The Executive MBA program at Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School maintains its place among the top 10 programs offered exclusively by U.S. public universities in the U.S., according to the 2017 rankings released Monday by Financial Times.

“We are proud to be ranked as a top public Executive MBA Program in the state of Texas and a Top 10 public program in the nation,” said Eli Jones, dean of Mays Business School. “This significant achievement reflects the strength and dedication of the Mays Business School faculty and staff to create visionary leaders. Mays is making a positive impact on the communities we serve through the strong accomplishments of our seasoned executives.”

This year’s rankings are based on feedback from the Class of 2014. The Mays Executive MBA Program ranked 10th among public schools located exclusively in the U.S and in the Top 25 among all public/private schools in the U.S.

In addition, the Mays program ranked 1st in work experience among U.S. public institutions (2nd among public/private). It has developed a reputation for attracting seasoned talent as well as high performers identified by their organizations.

Mays fared well in the 2017 Financial Times rankings in other areas as well. Based on the research productivity in the top journals in business, Mays faculty ranked 7th among U.S. public schools and 14th among U.S. public/private.

For nearly 20 years, Mays has offered its top-ranked Executive MBA in Houston. The two-year program meets on alternating weekends in Houston – leaving students time for important work-life balance. In class, students learn from faculty experts at Mays who are renowned for their research and passionate about teaching.

“We are proud to be the only school in Houston to be ranked by Financial Times. Through our program, students become better decision makers and gain the confidence for top leadership positions,” says Julie Orzabal, program director.

 

ABOUT MAYS

At Mays Business School, we step up to advance the world’s prosperity. Our mission is to be a vibrant learning organization that creates impactful knowledge and develops transformational leaders. Mays Business School educates more than 6,400 undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its programs and for faculty research.

Categories: Alumni, Dean Eli Jones, Featured Stories, Mays Business, MBA, News, Staff, Texas A&M

Attributing his current success to what he learned during his time at Texas A&M University, Tim Meyer was ready to share some of that knowledge when he recently visited with Mays Business Honors students as part of the Mays 2017 Transformational Leader Speaker Series.

“Stay disciplined in this field” seemed to be the common theme Meyer conveyed throughout the duration of the session. Meyer is a co-founder and managing partner at Angeles Equity Partners, and is responsible for overseeing all aspects for the firm’s investment activities. He received his Bachelor’s degree in finance from Texas A&M and an MBA with a concentration in entrepreneurial finance from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

Meyer knew the value in sharing his decision to return to school to pursue his MBA, enlightening the students on how he went back to school without being sponsored by the firm he had been working for at the time. He then gave students a rule of thumb for planning when he said, “if you get into a top 5 school for your MBA, go, regardless of money. If it’s not a top 5 B-school, try to see if you get sponsored by your company/firm first.”

…Read more

Categories: Alumni, Business Honors, Finance, Former Students, Mays Business, MBA, News, Students, Texas A&M

Health and well-being company Humana Inc. (NYSE: HUM) and Mays Business School at Texas A&M University are launching the first healthcare analytics case competition at the university’s campus to showcase students’ analytical abilities to solve a real-world business problem. The case competition is open to all accredited colleges in the United States.

Students enrolled full-time in accredited Master of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Information Systems, Master of Public Health or Master of Business Administration programs at an educational institution based in the United States are eligible to enter. Students are invited to join in groups of two to three students—from the same school—to tackle a real-world case that will be announced in October.

The deadline for participants to submit their completed analyses will be Oct. 27 by 11:59 p.m. CT. Five finalists will then present their analyses to an executive panel at Texas A&M’s Mays Business School on Nov. 9, with the winner being selected immediately afterward.

…Read more

Categories: Featured Stories, Health Care, Mays Business, MBA, MS Business, News, Research, Students, Texas A&M

Mays Business School’s Full-Time MBA program ranked in the top 10 among U.S. public programs at 7th among U.S. public schools and 20th overall in the 2017 Forbes “Best Business Schools” ranking. This reflects an improvement of four positions in the overall rankings and two positions in the U.S. public universities from the ranking in 2015.

The Forbes ranking reflects return on investment – the salary alumni earn over five years as compared to the cost of the MBA program. The results are based on a comparison of alumni earnings in their first five years out of business school to their opportunity cost. To learn more about the ranking and methodology, visit https://www.forbes.com/business-schools/.

The Mays MBA Program is considered a leader in academics and in return on investment. In addition, Forbes ranks Texas A&M’s Mays Business School as 1st in all U.S. schools in years to payback – at 3.6 years. The accelerated pace of the 18-month Full-Time MBA program and Mays’ commitment to providing competitive scholarships result in a high-caliber MBA education at an affordable cost.

“This is a confirmation of the commitment to excellence by our MBA faculty, staff, students, and former students,” said Eli Jones, dean of Mays Business School. “The lessons learned at Mays are priceless, and the specific skills are organic to each class.”

He added: “I know the impact the program makes on lives. The Mays MBA Program certainly transformed my life.”

Shannon Deer, director of the Full-Time MBA Program, echoed his sentiment. “The decisions we make on a day-to-day basis are gauged upon whether they provide value to the students and the employers who hire them,” she said. “The MBA program is a key element in the vibrant learning organization that is Mays Business School.”

Texas A&M University President Michael K. Young added his congratulations to the Mays Full-Time MBA Program for continuing an upward trajectory. “The feat of holding a top-10 spot is not an easy one,” he said. “Mays Business School is striking the balance of growing our future leaders while offering an excellent education at an affordable cost.”

About Mays Business School

Mays is a full-service business school that steps up to advance the world’s prosperity. Our mission is to be a vibrant learning organization that creates impactful knowledge and develops transformational leaders. Mays Business School educates more than 6,404 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its programs and for faculty research.

 

 

Categories: Dean Eli Jones, Featured Stories, Mays Business, MBA, News, Texas A&M

Most people rely on gauging facial expressions to build rapport with a new acquaintance. However, Steven Maldonado ’18 knows firsthand that looks can be deceiving. He cannot make one of the most common friendly gestures – a smile – because of facial paralysis caused by Moebius syndrome.

Maldonado, who attends Mays Business School’s Professional MBA program in Houston’s CityCentre, is an emerging leader in the national Moebius community. As a featured speaker at Baylor College of Medicine’s 2017 Compassion and the Art of Medicine series in September, he will share the lessons he’s learned from living with this neurological disorder.

Learning to connect with others

The Houston native was born with Moebius syndrome, but doctors did not diagnosis the rarely-seen condition until he was a child. Researchers estimate the non-progressive condition affects fewer than 20 in every 1 million people. Besides facial paralysis, this condition in some cases can result in respiratory problems, speech and swallowing disorders, visual impairment, sensory integration dysfunction, sleep disorders, weak upper body strength and autism spectrum disorders.

Maldonado said the condition contributed to his being socially awkward during his early years. The shy and reserved child had to learn to use different skills, such as humor, to build rapport. However, with practice, he was able to forge strong friendships.

Over the years, the condition has led to many life lessons. “Everyone is different in their own way,” Maldonado said. “Having compassion for others is a great thing. I’ve learned that you shouldn’t judge people on their looks, how they talk or where they come from.”

A drive to excel personally and professionally

After earning a business degree from the University of Houston, Maldonado worked for a company that did consulting on environmental issues. Eventually he switched industries and joined Baylor College of Medicine’s Department of Immunology, Allergy and Rheumatology. The administrative coordinator works with the department’s research grants, financial budgeting, and special projects.

Maldonado’s decision to pursue a master’s degree was based on his desire to advance professionally and grow as an individual. Mays’ Professional MBA program stood out for a variety of reasons. “The faculty and the staff made me feel like I was the only person applying for the program,” he said. “They were really personable and always ready to address my concerns. They really made me feel that I was going to be adding value to the program by coming to Mays.”

He credits the graduate program with helping him increase his confidence, become a better speaker and have the knowledge to tackle complex problems. He will use these skills as he prepares to give his first formal speech at the Baylor College of Medicine event.

Raising awareness and helping others

Maldonado also is planning to increase his involvement with the Moebius Syndrome Foundation. After attending his first conference in 2014, Maldonado now serves as the first point of contact for young adults who have Moebius syndrome. In that volunteer role, he helps them connect with other people with the condition.

Eventually, Maldonado hopes to serve on the organization’s board of directors. “Moebius has its challenges and obstacles,” he said. “However, I believe people with Moebius can lead pretty normal lives.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Featured Stories, Mays Business, MBA, News, Spotlights, Students, Texas A&M

Texas A&M University is tied with the University of Michigan for having the most graduates currently serving as CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, according to a new Fortune magazine study.

With four former students serving as CEOs of some of the largest companies in the United States, Texas A&M has the most of any university in Texas and is only matched by the University of Michigan. Other schools on the Fortune list include Cornell University and Harvard University, both with three CEO graduates.

Texas A&M also is the only Texas school in the survey with a CEO on Fortune’s Top Ten list. Darren Woods, CEO and chairman of Exxon Mobil, studied electrical engineering at Texas A&M and is a 1987 graduate. His wife, Kathryn Woods, is also a 1987 Texas A&M graduate who earned a degree in accounting from Mays Business School.

This year’s Fortune list also includes Bruce D. Broussard, CEO of Humana, Class of 1984; David M. Cordani, CEO of Cigna, Class of 1988. Both Broussard and Cordani earned degrees in accounting from Mays Business School.

“Texas A&M has always been committed to developing leaders of character and the mission of Mays Business School is to develop transformational leaders,” says James Benjamin, head of the department of accounting at Mays Business School. “Beyond that, accounting is often referred to the language of business and graduates are well positioned for success is all aspects of organizations. Both Mr. Broussard and Mr. Cordani worked as auditors with major public accounting firms and became CPA’s before transitioning to the corporate world. Many believe that the discipline and work ethic required in public accounting provides good preparation for leadership roles in business.”

Not included in this year’s survey is Jeff Miller, who was recently appointed as president and CEO of Halliburton Co.  Miller received an MBA from Mays Business School in 1988.

Read more here: http://today.tamu.edu/2017/07/05/texas-am-heads-fortune-magazine-ceo-list/

Categories: Accounting, Alumni, Departments, Entrepreneurship, Featured Stories, Former Students, Mays Business, MBA, News, Texas A&M

Willie Dennis, a Class of 2018 Full-Time MBA candidate at Mays Business School, was named among the 2017 scholarship recipients of the Texas Business Hall of Fame (TBHF). He was awarded $15,000.

According to TBHF guidelines, eligible candidates for the scholarship exhibit entrepreneurial aspirations, demonstrate a propensity for leadership in academic and campus activities and entrepreneurial achievements, and have good academic credentials.

Recipients were chosen after a round of nominations and then an interview process. A final recipient for each scholarship was selected to represent each of the participating universities.

Amber Acosta, associate director of the Full-Time MBA program, described Dennis as an active and contributing member of the MBA program. “His valuable insight in the classroom is matched only by his commitment to getting a well-rounded education,” she said. “Everything Willie does, he strives to do his absolute best. I have no doubt that Willie will be in the Texas Business Hall of Fame someday. We are so proud of him for receiving this prestigious scholarship.”

Previous Mays students to win TBHF scholarships include Full-Time MBA graduate Lloyd McGuire and Business Honors and Finance major Christopher Bybee ’17.

Categories: Mays Business, MBA, News, Programs, Spotlights, Students, Texas A&M

Some Mays MBA graduates answer the question: “How has your MBA program help you see new opportunities and achieve your career goals?” 

The Mays Executive and Professional MBA Programs are held in Mays’ Houston CityCentre complex.

The Executive MBA Program is ranked in Financial Times (2016): 1st public in Texas, 1st in salaries among Texas public schools, 1st in work experience among Texas public schools,  8th U.S. public and 19th in U.S. overall. The Professional MBA Program is a rigorous 22-month program designed for working professionals who want to immediately apply the knowledge they learn in the classroom to their jobs.

Mays also offers a Full-Time MBA program at the Texas A&M University’s main campus in College Station.

Executive MBA, Class of 2017

Kayvan Zarea, Development Partner, Hanover Company

“The Mays MBA program was a highly transformative journey on both personal and professional levels. I expected professional growth but was surprised by the personal growth. I learned things about myself that no one can take away from me. Disaster City was a very insightful experience in which all of your strengths and weaknesses are immediately exposed for you and your team to analyze. It was instrumental in identifying strengths that I was unaware of, and quickly highlighted weaknesses that need further development.”

…Read more

Categories: Featured Stories, Former Students, Mays Business, MBA, News, Programs, Students, Texas A&M

By Jessie Minks ’16

On the morning of Feb. 17, the Cocanougher Center was filled with an audience of business and community leaders serving as judges, anxiously waiting to learn the mission and goal of 16 start-up companies that teamed up with the first-year students from the class of 2017’s Full-Time MBA program. Held in partnership between the Mays MBA Program and the Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship (CNVE), the 2017 MBA Venture Challenge wrapped up its 15th year with three winning teams going home with a total of $10,000.

The day kicked off with the first round: the elevator pitch competition. Pitches ranged from a simplified physical fitness booking app and streamlined water purifying approaches to emerging drone security system technology. Elevator pitch winners Eric Jensen, Matt Larsen, Zain Hanif and Ellen Schott took home $500 after impressing the judge and company representative audience with their interest-sparking and comical pitch for InfinitySoft, a scalable data analytics platform provider for the oil and gas industry.

This year’s MBA Venture Challenge contained 68 first-year MBA students tasked with assisting applicant companies with business advice and financial/competitive analysis on current and future market and growth strategies. Each year the MBA Venture Challenge creates high-stakes competition between teams, for both sponsored cash awards and significant bragging rights. Additionally, the competition provides networking opportunities as well as high-value insights for participating firms.

The Venture Challenge asks the MBA student teams to provide a clear, unbiased and business-oriented evaluation of their selected firm’s market and financial viability. The start-up firms are invited to apply from throughout the Aggie Entrepreneurship Ecosystem, and the MBA teams selected their favorite firm, based solely on a short summary provided by the applicants. The program operates through partnerships and sponsorship from the Aggie Angel Network, JB Knowledge and the Texas A&M University Division of Research. The original 26 business applicants came from a wide variety of industries, including human tissue engineering and ecommerce, adventure media and consumer products.

While the MBA teams were allotted only two weeks of direct contact with their assigned company representatives, they were provided feedback and direction from industry and university mentors, including the MBA program faculty and volunteer entrepreneurs. Full-Time MBA Program Director Shannon Deer explains “the MBA Venture Challenge encourages our students to integrate what they have learned across the business disciplines” and allows each team to “demonstrate the ability to navigate ambiguity and intellectual curiosity – two critical skills our employers seek in our students.”

The MBA Venture Challenge consisted of a full-day competition over three rounds of judging by an audience of experienced judges from CNVE’s network of business, academic and entrepreneurial community leaders. Each round required the teams to present a concise yet in-depth analysis of the start-up and provide meaningful recommendations for future company success.

“Now in its 15th year, the MBA Venture Challenge has clearly set the standard for high-intensity and high-impact interaction between student teams and startup ventures,” said Blake Petty, director of the CNVE. “The analysis provided by these outstanding MBAs has proven to be immediately invaluable to the participating companies, and there is simply no better way to expose our students to the real-life challenges of entrepreneurship than to immerse them into a startup…even if only for two weeks.”

For those companies or judges interested in participating in the 2018 MBA Venture Challenge, be on the lookout for application information to begin circulating in November 2017.

The winning MBA teams were announced Feb. 17 at a networking and awards reception immediately after the Venture Challenge:

$5,000 – First Place (sponsored by the Texas A&M Division of Research) – Brent Carter, Nick Cheng, Philip Spencer, Jana Soares; CelaCare

$3,000 – Second Place (sponsored by the Aggie Angel Network) – Mario Coll, Thomas Dowlearn, Eclair Lehmongkol, Ankur Soni; IntuiTap Medical

$2,000 – Third Place (sponsored by JBKnowledge) – Meagan Altman, James Cochran, Lia Rojas Unamo, Rahul Sharma; FireDisc

Learn more about the results of previous MBA Venture Challenge competitions.

 

Categories: Centers, Entrepreneurship, Mays Business, MBA, News, Staff, Students, Texas A&M

Ten Mays Business School students were given the MBA Scholar Award Dec. 1 – a new award designed to honor 4.0 graduates from the MBA programs. The celebration at CityCentre Houston was attended by Mays Dean Eli Jones, Associate Dean for Graduate Programs Arvind Mahajan and Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs Michael Kinney celebrated with the Executive MBA and Professional MBA Program Class of 2016 graduates.

Scholars enrolled in the Executive MBA Program were Rajee Hari and Santiago Velasquez. Scholars in the Professional MBA Program were Kenza Bouzaher, Brad Burgess, Lane Cooper, John Doolin, Shelly Fuhrman, Ashley Gibson, Tyler Stegeman and Paul Urane.

The idea for the award came from Bala Shetty, who previously was Interim Associate Dean for Graduate Programs.

MBA Scholar Award winner Brad Burgess said afterward, “The program has done so much for me and opened up many new opportunities. I look forward to helping this program grow and prosper in the future.”

To view photos of the Class of 2016 Scholars Awards Dinner visit https://www.flickr.com/photos/maysbusinessschool/sets/72157677407413586/

Categories: Alumni, Dean Eli Jones, Featured Stories, Mays Business, MBA, News, Programs, Students, Texas A&M