The 2016 Texas A&M Advertising team, also known as Good Bull Advertising, won a silver award at the 2017 AAF-Houston ADDYs in the category of collateral material. Founded in 1960, the ADDY Award is the world’s largest professional advertising competition and is sponsored by the American Advertising Federation.

In April 2016, Good Bull Advertising competed in the AAF’s National Student Advertising Competition, placing third at regionals. The plan book from this competition served as the collateral material for the 2017 ADDY Awards, held in March of this year. It involved a 27-page professional brochure detailing a complete $50 million advertising campaign for Snapple.

Lisa Troy, clinical professor of marketing, serves as the advertising team’s faculty advisor and teaches a two-semester course preparing students for this event each year.

The team members were Ashlyn Beckmann, Oren Mandelbaum, Holly Boyles, Angela Mats, Cassidy Caddenhead, Laura McCloskey, Julia Gaas, Megan Milstead, Marissita Garcia, Alyssa Osterhaut, Michelle Griffith, Angelica Perez, Pablo Haddad, Leah Rheinlander, Victoria Henson, Zachary Rother, Kati Hewitt, Catherine Scalf, Bailey Lee and Dejanay Tippens.

Categories: Departments, Marketing, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

Good Bull Advertising, an agency team of 20 students in Clinical Professor of Marketing Lisa C. Troy’s advanced advertising class at Texas A&M University, placed fourth in the district level American Advertising Association’s National Student Advertising Competition. Held in Fort Worth, Texas April 5-7, the competition involved a case study outlined by the current year’s corporate sponsor, Tai Pei Foods.

Students spent two full semesters researching and building a $15 million, fully integrated marketing campaign, preparing a professional quality campaign plan book and presenting the plan to judges at the competition. Over 150 schools across the country participate in the event each year and the Tenth District, in which Texas A&M participates, is one of the most competitive.

To market Tai Pei to 18- to 25-year-olds in the U.S., the team developed a new brand character and slogan, “Good Fortune Awaits.” Digital ads and a video execution reflecting the campaign theme were created and supported by a number of promotional tactics, including retail activations, promotional events and a partnership with Feeding America.

The team included students Mitchell Bausch, Mackenzie Borman, Rachel Bush, Elijah Cantrell, Mary Chacko, Mary Devillez, Dereka Dunn, Laura Eller, Gabriela Estrada, Brooke Gadjica, Caylin Godfrey, Calli Godwin, Divya Govil, Justin Hairston, Alexis Hanson, Kaitlin Hernandez, Anastasia Ivanova, Anna Kuczmanski, Victoria McLaughlin, Claire Metzger, Dillon Moore, MK Mountjoy, Emily Nero, Lami Olonilua, Alaina Omar, Alyssa Osterhout, Riden Reiter, Bailey Wood and Robby Young.

The 2018 Good Bull Advertising team will form in the fall to prepare for next year’s competition.

Categories: Marketing, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

On March 24, Mays Business School hosted the 2017 Mays Marketing Research Camp, chaired by the Center for Retailing Studies Research Director and Coleman Professor of Marketing Venky Shankar.

In its 11th year, the event presents faculty the opportunity to share, hear and collaborate with some of the top scholars in marketing on the latest empirical, analytical and behavioral research.

Together, the four papers presented by faculty experts from Cornell University’s Johnson School of Management, University of Madison-Wisconsin’s School of Business, University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business and Mays Business School demonstrated how relevant research can advance the world’s prosperity. …Read more

Categories: Featured Stories, Marketing, Mays Business, News, Research, Research Notes, Texas A&M

Healthcare customers are a unique type of consumer reluctant to purchase, at risk and often highly stressed. During a visit with business students in the Improving Service Quality in Healthcare course, J.R. Thomas, executive vice president of Optum, shared some of the complicated challenges healthcare providers face today.

The visit was the second day of a trip to Mays for Thomas and Optum senior executives Doug Hansen ’89, Allison Miller ’99 and Kevin Kuhn. The first day, Thomas presented to Business Honors students in the Executive Speaker Series, followed by a networking session and student dinner sponsored by Optum. The second day Thomas and his team members from Optum spoke with MBA students and to students from the School of Public Health.

Leonard Berry, University Distinguished Professor of Marketing, taught the lecture for the Improving Service Quality in Healthcare course discussion and facilitated discussion between students and their visitors. The focus on Healthcare is one of Mays’ Grand Challenges.

Managing stress

In the discussion, Thomas underscored one of the most important issues facing healthcare providers: stress. “Patients and their families are faced with life-altering decisions, nurses and doctors work long hours and endure emotional exhaustion to provide the best service possible, and management is stressed with striking a balance between good will toward those who can’t afford expensive healthcare and staying in business,” he said.

The key, he said, is to remember that patients are more than customers; they’re people. He provided an example of an end-of life scenario: “If a patient is dying, it’s important to personally talk to the family. Give them your instinct. You can’t always prevent death, but you can control how it will happen.”

He elaborated on another complex situation: “Some customers can’t always afford healthcare. But remember you also owe it to patients to stay in business.”

Technology creates new challenges, opportunities

Thomas also shared how technology is changing the landscape of medicine. “Routine visits and checkups for common maladies are moving towards telemedicine, such as simple phone calls instead of expensive in-office visits,” he said. “But for the more serious cases, the value of a personal touch in an in-person visit will never go away. Patients need that.”

Marketing senior Rachel Claggett said she was impressed by the amount of involvement the business side of healthcare has in the lives of patients. “It’s reassuring to know that there is humanity and passion in this industry – it’s not just about profits.”

Thomas received his master’s of business administration focusing on finance and management at the University of Texas at Austin. He also holds a bachelor’s degree in zoology from the University of Arkansas.

Categories: Business Honors, Executive Speakers, Former Students, Health Care, Marketing, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

The saying goes that everything is bigger in Texas, and in the case of the inaugural Spirit of Texas Festival, it couldn’t be any truer. The free festival aims to round up Guinness World Records in Aggieland for the largest serving of chili and Frito pie and largest Texas two-step.

That’s 5,000 pounds of chili and 4,000 boots.

To accomplish this feat, the festival has recruited Mays Business School’s Department of Marketing to help publicize the event, which will be March 2-5 at Wolf Pen Creek Park in College Station.

More than 100 Mays marketing students have worked with event organizer Cynthia Caronna to coordinate the festival’s social media, facilitate vendor relations and media partnerships and create a promotional magazine and other collateral. Caronna said she has been impressed by the hard work of the students. “This is truly giving back – building something that will outlive them,” she said. “It is a new tradition that will give them pride, much like the Aggie Ring does.”

In addition, the spring semester Services Marketing course, taught by Clinical Marketing Professor Janet Parish, will audit the entire 2017 event and provide recommendations for the 2018 Festival. She said this has been the largest-scale project marketing students have been involved in.

Pi Sigma Epsilon, a professional fraternity for students in marketing and sales management, advised by marketing faculty advisor Andrew Loring, has sold magazine ads and sponsorships for the event.

The event will also feature food trucks, a barbecue cook-off, a pie contest, car and bike shows, a marketplace of more than 200 antique and craft vendors, and live entertainment, and will benefit the Ronald McDonald House, Mobility Worldwide, K9s4Cops and other local charities.

For more information, go to https://sotfair.com/ or call 979-571-8891.

 

Categories: Marketing, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

The Texas A&M University Institute for Advanced Studies (TIAS), Mays Business School and the Department of Marketing are hosting a reception on Feb. 23 to welcome TIAS Faculty Fellow V. Kumar (VK).

During the reception, VK will share comments about the directions in which his work is heading. In addition to marketing, his research connects to a variety of scholarly fields, including information systems, computer science, finance, accounting and health care.

The reception will be 3-5 p.m. in Cocanougher Center (Wehner 183), with formal comments by VK at 3:30 p.m. Pay parking is available in Lot 72 off Olsen Boulevard (UB accepted).

VK is the Regents Professor; Richard and Susan Lenny Distinguished Chair Professor of Marketing; executive director of the Center for Excellence in Brand & Customer Management; and Ph.D. program director at the J. Mack Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University. He also is the Chang Jiang Scholar at Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China. He has been recognized with 14 lifetime achievement awards in several areas of marketing from the American Marketing Association (AMA) and other professional organizations.

He has been honored in multiple countries with prestigious awards and fellowships, including the Chang Jiang Scholar, HUST, China; Lee Kong Chian Fellow, Singapore Management University, Singapore; Indian School of Business Senior Fellow, India. He spends his “free” time visiting business leaders to identify challenging problems to solve. VK has worked with several Global Fortune 1000 firms to maximize their profits and publish studies with rigor and relevance.

He has published more than 250 articles and 25 books (translated in multiple languages), and has received more than 25 research and teaching excellence awards. He is the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Marketing and in 2017, was recognized as a Fellow of AMA. In 2017, he has been chosen as a “Legend in Marketing,” where his work is published in a 10-volume encyclopedia with commentaries from scholars worldwide.

There are 10 scholars in the 2016-17 class of Faculty Fellows. TIAS was established in December 2010 by The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents to build on the growing academic reputation of Texas A&M and to provide a framework to attract top scholars from throughout the nation and abroad for appointments of up to a year. The selection of Faculty Fellows initiates with faculty nominations of National Academies and Nobel Prize-caliber scholars who align with existing strengths and ambitions of the University. To learn more, visit http://tias.tamu.edu.

Categories: Marketing, Mays Business, Texas A&M

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School has named three of its most distinguished former students as 2017 Outstanding Alumni. The honorees are Gregory M. Cokinos ’79, Cydney Collier Donnell ’81 and Carri Baker ’84. They will be honored at the 25th-Year Outstanding Alumni Awards Dinner on April 6.

Mays Business School honors graduates who have led lives of distinction and who embody the Aggie core values – loyalty, integrity, excellence, leadership, selfless service and respect – with the Mays Outstanding Alumni Award. Recipients come from all industries, have been active in their communities and continue to serve their alma mater. The recipients learned of their honor when surprised in their places of business and other locations by a group of Mays Business School representatives, including Dean Eli Jones.

“Mays Business School’s 2017 Outstanding Alumni are great examples of Mays Transformational Leaders: Responsible, ethical leaders with entrepreneurial mindsets and vision, who have strong business competencies and personify selfless service,” Jones said. “Here at Mays, we have no shortage of leaders who have excelled beyond their college careers and who help advance the world’s prosperity. We are pleased to recognize and celebrate them at our annual awards dinner.”

To date, the school has honored 79 former students who have made outstanding contributions in their chosen fields with significant impact, innovation and influence at the school, in their community and beyond.

Gregory M. Cokinos ’79 is co-founder of Houston-based Cokinos, Bosien & Young, the largest law firm in Texas focusing on construction and engineering law. He has been named as one of The Top 100 Super Lawyers in the State of Texas by Texas Monthly every year since 2007. He was instrumental in the creation of the Construction Law Journal and has been the Journal’s editor since its inception. He is also an arbitrator for the American Arbitration Association. He is a graduate of the Department of Management.

Cydney Collier Donnell ’81 is the Julio S. LaGuarta Professor in Real Estate, executive professor and associate department head of finance at Mays where she teaches graduate level classes in real estate capital markets. She is also the present Director of Real Estate Programs overseeing the Master of Real Estate Program and undergraduate real estate finance classes. Prior to this, she was the Managing Director for European Investors, Inc. in New York City, where she managed more than $3 billion in real estate securities on behalf of U.S. pension funds, foundations, endowments and high-net-worth clients. She is a graduate of the Department of Finance.

Carri Baker ’84 has served for 32 years as a key executive and chief operations officer for San Antonio-based Linebarger Goggan Blair & Sampson, a nationally recognized law firm representing governments and school districts throughout the U.S. Her civic leadership has made a significant impact in the education, health and economic development of San Antonio. She currently serves on the Dean’s Advisory Board for Mays, and the Chancellor’s Century Council and the President’s Advisory Board for Texas A&M San Antonio. She is a graduate of the Department of Marketing.

Categories: Alumni, Dean Eli Jones, Finance, Management, Marketing, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M

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Escalators may be quick, convenient and even fun, but according to Rory Vaden, author of Take the Stairs, they aren’t the fastest route to getting ahead. The New York Times best-selling author recently spoke to students at Mays Business School about the virtues of taking the stairs in an “escalator world.”

“We live in a society of shortcuts and procrastination,” Vaden told a packed Ray Auditorium on Wednesday, the second group of Mays marketing students of the day. “When faced with the decision to ride an escalator (the easy route) or take the stairs (the hard route), most people choose the path of least resistance.”

Vaden’s appearance was a team effort. Ron Lamb, president of Reynolds & Reynolds the first founding partner of the Professional Selling Initiative (PSI) at Mays had introduced PSI Director and Marketing Clinical Professor Janet Parish to Vaden’s works. “After reading the books, I was so moved that I led a special topics course with 13 students to study the books,” Parish said.

She told Lamb she was doing this, and he in turn told Vaden. After a chain of events and contacts, Parish invited Vaden to campus. Once he accepted, Parish asked fellow instructor Sandi Lampo to provide the audience her large marketing classes to create to biggest impact for M
ays.

Vaden is co-founder of Southwestern Consulting, a multimillion-dollar global sales consulting practice. He said part of his job is to study what makes other people successful. Throughout his career he has encountered countless successful people, from entrepreneurs to athletes to founders of large churches, and discovered the common denominator of their success. Surprisingly, he said, it had nothing to do with age, personal background or education. “The real secret is self-discipline,” Vaden said. “Successful people are those who have formed habits of doing things they know they should do even when they don’t feel like doing them.”

He recalled when he was age 10 and he complained to his mother about not enjoying martial arts and wanting to quit. His mother quipped: “Enjoying it isn’t a requirement of doing it.” From then on, he learned the value of following through with anything painful, uncomfortable or even boring. “It’s not just about making your life
as hard as possible,” Vaden said. “Difficult short-term choices lead to easy long-term consequences.”

Vaden said he believes success is never a one-and-done deal. It comes at a daily price. He summed it up with what he calls the “Rent Axiom:” “Success is never owned. It is only rented and the rent is due every day.”

Categories: Marketing, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M

len-berrycroppedLeonard Berry, a marketing professor at Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School, has stepped up his research of cancer care to encompass those closest to the cancer patients – the caregivers. Most often, the caregivers are family members, and are not professionals at caring for patients.

His paper, “Supporting the Supporters: What Family Caregivers Need to Care for a Loved One With Cancer,” is online and will be in the January print issue of Journal of Oncology Practice. The journal is one of the two journals published by the American Society of Clinical Oncology. It is widely read in the oncology community.

“It is an article that I am especially proud of because it addresses a real need to better prepare and support the family caregivers of cancer patients in their caregiving roles,” Berry said. “This is a group that is often overlooked, even though the caregiver is an extension of the medical team.”

Berry’s co-authors are Shraddha Mahesh Dalwadi, who earned her MBA from Mays and is a fourth-year medical student at Texas A&M; and Dr. Joseph O. Jacobson of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School.

The researchers propose a four-part framework for supporting family caregivers:

– Assess caregivers’ needs using formal measures, just as the cancer patient’s own needs are assessed;

– Educate caregivers for their caregiving roles, most notably, with training in the low-level medical support that cancer patients require at home;

– Empower caregivers to become full-fledged members of the patient’s cancer team, all working toward common goals;

– Assist caregivers proactively in their duties, so that they retain a sense of control and self-efficacy rather than having to react to imminent medical crises without sufficient resources at their disposal.

An estimated 4.6 million people in the United States care for someone with cancer at home. Too often, these caregivers—spouses, other family members, or friends—are poorly prepared for this vital but demanding role that takes a toll on them and, by extension, the patient. Only one-third of all caregivers report being asked by a health-care provider what they need to care for the patient; even fewer are asked what they need to care for themselves. That lack of preparation can worsen the anxiety that caregivers already feel about a loved one’s health.

An at-home caregiver typically provides the patient with cancer with at least four types of assistance: daily living activities, medical care, social support and advocacy.

The psychological burden may be even greater for family caregivers than for the patient, especially as the disease advances, and greater for female than for male caregivers. Stress is particularly heavy if caregivers feel ill-prepared: a sense of low self-efficacy heightens the perceived burden, so it is important to develop self-confidence for the caregiving role.

Berry is University Distinguished Professor of Marketing, Regents Professor, and holds the M.B. Zale Chair in Retailing and Marketing Leadership in the Mays Business School at Texas A&M University. He also is a Presidential Professor for Teaching Excellence.

His research has focused on service, particularly in health care, and in recent years more specifically on cancer care.

“I became interested in studying service improvement in cancer care because we are making more progress on clinical care than service care, and when cancer strikes, patients and their families need both,” Berry said. “I am able to leverage my career background as a services researcher and the past 15 years intensively studying healthcare to contribute to our thinking about trying to ease the path for cancer patients and their families.”

As a visiting scientist at Mayo Clinic in 2001-2002, he conducted an in-depth research study of healthcare service, the basis for his book, Management Lessons from Mayo Clinic (2008).  He also has conducted and published field research at Gundersen Health, ThedaCare and Bellin Health, three high-performance health systems in Wisconsin. Concurrent with his faculty position in Mays Business School, Berry is a senior fellow of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement studying service improvement in cancer care for patients and their families.

Berry has written 10 books in all, including Discovering the Soul of Service; On Great Service; Marketing Services: Competing Through Quality; and Delivering Quality Service. He is the author of numerous academic articles and an invited lecturer throughout the world.

 

Categories: Faculty, Featured Stories, Health Care, Marketing, Mays Business, News, Research, Texas A&M

By Venky Shankar

Coleman Chair Professor in Marketing at Mays Business School;facstaff_shankarv
Director of Research, Center for Retailing Studies

Black Friday and Cyber Monday are only days away. So how does this year’s retail shopping season look? All estimates point to a bullish holiday season.

The National Retail Federation (NRF) predicts retail holiday sales to be $656 billion, the International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC) projects them to be $684 billion; and Deloitte Consulting is even more optimistic, pegging sales at $1 trillion. Depending on the estimate, the expected growth rate over last year ranges from 3 to 4.4 percent. Retail holiday e-commerce is anticipated to range from $91.6 billion (Adobe Digital Insights [ADI]) to $98 billion (Deloitte Consulting). Much of the holiday shopping will come from a large number of shoppers making small purchases. An overwhelming majority of shoppers (78 percent) will be spending less than $1,000 during the holidays (Qualtrics).

…Read more

Categories: Centers, Faculty, Featured Stories, Marketing, Mays Business, News, Programs, Texas A&M