estate could be run ethically and professionally,” said Donnell. “I am so proud of the transformation of our industry and I want our students to become the new leaders of the revitalized real estate world.”

Donnell’s enthusiasm for the Master of Real Estate Program goes beyond words and sentiment. Recently, she gave $1 million to the Texas A&M Foundation to support the program’s teaching, research, service and professional development activities, with $750,000 earmarked for matching funds. She will double the value of future donations of $25,000 or more from the Cydney C. Donnell ’81 Faculty Fellowship.

Cydney FoundationAs a former member of the Texas A&M Foundation Investment Advisory Committee, Donnell has worked with the Foundation before. However, this time, she was able to ensure the future of the Master of Real Estate program within Mays and establish a lifelong legacy at Texas A&M.Two other graduates from Texas A&M—Preston Young ’02 and Malcolm Stewart ’73—are also supporting the program with major gifts.

Young, a regional managing partner for Stream Realty Partners, committed $100,000, while Stewart, chief operating officer at Camden Property Trust, established a fund with an additional $100,000 toward the program. Both gifts will be matched with a $100,000 gift from the Cydney C. Donnell ’81 Faculty Fellowship.

Originating 45 years ago in the agricultural economics department, the program has grown in size, recognition and popularity. Since then, it has migrated to the Department of Finance at Mays Business School, developed a diverse course structure, and formed an advisory board of real estate professionals.

Graduates go to work in a variety of careers, from real estate development to lending and capital markets. All leave with enhanced knowledge of finance, real estate law, economics, market analysis and negotiation.

“If Mays wants to excel and provide the best education for our students, we have to offer more: specialized degrees, program enhancements and affordable tuition,” said Donnell. “These funds allow us to enhance a student’s educational opportunities by bringing industry leaders into the classroom, sending students to attend industry events or allowing them to participate in competitions.

What everyone should understand when donating to Texas A&M University is that all funding ultimately helps bring a top-notch educational experience to our students at an affordable cost. My Texas A&M education prepared me for success in the real estate market and I hope to bring the same opportunity to these young people in our program.”

By Ashley Wagner ‘18

Categories: Alumni, Departments, Donors Corner, Mays Business, News, Real Estate, Texas A&M

Mays Business School hosted an inaugural visit to Texas A&M University of distinguished faculty from The University of Havana in Cuba. After meeting with Mays Professor Don Lewis, assistant director of Startup Aggieland, and with Professor Richard Lester, executive director of the Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship (CNVE), through Mays’ Center for International Business Studies, faculty were invited by CNVE to visit Lewis and Lester this summer in Aggieland. Lewis and Lester met the faculty in January while leading Texas A&M’s first study abroad trip to Cuba.
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Three professors from The University of Havana accepted CNVE’s offer, including Anicia Garcia Alvarez, Jose Luis Perello Cabrera and Humberto Blanco Rosales. Alvarez and Rosales are expert economists, while Cabrera is a tourism expert. The cadre arrived in Texas from New York on May 31, but not without challenges as airplanes were late or diverted to different airports and required last-minute, late pickups.

During their first day on campus, Lewis introduced his Cuban guests to representatives with the Association of Former Students (AFS). The AFS provided a tour of campus, including visits to the George Bush Presidential Library, Kyle Field and Memorial Student Center. On the second day, Cuban faculty toured Mays Business School with management faculty members, including Department Head Wendy Boswell and Professor David Flint. Katy Lane with the Center for International Business Studies also joined the tour.

“This inaugural visit by faculty from The University of Havana is the start of a new global collaboration for Texas A&M with a country that has been closed off to Americans for a half-century,” explained Lewis. “The opportunities for both universities are endless and exciting. We look forward to sharing research and innovations with the Cubans and helping each other through joint initiatives.”

Former AFS Chair Jorge Bermudez, a retired Citibank executive and Cuban-born immigrant to the U.S., hosted Cuban faculty on a tour of the Federal Reserve Bank. Lewis’ students from his 2015 study abroad class and Startup Aggieland joined the visiting faculty membesr in Downtown Historic Bryan for the monthly “First Friday” event. AFS President-Elect Phil Miner, founder of The Miner Corporation in San Antonio, hosted the visitors on a tour of NASA and the Port of Houston – then attended an Astros game at Reliant Stadium.

The Cuban faculty members toured the Engineering Innovation Center on June 6 with engineering faculty Magda Lagoudas and Rodney Boehm, then enjoyed dinner at Christopher’s. The next day, they visited the College of Architecture, where Dean Jorge Vanegas hosted a tour of the Live Lab and Viz Arts programs, in addition to the BIM Cave. Faculty later visited the Corps of Cadets Museum and Miramont Country Club, then celebrated new faculty friends from architecture and Mays at Sodolack’s Original Steakhouse, where Rosales was surprised with a “Texas-sized” steak that hung over the serving platter.

On June 9, the day before the end of their 11-day visit, visiting faculty delivered presentations on tourism and the economy in Cuba for a classroom of Texas A&M University faculty, students and former students after a breakfast at Startup Aggieland. Upon their return to Cuba, Cabrera wrote Lewis a note:
“Dear Don. I want to thank all (for) their attention and efforts on the days we were there, where we learned the ways to achieve greater development. The days we stayed, were exploited to the maximum, at least for me. Convey my thanks to all (who) shared their time and chores: Shelly, Abby, Phil, Richard; and others. It is painful for us not to correspond with the same attention. At least for now…see you soon!”

Lewis will return to Havana in January 2017 with another group of students from Texas A&M for a two-week immersion experience in Cuban culture and entrepreneurship. Students will stay mostly in hostels. For more information about the trip, email Lewis at dlewis@mays.tamu.edu or go to http://mays.tamu.edu/center-for-international-business-studies/wp-content/uploads/sites/14/2015/03/Cuba-Winter-2017.pdf

Read a past student participant’s blog here: mays.tamu.edu/cuba/

Categories: Centers, Departments, Faculty, Mays Business, News, Programs, Startup Aggieland, Texas A&M

_Q4A0149-43During the three-day event, 45 research papers were presented in rapid succession. Following only 20 minutes of content overview, scholars received feedback about their topic’s relevancy and potential for application in a business setting from academic peers and industry executives.  …Read more

Categories: Centers, Departments, Marketing, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

By Ben Haimowitz, Academy of Management

What happens when the romance of corporate leadership collides with the romance of stock analysis? With a massive literature devoted to leadership and American companies reportedly spending $14 billion a year to teach it, one might expect a CEO’s reputation for superior governance to prove dominant over even sharp-eyed analysis. Yet, some new research finds otherwise.

According to a study in the current issue of the Academy of Management Journal, “a downgrade by a star analyst causes tremendous valuation changes, which are not offset by the CEO’s reputation….CEO reputation buffers the stock market reaction to downgrades by regular analysts, but, when a downgrade is issued by a star analyst, the CEO’s reputation has almost no effect on the market reaction.”

In short, “star analysts’ reputation is more powerful when it comes to how the market reacts to downgrades, even when star analysts are downgrading firms run by star CEOs.”

Specifically, the researchers found the stock market’s reaction to a downgrade by a star analyst (someone ranked among the top one sixth or thereabouts of the breed) led to an average market-adjusted, two-day decline of a stock of 3.5 to 3.6 percent whether the CEO had won as many as five prestigious leadership awards over the previous five years or had been honored with one or two or none at all. In marked contrast, the impact of a downgrade by analysts outside that select circle varied considerably depending on the reputation of the CEO. While leading to an average market-adjusted decline of 1.93 percent for firms headed by five-time leadership honorees, it produced a 2.74 percent decline for those headed by non-honorees (presumably run-of-the-mill types), a drop of 42 percent more.

Comments Steven Boivie of Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School, who conducted the research with Scott D. Graffin of the University of Georgia and Richard J. Gentry of the University of Mississippi, “There has been much documentation of the advantages a firm enjoys when the CEO has a reputation for excellent leadership (an advantage our study confirms), but little research has been done on how this plays out in interactions with highly reputed others. We’ve all heard about the romance of leadership, a belief verging on mysticism about what great chief executives can lead companies to achieve. But, although we don’t hear quite as much about it, there’s also a romance of stock analysts, who, as Harvard’s Boris Groysberg informs us, have been variously described by seasoned investors as ‘Diogenes with a lamp’ or ‘a Renaissance man’ or a ‘course fixed on truth.’ Our findings suggest that the romance of analysis exceeds the romance of leadership, at least where the investment community is concerned.”

The researchers found a pattern among upgrades that was a somewhat reduced mirror image of the pattern for downgrades. Once again, rating changes by star analysts had the greatest impact on the market. And, once again, the market response to star-analyst changes was about the same no matter the number of awards garnered by CEOs, the average market-adjusted response to their upgrades being between 3.27 percent and 3.29 percent, whether the CEO was a non-honoree or a five-timer.

In contrast, the mean response to upgrades by non-star analysts ranged from 1.86 percent for firms with five-time-honoree CEOs to 2.29 percent for companies of non-honorees, a 23 percent greater boost for the latter group. Why do firms of pedestrian CEOs receive this significantly greater bump? As the professors explain, “Increased expectations for future performance will cause shareholders to react less positively to upgrades by analysts because their expectations that star CEOs will continue to deliver high levels of performance are already reflected in the firm’s value.”

The study draws on large databases of corporate, financial, and market information compiled over a 13-year period. CEO reputation is determined by the number of leadership awards bestowed on a chief in the five years previous to a given year by seven leading business magazines. Analyst stardom is gauged by selection to one of the all-American teams published annually by Institutional Investor magazine through worldwide surveys of money managers at large investment and hedge funds, a select group that constitutes about 17 percent of analysts. The study’s total of about 19,500 downgrades and 17,400 upgrades each consisted of a change of one point or more in recommendations that ranged from 1/strong buy to 5/strong sell.

As would be expected, the researchers controlled for many factors that can influence the effects of changed recommendations, including those related to analysis (such as extent of analysts’ experience or number of a firm’s upgrades or downgrades in the prior two weeks); those related to firms themselves (such as size, diversification, past profitability, and percent of institutional ownership); and those associated with company management (such as board size, CEO duality, and CEO tenure).

CEOs were recipients on average of 1.25 prestigious awards for leadership over five previous years, the study reveals. For the entire sample, each prior award reduced market reaction to a downgrade by an average of 3% and (because of higher market expectations for superior leadership) reduced reaction to an upgrade by 4%. In addition to finding that recommendation changes by star analysts amplified changes in market response compared to those resulting from changes by non-stars, the professors found that “firms being covered by star analysts received more upgrades and downgrades,” a finding that suggests that “star analysts may simply have more discretion in changing the recommendations they issue, and may also have a greater incentive in making changes in order to maintain their recommendation’s accuracy.”

It was also discovered that firms led by CEOs who had received one or more awards generally elicited more recommendation changes than others, which, the professors speculate, may be attributable to analysts’ seeking to “garner attention.” At the same time, “having a large number of CEO awards decreased the number of downgrades a firm received by star analysts.” The two findings lead the authors to observe that “firms led by star CEOs receive greater scrutiny in general…but CEO reputation may offset that scrutiny for star analysts.”

In conclusion, the authors wonder if, given that “star analysts move markets dramatically and are generally more likely to issue recommendation changes…it might be worthwhile [re]considering to what types of firms they are assigned. Markets may function more effectively if these influential analysts are distributed more evenly across all firm sizes and types.”

Adds Boivie: “Instead of having so much insight, and influence clustered around a relatively small number of the sexiest firms, maybe that talent can be of more service covering a more varied group. Instead of having three or four all-stars covering Google or Apple, maybe we could do as well with one or two.”

The paper, “Understanding the Direction, Magnitude, and Joint Effects of Reputation when Multiple Actors’ Reputations Collide” is in the February/March issue of the Academy of Management Journal. This peer-reviewed publication is published every other month by the academy, which, with more than 18,000 members in 123 countries, is the largest organization in the world devoted to management research and teaching. The Academy’s other publications are Academy of Management Review, Academy of Management Perspectives, Academy of Management Learning and Education, Academy of Management Annals and Academy of Management Discoveries.

Categories: Departments, Faculty, Mays Business, Research Notes, Texas A&M

Three members of the Mays Business School faculty will be honored with the 2016 Distinguished Achievement Awards for Teaching. They will be among 24 outstanding Texas A&M faculty and staff members selected by the university and the Association of Former Students. Since 1955, Texas A&M University and the Association of Former Students has given this honor to hundreds of professionals who have exhibited the highest standards of excellence at Texas A&M.

The 2016 Distinguished Achievement Awards will be formally presented at 1:30 p.m. April 25 during a ceremony in Rudder Theater. In recognition of their achievements, each recipient will receive a cash gift, an engraved watch and a commemorative plaque.

The awards and their respective recipients from Mays Business School are:

  • Haipeng “Allan” Chen, Department of Marketing
  • Subodha Kumar, Department of Information and Operations Management
  • Bala Shetty, Department of Information and Operations Management

Allan ChenwebHaipeng (Allan) Chen is the John E. Pearson Endowed Associate Professor of Marketing at the Texas A&M University. He received his Ph.D. in Business Administration (Marketing concentration) from the University of Minnesota (Twin Cities), his M.A. in Applied Linguistics from Zhejiang University (Hangzhou, China) and his B.Eng. (with honors) in Mechanical Engineering from Shandong University of Technology (Zibo, China). Chen conducts research in the area of Behavioral Decision Theory (BDT) and behavioral pricing. His research interests focus on examining decision biases of individual consumers and managers, and their economic and cultural ramifications, mostly in the area of pricing. His research has been published or accepted for publication in Management Science, Marketing Science, the Journal of Marketing Research, the Journal of Consumer Research, the Journal of Marketing, the Journal of Monetary Economics, the Review of Economics and Statistics, Economica, Marketing Letters and the Review of Marketing Research and Energy. Currently, he is serving on the editorial review board of the Journal of Marketing and the Journal of Consumer Psychology. He has won various research awards, including the 2012 ACR Best Competitive Paper Award, the 2010 Ricky W. Griffin Outstanding Research Achievement Award, the Mays Research Fellowship (2007-2010, 2011-2014), the 2007 Marketing Science Institute (MSI) Young Scholar and the 2001 ACR-Sheth Foundation Dissertation Award (co-winner of the Public Policy Track).

dsc_0165copySubodha Kumar is the Carol and G. David Van Houten, Jr. ’71 Professor at the Mays Business School, Texas A&M University. He earned his MBA and Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Dallas in 2000 and 2001, respectively, and his M. Tech. from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur in 1997. He joined the faculty of Mays BusinessSchool in 2009 in the Information and Operations Management Department. Before that, he was faculty at the Foster School of Business, University of Washington, from 2001 to 2009. He is also a regular Visiting Scholar at the Indian School of Business, Hyderabad, India. Professor Kumar’s research and teaching interests include Supply Chain Management, Optimization, and Information Technology. He has published several papers in reputed journals and refereed conferences. In addition, he has co-authored Harvard Business School cases and Ivey Business School cases. The list of journals where his papers have appeared include Management Science, Operations Research, Information Systems Research, Production and Operations Management, IIE Transactions, Decision Sciences, Journal of Management Information Systems, IEEE Transactions on Knowledge and Data Engineering, European Journal of Operational Research, Interfaces, Journal of Scheduling, and Computers and Industrial Engineering. Professor Kumar is currently the Deputy Editor and a Department Editor of Production and Operations Management (POM), a Senior Editor of Decision Sciences, and an Associate Editor of Information Systems Research (ISR). Additionally, he serves on the editorial boards of Journal of Database Management and International Journal of Social and Organizational Dynamics in IT. He is also the Vice President, Communications and the Web Editor of POM Society, and the Vice President of INFORMS’ Information Systems Society (ISS).

download-1Bala Shetty is Professor, holder of the Cullen Trust for Higher Education Chair and Interim Associate Dean for Graduate Programs at Mays Business School. He received his MS and PhD degrees in Operations Research from the School of Engineering at Southern Methodist University (SMU). In addition to serving on the faculty of Texas A&M University since 1985, he has held faculty positions at Cox School of Business (SMU) and Madrid Business School (Spain). He also served as a Research Fellow at Princeton University in 1996 and 2008. His previous leadership roles at the departmental level include service as Ph.D. Director, Assistant Department Head, and Head of Department of Information and Operations Management. At the college level, he served as Associate Dean for Graduate Programs from 2004-2008, and Executive Associate Dean from 2008-2015. He has taught with distinction at multiple levels (undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral levels), and in multiple programs (BBA, Full-Time MBA, Professional MBA, Executive MBA, PhD, and Center for Executive Development). He has been recognized for his outstanding teaching contributions with a number of prestigious awards. At TAMU, they include the Association of Former Students College-Level Teaching Award (2001), EMBA Outstanding Faculty Award (2008, 2014), PMBA Outstanding Faculty Award (2014, 2015), MBA Outstanding Faculty Award (1998, 2000, 2001, and 2005), and Alpha Kappa Psi Undergraduate Teaching Award (1990, 1991). His research interests include supply chain management, optimization, and finance. He has served as associate editor for Operations Research, Decision Sciences, and Naval Research Logistics and twice as a guest editor for the Annals of Operations Research.

Categories: Departments, Faculty, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M

A red chair was a key player in the 17th annual Women in Information Technology Conference, held March 4 in the Memorial Student Center on the Texas A&M University campus. The conference is hosted by the Center for the Management of Information Systems (CMIS) at Mays Business School. The theme, “Big Data,” focused on the variety of data collected, processed and analyzed in our world today, as well as the consumer perspective, such as reward programs generated from data collection.redchair2

The attendees were encouraged to find ways to promote women in technology. The red chair was unveiled at the front of the room as a symbol inviting men and women to “sit” and acknowledge the need for more diversity in technology. In addition, CMIS engaged student volunteers this year to assist in the Hour of Code at the elementary through high school levels in the Brazos Valley.

In attendance were about 144 people, a mix of current students from Texas A&M, Blinn College, Prairie View A&M, Tarleton State, MIS professionals and CMIS advisory board members. CMIS board members sponsoring various aspects of the event included Exabyte Members – ConocoPhillips, GM, HP, Noble Energy, Phillips 66 and Shell; Petabyte Members – Anadarko, Chevron, ExxonMobil, National Instruments, PwC and USSA; Terabyte Members – Charles Schwab, Deloitte, Marathon Oil and Southwest Airlines; and WIT Conference Sponsor Goldman Sachs.

After a welcome by Robin Starnes, director of CMIS, and Rich Metters, chair of the Department of Information Systems and Operations Management, Alyssa Michalke kicked off the day discussing her journey to becoming the first female Corps Commander at Texas A&M.

Three keynote presentations were given:

  • “Thanks for Listening” by John Krajicek, executive professor and assistant director of communication studies at Mays;
  • “Your Data and Customer Loyalty Programs” by Kristen Dearing, senior vice president, Marketing and Sales Alliances, Brierley and Partners;
  • “The Future of Advanced Analytics with Big Data” by Neera Talbert, director of Microsoft.

A panel of CMIS board members and former MIS students discussed “Women’s Strengths in Business.” Panel members were Victoria Blessing ’14 of Texas A&M; Lauren Dillon of Deloitte; Jennifer Hohman of ConocoPhillips; Renee Schroeder ’86 of Charles Schwab; Pamela Jones ’02 of General Motors; and Kayla Cermack ’10 of Southwest Airlines.

CMIS provided scholarships to three Texas A&M students during the conference. Photography throughout the day was provided by students in the Texas A&M Photography Club, Vision Inspired. Numerous prizes and gift cards were awarded to attendees, donated by CC Creations, Barnes & Noble, Deloitte, Goldman Sachs, Noble Energy, Phillips66, Smoothie King, Southwest Airlines and CMIS.

Officers from the Texas A&M student organization Women in IT worked with other MIS students, faculty and staff to plan the event.

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 6,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, business, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Departments, Faculty, Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

gI_67033_Shelly BrenckmanShelly Brenckman, marketing coordinator at Texas A&M University’s Startup Aggieland, was named the 2015 International Brand Master, announced competition sponsor, Educational Marketing Group, Inc. (EMG) http://www.emgonline.com. This international award, now in its seventh year, is presented annually to an exemplary educational brand manager. Brenckman took top honors for her ability to create a story-centered brand while utilizing creative and traditional marketing techniques with zero dollars in the marketing budget.

Startup Aggieland, powered by the Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship (CNVE) at Texas A&M’s Mays Business School, keeps Brenckman busy as the only full-time staff member in the 1 1/2 employee program. She developed the name of the program and brand identity through strategic story telling techniques. In addition, she utilized guerilla marketing, event promotion, social media platforms, and media releases. Brenckman collaborated with Texas A&M’s Marketing & Communications division to get their support for distribution and to amplify Startup Aggieland’s message with their own media releases. She worked with campus publications to help spread the word about Texas A&M’s student startups and accelerator, including Aggiebound magazine for future students and their parents, and The Battalion student daily.

One of the first things that Brenckman did was to organize a stylish photo shoot to showcase Startup Aggieland students as part of its branding. These photos helped the brand have a consistent theme throughout all digital and print materials so it would be easily recognizable and stand out. The brand was also promoted using t-shirt marketing, event/mobile app marketing, and giveaways Brenckman carefully protects the Startup Aggieland brand so it is not overused and maintains its mystique. She also has utilized popup banners to promote Startup Aggieland’s academic partners and sponsors, as well as the brand itself.

“When I think of Startup Aggieland, I think of Shelly,” said Rodney Hill, presidential professor, former assistant dean, and founding board member of Startup Aggieland. “She helped raise it from an idea, nourished it to where it is a nationally-recognized business accelerator for students, and now faculty, too. During her involvement with Startup Aggieland, the three-year-old program has been showcased at the White House in Washington D.C. and students in the program have earned many awards at international pitch competitions. Shelly is the marketing soul of Startup Aggieland, having come up with the name and brand identity.”

Brenckman competed against two other strong finalists to win top honors in the International Brand Master competition. Katie Kempf, alumnae relations and special events, Ursuline Academy, St. Louis, Missouri, and Johanna Lowe, head of marketing, communications, and engagement, University of Sydney, Australia, were runners up. Brenckman competed with an initial field of seven exceptional nominees, five of whom hailed from the United States, one from Australia, and one from United Kingdom.

“We are honored to recognize Shelly Brenckman’s outstanding marketing skills. She conceived the Startup Aggieland brand and produced extraordinary results while working as the sole full-time staff member, making her a standout in the competition,” said Bob Brock, EMG president.

Colleagues in education branding will be able to hear more from Brenckman, as EMG will honor her success with a series of interviews during the coming months.

More information on the 2015 International Brand Master and Startup Aggieland, can be found at http://emgonline.com/ibm-award/past-awards/2015-master/.

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SHELLY BRENCKMAN BACKGROUND
Shelly Brenckman wears many hats at Startup Aggieland as the facility’s only full-time employee since May 2013. Although her title at Startup Aggieland is marketing coordinator, she also serves as a mentor, event planner and office manager with some responsibility for managing student workers and representing Startup Aggieland at outside events. She helps Assistant Director Don Lewis with strategic planning, creating new programming and developing related course curriculum. In particular, her work focuses on donor development, sponsor and speaker recruitment, and recruitment of mentors and new student entrepreneurs. As marketing coordinator, Shelly is the webmaster and social media manager, as well as the mobile app manager. She creates all branding for Startup Aggieland and communicates the facility’s story both internally and externally through print, radio, social media and gorilla marketing. As a mentor, Shelly has advised nearly every student venture launching from Startup Aggieland and some that never became official clients. She also has advised former students and remote-learning students in other states. Shelly connects student startups with funding and board members by tapping her extensive network of alumni, administrators and CEOs. Shelly manages the 44-bed Dormcubator on campus, a residential program for freshmen and sophomores that is operated by Startup Aggieland as a Startup Living Learning Community. She teaches MGMT 289: Introduction to Entrepreneurship for Mays Business School, a multi-disciplinary course for Dormcubator students.

INTERNATIONAL BRAND MASTER AWARD BACKGROUND
The International Brand Master award was established in 2009 to bring recognition to the outstanding work of extraordinary educational brand marketing professionals from around the world. Since then, EMG received nominations from countries including Portugal, Belgium, Scotland, Netherlands, Australia, England, Canada, and the United States. This year, a blue-ribbon panel of volunteer international judges from the United States, Ireland, and England reviewed supporting materials provided by the nominees. Nominees were asked to provide responses to a number of questions related to their brand’s strategy, tactics, and provide results as well as provide several letters of support from colleagues. The judges narrowed the pool of seven nominees to three distinguished finalists. Two from the United States, Shelly Brenckman, Texas A&M University’s Startup Aggieland, and Katie Kempf, Ursuline Academy, and one from Australia, Johanna Lowe, University of Sydney. Votes to determine the winner among the three finalists were cast by brand stakeholders and fellow branding professionals from around the world. Over 120 individuals voted from around the world. The winner was chosen by a combination of public votes and the judges’ scores. For more information see: http://emgonline.com/ibm-award/.

This year’s judging panel included:

  •     Elizabeth Allen: Director of Online Communications at the American School in London in London, United Kingdom
  •     Jennifer Collins: Grants Administrator at SEAL Legacy Foundation in Virginia, United States
  •     Eilis O’Brien: Director of Communication and Marketing at University College Dublin in Dublin, Ireland
  •     Seth Odell: 2013 International Brand Master Winner and Vice President of Creative and Marketing Strategy at Helix Education in Utah, United States
  •     Dr. David Peck: 2014 International Brand Master Winner and Vice President of University Relations at Azusa Pacific University in California, United States
  •     Kay Zimmerman: Associate Vice Provost Marketing & Partnership Development and Special Assistant to the Senior Vice President for Academic Outreach & Entrepreneurship at North Carolina State University DELTA in North Carolina, United States
  •     Travis Brock: Chair of the 2015 International Brand Master Award committee, and Director of Business Development and Social Media for Educational Marketing Group, Inc. in Colorado, United States (replacement judge)

ABOUT EMG
EMG is a full-service, integrated brand development and marketing agency that provides custom-tailored research, brand development, creative, development, new media services, and media services for universities throughout North America. Headquartered in Parker, Colorado, the company was established in 1997 and has operated in the higher education arena exclusively for 19 years. Clients have included Colorado Community College System, North Carolina State University, Washington State University, Virginia Tech, Cal Poly, Dalhousie University, University of Victoria, University of Colorado, University of Illinois, University of Michigan, University of Wyoming, and many others. More information can be found at http://www.emgonline.com.

  • written by Educational Marketing Group

Categories: Centers, Departments, Mays Business, News, Staff, Texas A&M

Yan Liu, an assistant professor of finance at Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School, received the 17th Annual Bernstein Fabozzi/Jacobs Levy Award with colleague Campbell R. Harvey. Their article, “Backtesting,” was published in the Fall 2015 issue of The Journal of Portfolio Management. The awards were announced by Institutional Investor Journals, the leading publisher of practical research in investment management and finance.

Liu said he was thrilled to receive the award. “We know that there has been intense data mining both in academia and

Liu

the financial industry,” he said. “The fact that my paper is well-received by the profession, especially by finance practitioners, tells me that we are starting to realize the severity of data mining bias. I hope that the analytical tools provided in my paper can be useful to researchers and practitioners when they try to evaluate the real significance of an investment strategy.”

The Bernstein Fabozzi/Jacobs Levy awards were established in 1999 to honor the journal’s editors, Peter L. Bernstein and Frank Fabozzi, and promote research excellence in the theory and practice of portfolio management.

In their article, Liu and Harvey, a professor at Fuqua School of Business at Duke University and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Mass., offer an analysis on backtesting. This is the practice of applying strategy and analytics to historical trading data to determine how well real trading results could have been predicted.

Harvey said it is a great honor to receive the award. “We are in an investment environment where there is intense pressure to produce something that looks good. Unfortunately, this leads to extensive data mining,” he said. “This, in turn, results in impressive backtests that convince many investors to put their money into products that have the propensity to disappoint. I am encouraged by the reception my paper has received in the investment management community. Managers don’t want to disappoint clients, and my paper provides new tools to help them make sure they don’t.”

According to Bruce Jacobs, principal and co-founder of Jacobs Levy Equity Management, Harvey and Liu, who also took the top prize last year, “continue to contribute vital insights into a very important issue: how to tell if the findings obtained from research ‘in the lab’ will hold up to deliver like results in the real world.”

 

Categories: Departments, Faculty, Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M

In July 2015, Dean Eli Jones named Wendy R. Boswell as the head of the Department of Management, succeeding Ricky Griffin who served from 2011 to 2014, and Duane Ireland, who was interim department head for a year after Griffin became interim dean. Boswell is a powerhouse among researchers, particularly in the field of human resource management. Her scholarship that is concerned with employee attraction and retention, job search behavior and the work/non-work interface has appeared in various scholarly and practitioner journals.

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Boswell was recruited to Texas A&M University in 2000 as an assistant professor at Mays Business School after she earned her Ph.D. from the School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University. She was an assistant professor until being promoted in 2005 to associate professor and appointed as director of the Center for Human Resource Management. She has held the Jerry and Kay Cox Endowed Chair in Business at Mays since 2013.

She serves on the editorial boards for several academic publications and is an associate editor for Personnel Psychology. She also served as the 2012-13 Chair of the HR Division of the Academy of Management and is a Fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology and the American Psychological Association.

Boswell said that her willingness to accept different roles in the management department over time (such as her service as Director of the CHRM Center and as the department’s Doctoral Program Coordinator) yielded valuable opportunities for her to learn about the challenges associated with leading what is an eclectic management department. These experiences, coupled with her strong commitment to observe others in various leadership roles, have served as an excellent foundation for her work as head of the management department.

Her former department head, Murray Barrick, shared accolades about Boswell. “Every day is a fun day with Wendy Boswell. She is smart, persistent, loyal, and as just noted, enjoys having fun,” he said. “She has impressed me with her thoughtful approach to capitalizing on someone’s strengths to re-organize work and by doing so has ensured that her faculty and staff experience even more success and embrace the opportunity to showcase their talents. I expect Wendy will have a long and successful career as a leader of the department.”

Boswell’s goals for the management department include those of preparing for faculty retirements that are imminent and working with others to further enhance key high impact programs within the department involving entrepreneurship and human resource management as well as help shape innovative programs within Mays such as the new Master of Science in Business degree and customized executive programs for the Center for Executive Development.

Based on her field of study, Boswell is committed to leading employees in ways that capitalize on their strengths. She aims to foster inclusion within the department between the varying groups non-tenure track faculty, the tenured and nontenured professors, staff and the center directors. “Just a few months ago, I may not have understood why some things were done the way they were,” she said. “Now, I may have a new perspective but I also bring insight from being a faculty member here in Mays for a while and from serving in different roles within the department. With this perspective, there are a few things I can do. For instance, our intradepartmental communication can be improved and we can better capitalize on the unique strengths individuals bring to the department and school.”

John Boudreau, who was Boswell’s dissertation chair when she was a Ph.D. student at Cornell University, said she was patient and gifted when working as a research assistant through several rounds of writing and editing research articles.

He described her as “remarkably modest. “On one paper, I gave her a conceptual outline of something I thought might be interesting. In her customary way she did a very thorough job producing quite a nice first draft,” he recalled. “When I noted how much work she had done, she simply said, ‘It was all in your outline, I just filled it in.’” 

At Mays, the department head must also be a full professor. Boswell teaches courses on human resource management at the undergraduate, graduate (master’s and doctoral) and executive levels, and was the recipient of the Center for Teaching Excellence Montague Scholar Award (2004) and the Dr. Ricky W. Griffin Research Award (2012).

Being a department head is like a double or triple dose of responsibility, because you’ve got commitments to your class and research program but also a whole lot of administrative tasks including plenty of meetings,” she said. “You have formal responsibilities, but you also have ‘fires’ – all these peripheral things to deal with when things pop up. You cannot schedule for those things and I have learned that each day cannot be planned. If I get one thing done on my ‘to-do’ list, I feel like that’s pretty good.

Another of Boswell’s challenges will be continuing to balance her job with her role as wife and mom of two children. Even though she has done extensive research on work-nonwork conflict and had a study on the pros and cons of constant connection to work published recently in Academy of Management Journal, Boswell says the delineation doesn’t come easily to her. “I think you can have it all, it just depends on how you define ‘all.’ I’ll just have to keep shifting to meet the demands before me.”

“Even though it wasn’t strategized, I could see this new role coming,” she said, referring to preparation by her predecessors Ricky Griffin, Duane Ireland, and Murray Barrick and a key mentor Don Hellriegel. “I knew my colleagues believed in me and had faith in my ability to lead.”

Boswell added: I’m truly happy to be here, that’s why I’ve been here my entire academic career, and I’m excited about the future and our leadership.

BOSWELL’S ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2015 – Head of the Department of Management, Mays Business School

2013 Holder of the Jerry and Kay Cox Endowed Chair in Business

2012-2013 Rebecca U. ’74 & William S. Nichols III ’74 Professor of Management, Mays Business School

2005-2011 Director, Center for Human Resource Management (CHRM), Mays Business School

20052012 Associate Professor of Management, Mays Business School

20002005 Assistant Professor of Management, Mays Business School

EDUCATION

Cornell University, Ph.D., May 2000, School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Major: Human Resource Studies, Minors: Management, Statistics

Cornell University, M.S., May 1997, School of Industrial and Labor Relations

California State University, Fresno, B.S., December 1994, Craig School of Business, Major: Human Resource Management, Graduated Magna Cum Laude

 

Categories: Departments, Faculty, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M, Uncategorized

Geoff Greenwade ’83 describes his successful 30-year banking career as “a path of accidents.” While speaking with a group of Business Honors students at Mays Business School, he encouraged them to learn how to recognize these hidden opportunities that have contributed to his success.

22704572519_551be4021b_oGreenwade is the president and chief executive officer of Greenbank, a leading Texas bank for commercial lending and personal banking services. Before joining Greenbank in 2008, Greenwade held positions at Bank of America and Wells Fargo. He holds a bachelor’s degree in finance from Texas A&M University and an MBA from Baylor University.

While speaking of his time at Texas A&M, he encouraged students to take advantage of all of the opportunities available, stressing the importance of networking with fellow classmates and learning the art of balance. “The [Aggie] ring gets you an invite to an elite club,” he said. “Take full advantage of it.”

He also emphasized the importance of finding opportunities in unconventional places. Greenwade’s pointers included sitting next to the most important person in the room, actively listening and asking purposeful questions.  “Your career path will not fall into your lap. You are the only one who can actively manage it,” he said. “Learn to be in the right place at the right time.”

Business Honors major Carly Hicks ’19 said she appreciated Greenwade’s transparency, noting her biggest takeaway was that oftentimes one’s career seems to just fall into place by being open-minded. “What I found most striking is that Mr. Greenwade originally pursued his career for a trivial reason, but ended up loving it and being good at it,” she said. “Thus, his success in and love for his career came from what could be seen as an accident.”

Greenwade said the most important step when beginning a career is to honestly evaluate your strengths and passions. “Choosing a path that you are passionate about will benefit you longer than the salary will,” he said.

“My greatest insight from this luncheon was how to use strengths to your advantage,” said Business Honors student Christina Chan ’17. “Mr. Greenwade has the strength of individualization, and this strength was easy to see when he went around the table asking about each individual student.”

Additional advice Greenwade gave students included identifying your priorities and recognizing the importance of character. Greenwade told the students: “Business revolves around character. To be successful you need the right employees, the right customers and supportive shareholders, and you will not get those without having strong character.”

In closing, Greenwade advised students to “show up every day and work harder than everyone around you.” He added: “Success isn’t about how smart you are, but how hard you work.”

Business Honors major Trevor Pownell ’18 commented afterward on Greenwade’s easygoing, friendly demeanor. “I left Mr. Greenwade’s luncheon feeling reassured and carrying a newfound interest in the banking world,” Pownell said. “His eclectic path to success was extremely insightful on how to handle upcoming life decisions.”

Categories: Alumni, Business Honors, Departments, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M