The 18th annual Women in Information Technology Conference, held March 3 in the Memorial Student Center on the Texas A&M University campus, attracted an array of women interested in informational technology.

Current students from Texas A&M, Blinn College, Prairie View A&M, Houston Christian School and Texas A&M-Texarkana, along with information systems professionals and CMIS board members attended the conference, which is hosted by the Center for the Management of Information Systems (CMIS). A variety of industries from consulting, education, financial, manufacturing and oil & gas were represented by Texas A&M former students and CMIS board members in the MIS (management of information systems) field.

After a welcome by CMIS Director Robin Starnes, Rich Metters, head of the Information Systems and Operations Management Department, presented some facts from his latest publication, “Gender Equality in Operations Management.”  Then the conference opened up with an “ice-breaker” session. Roundtables of networking sessions were conducted three different times, allowing attendees to move to different tables and network with others. A wide variety of topics included “What inspires or motivates you? and “What does your typical day look like?”

The sold-out crowd of close to 200 attendees enjoyed three keynote presentations.

  • Brandie Claborn, Vice President of World Wide Communications at Intel Security, provided an informative and timely presentation on the Cybersecurity industry; the need to fill open positions and the strides at Texas A&M in the Cybersecurity area.
  • Christine Rose, CIO and Head of Ecommerce at Kendra Scott, highlighted The Power of Passion and Perseverance in her career as well as Kendra’s own statement, “NO is only a suggestion.”
  • Stephanie Kinser, Senior Vice President Enterprise Solution Engineering, at Salesforce concluded the speakers with Disruption, Innovation, and Empowerment in the Age of Equality in the age of the technologies that affect our lives, such as the cloud.

A wide variety of prizes and gift cards were awarded to attendees. In addition, CMIS provided scholarships to five Texas A&M students as well as book prizes, The Secrets Leaders Keep and The Confidence Code. Texas A&M Information Technology donated two Air 128GB Wi-Fi IPADS and David Gardner’s donated a Katie Decker Century Tree necklace. Every attendee received a surprise yellow box of fashion earrings donated from Kendra Scott.

CMIS board members sponsoring the conference included Exabyte Members – ConocoPhillips, Deloitte, GM, HP Enterprise, Noble Energy, Phillips 66, and Shell; Petabyte Members – Anadarko, Chevron, ExxonMobil, HP Inc., National Instruments and PwC; Terabyte Members – Charles Schwab, Protiviti, and USAA.

MIS students, faculty and staff assisted in the planning of the event. Additional information on the CMIS and all sponsored events is at http://cmis.tamu.edu.

 

 

 

Categories: Departments

In a rapidly globalizing environment and ever-changing world, business schools are providing more value than ever. Today at its 2017 Deans Conference, AACSB International (AACSB) — the world’s largest global education network — unveiled 35 innovations that represent critical work being done by business schools to better their communities and society at large.

Mays Business School was recognized for its submission on the Texas A&M University Petroleum Ventures Program (PVP), which detailed a bold new entrepreneurial training program that better prepares students to be leaders in the oil and gas industry. By connecting the curriculum with industry needs, PVP gives students a competitive advantage in an interdisciplinary way.

innovations-thet-inspire

The second annual “Innovations That Inspire” initiative showcases unique ways business schools are changing the status quo to address societal needs, while empowering the business leaders of tomorrow.

The AACSB’s second annual “Innovations That Inspire” initiative recognizes institutions that have championed change in the business education landscape. A total of 315 submissions were received across 33 countries, mirroring society’s growing global demands, as well as the critical need for strong, connected and forward-thinking business schools. The initiative—and the impressive work it showcases—underscores the important role that innovation plays in achieving the industry-wide vision for business education, which AACSB unveiled in 2016.

“With great pleasure, I am thrilled to recognize Mays Business School for its role in driving innovation in business education and fostering positive change in the areas of diversity and global economic prosperity,” said Tom R. Robinson, president and chief executive officer of AACSB international. “Through meaningful ideas and increasing opportunities for engagement, Mays Business School has created a remarkable impact, to ensure a better and more connected world for many years to come.”

Eli Jones, dean of Mays Business School, said the Texas A&M Petroleum Ventures Program “an example of connecting innovation with our school’s vision to advance the world’s prosperity.” He added, “We are honored to receive this recognition for stepping up to serve our state and nation in this important area.” As part of the school’s new strategic plan, Mays aims to build the school’s research presence in the Mays Grand Challenge area of Energy.

The academic collaboration between Mays Business School and the College of Engineering fosters teamwork among petroleum engineering students and students in the Department of Finance at Mays. The first classes for the PVP Certificate Program were offered in Fall 2016. PVP is funded by a $12 million gift by Anthony Bahr ’91 and Jay Graham ’92, business partners in Houston-based WildHorse Resources Management Company in Houston.

About AACSB International

As the world’s largest business education network connecting academe with business, AACSB provides business education intelligence, quality assurance, and professional development services to more than 1,500 member organizations across 97 countries and territories. Founded in 1916, AACSB accredits 780 business schools worldwide. Its global headquarters is located in Tampa, Florida, USA; Asia Pacific headquarters is located in Singapore; and its EMEA headquarters is located in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. For more information, visit www.aacsb.edu.

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 6,200 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, business, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The vision of Mays Business School is to advance the world’s prosperity.

 

 

 

Categories: Centers, Dean Eli Jones, Departments, Energy, Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Programs, Research, Texas A&M

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Happy New Year! Texas A&M’s Mays Business School recently marked or will celebrate several milestones of many of its signature programs in 2017. Here are just a few:

In 1966, over 50 years ago,  the Full-Time MBA program was initiated at Texas A&M University. It is now an 18-month program for young professionals. The Mays MBA programs were expanded in 2012, five years ago, when the Professional MBA program was added to the school’s offerings. The program moved with the Executive MBA program to CityCentre Houston, a mixed-use urban development off Interstate 10 and Beltway 8 in West Houston.

In 1972, 45 years ago, the business school awarded its first Ph.D. The Mays Ph.D. program is currently ranked 8th U.S. public and 13th overall in the U.S. by Financial Times 2015.

In 1992, 25 years ago, the school began recognizing the best of the best of Mays with an annual Outstanding Alumni Award. To date, 79 former students have been recognized with this honor.

In 2008, 10 years ago, Mays joined seven other universities in the EBV Consortium, dedicated to developing veterans in entrepreneurship through the Entrepreneurial Bootcamp for Veterans. Now part of a consortium that includes 10 additional universities across the nation, Texas A&M University continues to offer free training and one-on-one mentoring.

One year ago, in 2016, Mays launched its MS Business program for students who have received non-business bachelor’s degrees and have little or no professional work experience.   The inaugural class class of 41 students represents a wide range of disciplines.

These milestones are just a few examples of Mays Business School’s vision and mission to advance the world’s prosperity by creating impactful knowledge and developing transformational leaders. Share your favorite 2017 milestone with us by tweeting @MaysBusiness.

 

Categories: Centers, Departments, Mays Business, News, Programs, Texas A&M

Eight Mays Business School students have been named 2017 YMA Fashion Scholarship Fund recipients, winning $40,000 in scholarships.

Established in 1937, the Young Menswear Association (YMA) Fashion Scholarship Fund (FSF) is the premier educational fashion non-profit in the United States. FSF offers scholarships to the best and brightest students seeking business, technology and design careers in the fashion industry.

Cheryl Bridges, adjunct professor of marketing at Mays,  teaches the Advanced Retail Case Study course (MKTG 426). She said the advanced retail case study course is designed to challenge each student to “use critical thinking to develop a business plan that is both viable and creative providing financial and marketing solutions.” The class is part of the certificate in retailing curriculum through the Center for Retailing Studies.

Students evaluated the recent partnership between Etsy, an online marketplace for selling and buying unique goods, and Macy’s – the 159 year-old chain. To combat the trend of successful sellers leaving the site, Etsy Manufacturing, it opened The Etsy Shop at Macy’s Herald Square. This gave Etsy sellers physical store space at one of America’s busiest and famous department stores. The partnership also allowed Macy’s an assortment of artisanal products that many millennials desire.

Students were asked to (1) identify the end-use customer the collaboration should target and (2) identify Etsy sellers who would create the most demand. By envisioning their role as the Director of Special Merchandising Projects at Macy’s, they also developed a marketing campaign and six-month financial plan for The Etsy Shop.

In total, 229 students were selected out of 569 applications from 58 schools, including Cornell, University of California-Berkeley, FIT-Fashion Institute of Technology and the Wharton School of Business.

Each winner will receive a $5,000 scholarship and will travel to New York City in January to be recognized at a formal awards gala. The scholarship also guarantees a fashion internship in New York City during the summer 2017.

Bridges and the eight scholarship recipients network with over 1,500 executives, including influential fashion designers, retail CEOs and top manufacturer brands.

 Texas A&M University has been recognized in the top 10 percent of universities across the country for having the most winners. Since 2012, FSF has awarded 35 scholarships to Mays Business School students, totaling $175,000.

2017 Scholarship Recipients:

  • Leslie Bonorden, Marketing ’18
  • Loryn Setterquist, Business Honors ’18
  • Alex Marks, Marketing ’18
  • Tori Kloeppel, Supply Chain Management ’17
  • Sarah Stroup, Business Honors/Marketing ’17
  • Frances Uzoukwu, Marketing ’17
  • Riden Reiter, Marketing ’17
  • Tess Williamson, Marketing ’17

Categories: Centers, Departments, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

texas-retailers-association

The Texas Retailers Association (TRA) hosted its first Independent Retail Business Breakfast for Bryan-College Station store managers and owners Nov. 2 at Texas A&M University’s Startup Aggieland.

As the “voice of retail in Texas,” the organization is led by George Kelemen, president and CEO, who spent 11 years in Washington, D.C., and most recently served as the senior vice president of government and political affairs at Airports Council International.

…Read more

Categories: Centers, Departments, Featured Stories, Marketing, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M

The annual Retailing Summit, hosted by Texas A&M University’s Center for Retailing Studies (CRS) at the Westin Galleria Dallas, united retailers from across the United States and Taiwan. The CRS is based at Mays Business School.

On Oct. 13-14, executives from PetSmart, Walmart, Fishpeople Seafood, Carter’s, the Dallas Cowboys, Learfield, Tuesday Morning, Bridgestone, CVS Health, Groove Jones and newly formed Mizzen+Main discussed “driving customer-centric retail.”

Becoming the trusted partner to pet parents and pets 

Kicking off the first day, Eran Cohen, a 30+ year fashion veteran and current Executive Vice President of Customer Experience at PetSmart outlined the “big dog” retailer’s approach to creating a customer-centric world.

As the #1 specialty retailer in a $64 billion dollar pet industry, PetSmart has a wide portfolio that includes more than 1,500 stores in the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico.

…Read more

Categories: Centers, Departments, Featured Stories, Marketing, Mays Business, News, Programs, Spotlights, Texas A&M

30003351720_4583b600c2_oFew professionals can say they’ve been with the same company their entire career. But Gina Luna ’95, chairman of JPMorgan Chase in the Houston region, is an exception.

Luna has been with JPMorgan Chase since she graduated from Texas A&M in 1995. On her visit to Mays Business School, she had lunch with Business Honors students and shared how she has navigated such a large corporation for so many years. For more than 20 years, her willingness to plunge into new challenges and optimism about new relationships has guided her through positions in finance, recruiting, operations and marketing.

Luna leads the Middle Market Banking business and is active in recruiting, mentoring and leadership development within the organization. “I’ve held many challenging but rewarding roles at JPMorgan Chase,” Luna said, “Each one has taught me something new and has been a wonderful opportunity to build relationships.”

She believes the challenge is always worth it because of her coworkers. “Every day I get to work with such high-caliber, intelligent individuals.” …Read more

Categories: Alumni, Business Honors, Departments, Executive Speakers, Featured Stories, Finance, Management, Mays Business, News, Programs, Texas A&M

The Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship (CNVE) has recently been restructured. Don Lewis has been appointed as director of the Blackstone LaunchPad Initiative at Texas A&M University.

Chuck Hinton, who works with the NSF I-Corps program at Startup Aggieland, will assume many of the responsibilities of the assistant director of Startup Aggieland. He will also continue to serve the National Science Foundation’s Innovative Corps (I-Corps) program.

Earlier this year, the Blackstone Charitable Foundation expanded its campus entrepreneurship program to include Texas A&M University along with the University of Texas at Austin and The University of Texas at Dallas. Established by the foundation’s three-year, $3 million grant, the partnership between the three institutions will introduce entrepreneurship as a viable career option and offer opportunities to the universities’ 130,000 students, regardless of major, with a network of venture coaches and an entrepreneurial support system. The CNVE was tasked with leading the initiative across campus.

The goals of the initiative are to identify 10 percent of the student body and engage them in a meaningful way in the entrepreneurial ecosystem on campus, from one-on-one mentoring to entrepreneurial-oriented events and more.

Categories: Centers, Departments, Management, Mays Business, News, Staff, Startup Aggieland, Texas A&M

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Ben Welch

To strengthen ties with its corporate partners in the Dallas/Fort Worth market, Texas A&M’s Mays Business School hosted more than 60 companies at AT&T Stadium – home of the Dallas Cowboys – on Sept. 23.

The focus of the reception and networking event was to explore opportunities with the Center for Executive Development (CED) at Mays.

Texas A&M University President Michael K. Young, Mays Dean Eli Jones and Mays Assistant Dean for Executive Education Ben Welch spoke of the importance of lifelong learning and how Mays Business School is stepping up to provide it.

The CED offers executive certificates in business essentials, energy, health care, construction and cyber data in programs at the College Station campus and on the sites of the clients around the world. The programs are geared toward individuals who are serving in managerial/leadership roles who would like to refine their higher-level business skills and those who are preparing to enter a management-level position.

Young said the high caliber and strong work ethic of Texas A&M students and faculty have affirmed his decision to come here 18 months ago. He called it a “unique and extraordinary institution,” where the work the faculty is doing is of global import. “They are going to teach you how to use the knowledge and how to work with others. The students come to this university wanting to be citizens of substance, and they’re working with faculty members who feel the same way.”

The event was part of an expanded outreach to Mays alumni and corporate partners. The guests were corporate leaders from the Dallas area, and Jones said the business school partners with corporate leaders. “You’re here because you’re curious and you want to take your organization to the next level,” he said. “We at Mays can help you do that.”

Mays recently set a vision to  “advance the world’s prosperity,” building on three Grand Challenges: Entrepreneurship, energy and healthcare. Faculty members with expertise in those areas were available at the Dallas event to visit with the guests about how Mays is addressing them.

In his keynote speech, Welch – who has led the CED since 1990 – described five things that will guarantee return on investment: Priorities, respect, integrity, determination and enthusiasm. He said it is essential that each person express his priorities to those around him.

He targeted his message to the executives in the room who are developing their employees. “We want you to come away with what is integral at Texas A&M, and that is these five characteristics,” he said. “We want you to look at partnering with Mays Business School for one day, five days or a series of classes.”

Welch described the Leading Champions Program, a new experiential learning program that will launch in April. Mays and the Texas A&M Athletics Department are partnering to give participants exclusive access to athletic staff, facilities and social events. Enrollment will be limited to 30 people, and a highlight of the event was a drawing in which Debbie Hinson from Accenture received a free enrollment to the program.

Nancy Cramer, who received a bachelor’s degree in marketing in 1984 and is now president of Dallas-based Correct Course Consulting, said she enjoyed meeting with Mays leaders and learning about the school’s programs. “I look forward to renewing my relationships with the school and connecting with the students and faculty there,” she said.

 

Categories: Centers, Departments, Faculty, Mays Business, News, Staff, Students, Texas A&M

In the first CurrentlyMAYS session, the four deans of Mays Business School discussed current events from their various perspectives. Most of their conversation with students centered on a case study using Mays as a business model. The players were Dean Eli Jones as CEO, Executive Associate Dean Duane Ireland as COO, and Associate Dean for Graduate Programs Arvind Mahajan and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs Martha Loudder as division heads.
currently-maysModerator Sandra Lampo, a clinical associate professor of marketing, said any successful business requires all the various disciplines. Jones concurred, and said, “This is one of the most complicated businesses I have encountered. There is usually a clear line of sight to the ultimate customer. What makes this business exciting and a challenge is there is not clear single customer.”
Some customers include the Texas Legislature, which helps fund the school financially; students who are enrolled; parents who are invested; prospective employers; faculty and staff who support the programs; the Texas A&M University campus; and the state of Texas.

“Professors and administrators are in the business of knowledge,” Loudder said. “In our business, we create new knowledge through research. Each of us start as professors with a narrow, technical expertise in our own fields. But as we advance in our careers and moved into administrative positions, we have understand the big picture and broaden our horizons to better understand other fields.”

The deans advised students that they can stay current by keeping with news outlets such as The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. Mahajan suggested reading news from outlets that give different political perspectives than his own. “It will force you to challenge your own biases, opinions and beliefs.”

Ireland added: “Find one or two news sources in which you have great confidence and read those often. Soon you’ll pick up on the cadence of the writing and be able to efficiently process the things you are reading.”

Ireland also recommended that the students increase the breadth of individuals with whom they interact. “In management, we talk a lot about strong and weak ties. We value strong ties as our close relationships with others, but even weak ties can be valuable opportunities through which you can have sporadic interaction with people different from yourself.”

Junior finance major Andrew Hitscherich said he appreciated that the deans took time to share their wisdom with students and their vision for transformational leaders at Mays. “I’m looking forward to seeing where Mays is headed,” he said.

Senior PPA and business student Sarah Burns said the deans inspired her and other students to pursue a global, well-rounded mindset. She said she appreciated the cross-functional education at Mays. “We have incredible leaders at all levels behind the scenes of Mays’ success,” she said. “It was really special that the deans took the time to answer our questions, ask for our input, and discuss with us one on one.”

Categories: Dean Eli Jones, Departments, Faculty, Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M