Lead Story

Mays moves up in Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2016 ranking of best full-time MBA programs in the U.S.

Kelli R. Levey, November 17th, 2016

mbarankingupdate

The Mays Full-Time MBA Program at Mays Business School ranked 18th overall and 4th among public schools in the “Best full-time MBA programs” rankings by Bloomberg Businessweek. The placement was up from last year’s ranking of 22nd overall and 8th among public schools.

The rankings were based on data for the class that graduated in December 2015 and from feedback from students who graduated between 2008 and 2010. Former students ranked the Mays program favorably – 13th out of 81 programs ranked. Mays also fared well in the employer and job placement categories.

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By Jessie Minks ’16

On the morning of Feb. 17, the Cocanougher Center was filled with an audience of business and community leaders serving as judges, anxiously waiting to learn the mission and goal of 16 start-up companies that teamed up with the first-year students from the class of 2017’s Full-Time MBA program. Held in partnership between the Mays MBA Program and the Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship (CNVE), the 2017 MBA Venture Challenge wrapped up its 15th year with three winning teams going home with a total of $10,000.

The day kicked off with the first round: the elevator pitch competition. Pitches ranged from a simplified physical fitness booking app and streamlined water purifying approaches to emerging drone security system technology. Elevator pitch winners Eric Jensen, Matt Larsen, Zain Hanif and Ellen Schott took home $500 after impressing the judge and company representative audience with their interest-sparking and comical pitch for InfinitySoft, a scalable data analytics platform provider for the oil and gas industry.

This year’s MBA Venture Challenge contained 68 first-year MBA students tasked with assisting applicant companies with business advice and financial/competitive analysis on current and future market and growth strategies. Each year the MBA Venture Challenge creates high-stakes competition between teams, for both sponsored cash awards and significant bragging rights. Additionally, the competition provides networking opportunities as well as high-value insights for participating firms.

The Venture Challenge asks the MBA student teams to provide a clear, unbiased and business-oriented evaluation of their selected firm’s market and financial viability. The start-up firms are invited to apply from throughout the Aggie Entrepreneurship Ecosystem, and the MBA teams selected their favorite firm, based solely on a short summary provided by the applicants. The program operates through partnerships and sponsorship from the Aggie Angel Network, JB Knowledge and the Texas A&M University Division of Research. The original 26 business applicants came from a wide variety of industries, including human tissue engineering and ecommerce, adventure media and consumer products.

While the MBA teams were allotted only two weeks of direct contact with their assigned company representatives, they were provided feedback and direction from industry and university mentors, including the MBA program faculty and volunteer entrepreneurs. Full-Time MBA Program Director Shannon Deer explains “the MBA Venture Challenge encourages our students to integrate what they have learned across the business disciplines” and allows each team to “demonstrate the ability to navigate ambiguity and intellectual curiosity – two critical skills our employers seek in our students.”

The MBA Venture Challenge consisted of a full-day competition over three rounds of judging by an audience of experienced judges from CNVE’s network of business, academic and entrepreneurial community leaders. Each round required the teams to present a concise yet in-depth analysis of the start-up and provide meaningful recommendations for future company success.

“Now in its 15th year, the MBA Venture Challenge has clearly set the standard for high-intensity and high-impact interaction between student teams and startup ventures,” said Blake Petty, director of the CNVE. “The analysis provided by these outstanding MBAs has proven to be immediately invaluable to the participating companies, and there is simply no better way to expose our students to the real-life challenges of entrepreneurship than to immerse them into a startup…even if only for two weeks.”

For those companies or judges interested in participating in the 2018 MBA Venture Challenge, be on the lookout for application information to begin circulating in November 2017.

The winning MBA teams were announced Feb. 17 at a networking and awards reception immediately after the Venture Challenge:

$5,000 – First Place (sponsored by the Texas A&M Division of Research) – Brent Carter, Nick Cheng, Philip Spencer, Jana Soares; CelaCare

$3,000 – Second Place (sponsored by the Aggie Angel Network) – Mario Coll, Thomas Dowlearn, Eclair Lehmongkol, Ankur Soni; IntuiTap Medical

$2,000 – Third Place (sponsored by JBKnowledge) – Meagan Altman, James Cochran, Lia Rojas Unamo, Rahul Sharma; FireDisc

Learn more about the results of previous MBA Venture Challenge competitions.

 

Categories: Centers, Entrepreneurship, Mays Business, MBA, News, Staff, Students, Texas A&M

The Texas A&M University Institute for Advanced Studies (TIAS), Mays Business School and the Department of Marketing are hosting a reception on Feb. 23 to welcome TIAS Faculty Fellow V. Kumar (VK).

During the reception, VK will share comments about the directions in which his work is heading. In addition to marketing, his research connects to a variety of scholarly fields, including information systems, computer science, finance, accounting and health care.

The reception will be 3-5 p.m. in Cocanougher Center (Wehner 183), with formal comments by VK at 3:30 p.m. Pay parking is available in Lot 72 off Olsen Boulevard (UB accepted).

VK is the Regents Professor; Richard and Susan Lenny Distinguished Chair Professor of Marketing; executive director of the Center for Excellence in Brand & Customer Management; and Ph.D. program director at the J. Mack Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University. He also is the Chang Jiang Scholar at Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China. He has been recognized with 14 lifetime achievement awards in several areas of marketing from the American Marketing Association (AMA) and other professional organizations.

He has been honored in multiple countries with prestigious awards and fellowships, including the Chang Jiang Scholar, HUST, China; Lee Kong Chian Fellow, Singapore Management University, Singapore; Indian School of Business Senior Fellow, India. He spends his “free” time visiting business leaders to identify challenging problems to solve. VK has worked with several Global Fortune 1000 firms to maximize their profits and publish studies with rigor and relevance.

He has published more than 250 articles and 25 books (translated in multiple languages), and has received more than 25 research and teaching excellence awards. He is the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Marketing and in 2017, was recognized as a Fellow of AMA. In 2017, he has been chosen as a “Legend in Marketing,” where his work is published in a 10-volume encyclopedia with commentaries from scholars worldwide.

There are 10 scholars in the 2016-17 class of Faculty Fellows. TIAS was established in December 2010 by The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents to build on the growing academic reputation of Texas A&M and to provide a framework to attract top scholars from throughout the nation and abroad for appointments of up to a year. The selection of Faculty Fellows initiates with faculty nominations of National Academies and Nobel Prize-caliber scholars who align with existing strengths and ambitions of the University. To learn more, visit http://tias.tamu.edu.

Categories: Marketing, Mays Business, Texas A&M

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School has named three of its most distinguished former students as 2017 Outstanding Alumni. The honorees are Gregory M. Cokinos ’79, Cydney Collier Donnell ’81 and Carri Baker ’84. They will be honored at the 25th-Year Outstanding Alumni Awards Dinner on April 6.

Mays Business School honors graduates who have led lives of distinction and who embody the Aggie core values – loyalty, integrity, excellence, leadership, selfless service and respect – with the Mays Outstanding Alumni Award. Recipients come from all industries, have been active in their communities and continue to serve their alma mater. The recipients learned of their honor when surprised in their places of business and other locations by a group of Mays Business School representatives, including Dean Eli Jones.

“Mays Business School’s 2017 Outstanding Alumni are great examples of Mays Transformational Leaders: Responsible, ethical leaders with entrepreneurial mindsets and vision, who have strong business competencies and personify selfless service,” Jones said. “Here at Mays, we have no shortage of leaders who have excelled beyond their college careers and who help advance the world’s prosperity. We are pleased to recognize and celebrate them at our annual awards dinner.”

To date, the school has honored 79 former students who have made outstanding contributions in their chosen fields with significant impact, innovation and influence at the school, in their community and beyond.

Gregory M. Cokinos ’79 is co-founder of Houston-based Cokinos, Bosien & Young, the largest law firm in Texas focusing on construction and engineering law. He has been named as one of The Top 100 Super Lawyers in the State of Texas by Texas Monthly every year since 2007. He was instrumental in the creation of the Construction Law Journal and has been the Journal’s editor since its inception. He is also an arbitrator for the American Arbitration Association. He is a graduate of the Department of Management.

Cydney Collier Donnell ’81 is the Julio S. LaGuarta Professor in Real Estate, executive professor and associate department head of finance at Mays where she teaches graduate level classes in real estate capital markets. She is also the present Director of Real Estate Programs overseeing the Master of Real Estate Program and undergraduate real estate finance classes. Prior to this, she was the Managing Director for European Investors, Inc. in New York City, where she managed more than $3 billion in real estate securities on behalf of U.S. pension funds, foundations, endowments and high-net-worth clients. She is a graduate of the Department of Finance.

Carri Baker ’84 has served for 32 years as a key executive and chief operations officer for San Antonio-based Linebarger Goggan Blair & Sampson, a nationally recognized law firm representing governments and school districts throughout the U.S. Her civic leadership has made a significant impact in the education, health and economic development of San Antonio. She currently serves on the Dean’s Advisory Board for Mays, and the Chancellor’s Century Council and the President’s Advisory Board for Texas A&M San Antonio. She is a graduate of the Department of Marketing.

Categories: Alumni, Dean Eli Jones, Finance, Management, Marketing, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M

The 2017 Women in IT Conference on March 3 will provide an opportunity to network and learn from colleagues and professionals and hear from leaders at Kendra Scott, Salesforce and Intel Security.witspeakers

The conference is hosted by the Center for the Management of Information Systems at Mays Business School. Speakers and topics
include the path to leadership, trends in technology, career management, cybersecurity and more. Three roundtable sessions will focus on increasing your network and meeting other dynamic women.

Featured speakers include Brandie Claborn, vice president of Global Corporate Communications at Intel Security; Stephanie Kinser, senior vice president of Enterprise Solution Engineering for Salesforce; and Christine Rose, CIO and head of eCommerce for Kendra Scott.

The conference will be 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Texas A&M University’s Ballroom 2400 in the Memorial Student Center. It is open to Texas A&M students, faculty, staff and the general public.

Register here.

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Categories: Mays Business, News, Texas A&M

In a rapidly globalizing environment and ever-changing world, business schools are providing more value than ever. Today at its 2017 Deans Conference, AACSB International (AACSB) — the world’s largest global education network — unveiled 35 innovations that represent critical work being done by business schools to better their communities and society at large.

Mays Business School was recognized for its submission on the Texas A&M University Petroleum Ventures Program (PVP), which detailed a bold new entrepreneurial training program that better prepares students to be leaders in the oil and gas industry. By connecting the curriculum with industry needs, PVP gives students a competitive advantage in an interdisciplinary way.

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The second annual “Innovations That Inspire” initiative showcases unique ways business schools are changing the status quo to address societal needs, while empowering the business leaders of tomorrow.

The AACSB’s second annual “Innovations That Inspire” initiative recognizes institutions that have championed change in the business education landscape. A total of 315 submissions were received across 33 countries, mirroring society’s growing global demands, as well as the critical need for strong, connected and forward-thinking business schools. The initiative—and the impressive work it showcases—underscores the important role that innovation plays in achieving the industry-wide vision for business education, which AACSB unveiled in 2016.

“With great pleasure, I am thrilled to recognize Mays Business School for its role in driving innovation in business education and fostering positive change in the areas of diversity and global economic prosperity,” said Tom R. Robinson, president and chief executive officer of AACSB international. “Through meaningful ideas and increasing opportunities for engagement, Mays Business School has created a remarkable impact, to ensure a better and more connected world for many years to come.”

Eli Jones, dean of Mays Business School, said the Texas A&M Petroleum Ventures Program “an example of connecting innovation with our school’s vision to advance the world’s prosperity.” He added, “We are honored to receive this recognition for stepping up to serve our state and nation in this important area.” As part of the school’s new strategic plan, Mays aims to build the school’s research presence in the Mays Grand Challenge area of Energy.

The academic collaboration between Mays Business School and the College of Engineering fosters teamwork among petroleum engineering students and students in the Department of Finance at Mays. The first classes for the PVP Certificate Program were offered in Fall 2016. PVP is funded by a $12 million gift by Anthony Bahr ’91 and Jay Graham ’92, business partners in Houston-based WildHorse Resources Management Company in Houston.

About AACSB International

As the world’s largest business education network connecting academe with business, AACSB provides business education intelligence, quality assurance, and professional development services to more than 1,500 member organizations across 97 countries and territories. Founded in 1916, AACSB accredits 780 business schools worldwide. Its global headquarters is located in Tampa, Florida, USA; Asia Pacific headquarters is located in Singapore; and its EMEA headquarters is located in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. For more information, visit www.aacsb.edu.

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 6,200 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, business, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The vision of Mays Business School is to advance the world’s prosperity.

 

 

 

Categories: Centers, Dean Eli Jones, Departments, Energy, Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Programs, Research, Texas A&M

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Escalators may be quick, convenient and even fun, but according to Rory Vaden, author of Take the Stairs, they aren’t the fastest route to getting ahead. The New York Times best-selling author recently spoke to students at Mays Business School about the virtues of taking the stairs in an “escalator world.”

“We live in a society of shortcuts and procrastination,” Vaden told a packed Ray Auditorium on Wednesday, the second group of Mays marketing students of the day. “When faced with the decision to ride an escalator (the easy route) or take the stairs (the hard route), most people choose the path of least resistance.”

Vaden’s appearance was a team effort. Ron Lamb, president of Reynolds & Reynolds the first founding partner of the Professional Selling Initiative (PSI) at Mays had introduced PSI Director and Marketing Clinical Professor Janet Parish to Vaden’s works. “After reading the books, I was so moved that I led a special topics course with 13 students to study the books,” Parish said.

She told Lamb she was doing this, and he in turn told Vaden. After a chain of events and contacts, Parish invited Vaden to campus. Once he accepted, Parish asked fellow instructor Sandi Lampo to provide the audience her large marketing classes to create to biggest impact for M
ays.

Vaden is co-founder of Southwestern Consulting, a multimillion-dollar global sales consulting practice. He said part of his job is to study what makes other people successful. Throughout his career he has encountered countless successful people, from entrepreneurs to athletes to founders of large churches, and discovered the common denominator of their success. Surprisingly, he said, it had nothing to do with age, personal background or education. “The real secret is self-discipline,” Vaden said. “Successful people are those who have formed habits of doing things they know they should do even when they don’t feel like doing them.”

He recalled when he was age 10 and he complained to his mother about not enjoying martial arts and wanting to quit. His mother quipped: “Enjoying it isn’t a requirement of doing it.” From then on, he learned the value of following through with anything painful, uncomfortable or even boring. “It’s not just about making your life
as hard as possible,” Vaden said. “Difficult short-term choices lead to easy long-term consequences.”

Vaden said he believes success is never a one-and-done deal. It comes at a daily price. He summed it up with what he calls the “Rent Axiom:” “Success is never owned. It is only rented and the rent is due every day.”

Categories: Marketing, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M

Mays Business School’s Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance program was ranked fourth in College Choice‘s 2016 ranking of Best Bachelor’s in Finance Degree Programs. The ranking was based on cost of attendance and salary upon graduation.

Data was gathered from individual school websites, other rankings sites, and the U.S. News and World Report site.

Categories: Finance, Mays Business, News, Programs, Rankings, Texas A&M

Senior Mariah Smiley’s nonprofit is more than an extracurricular; it’s a labor of love.

576413_529112773768880_1364884412_nHer organization, called Drops of Love, raises awareness of the scarcity of clean water throughout the world and has sponsored the construction of clean water wells in four villages in El Salvador, Nicaragua and India. Donors are encouraged to give with a guarantee: one dollar provides clean water to one person for one whole year.

“We believe that every single person in this world should have access to clean water. Period,” said Smiley, a management information systems major who serves as president of the organization. “Every single person involved is here because they love the people we’re able to help. 100% of our donations go towards drilling the wells. We pay expenses out of pocket so that every cent can go to help these people that so desperately need something we take for granted in the United States.”

Each well costs $5,000 on average. Builders are sponsored to construct the wells between $1,200 and $2,000, depending on the region and time of year. The wells typically last for years, usually servicing 250-500 people, but one village had as few as eight families.

But when it comes to impact, Smiley believes the size of the village isn’t important. “Bigger organizations often overlook the smaller villages so that they can ‘do more good elsewhere.’ This is true but then who does good in the smaller, less populated villages?”

Her eyes were opened to the water scarcity crisis during a poignant conversation she had with her parents when she was 14. They had returned from a charity fundraiser and explained to Smiley how people frequently died from diseases they contracted through unsafe drinking water. She learned that the good news was that disease was preventable and it didn’t cost much to help – even one dollar could provide one person clean water for an entire year. Smiley recalled thinking: “If I could find a dollar as a 14-year-old, I knew others could too.”4160130_orig

She decided to do her part by forming Drops of Love. Then, at 17, she and her brother registered Drops of Love as an official non-profit and she took the helm as president.

Four years later, Smiley envisions a network of Water Ambassadors associated with Drops of Love who can sponsor their own wells by hosting fundraisers in their own communities. “We see Drops of Love as a vehicle for others who want to help but don’t know how to get started,” she said.

She hopes others can see just how much they are capable of creating an impact. “Everyone has a sphere of influence that they can inspire to change the world. With Drops of Love, we want to provide these leaders with the tools to get out there and make a difference.”

Categories: Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

Ten Mays Business School students were given the MBA Scholar Award Dec. 1 – a new award designed to honor 4.0 graduates from the MBA programs. The celebration at CityCentre Houston was attended by Mays Dean Eli Jones, Associate Dean for Graduate Programs Arvind Mahajan and Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs Michael Kinney celebrated with the Executive MBA and Professional MBA Program Class of 2016 graduates.

Scholars enrolled in the Executive MBA Program were Rajee Hari and Santiago Velasquez. Scholars in the Professional MBA Program were Kenza Bouzaher, Brad Burgess, Lane Cooper, John Doolin, Shelly Fuhrman, Ashley Gibson, Tyler Stegeman and Paul Urane.

The idea for the award came from Bala Shetty, who previously was Interim Associate Dean for Graduate Programs.

MBA Scholar Award winner Brad Burgess said afterward, “The program has done so much for me and opened up many new opportunities. I look forward to helping this program grow and prosper in the future.”

To view photos of the Class of 2016 Scholars Awards Dinner visit https://www.flickr.com/photos/maysbusinessschool/sets/72157677407413586/

Categories: Alumni, Dean Eli Jones, Featured Stories, Mays Business, MBA, News, Programs, Students, Texas A&M

len-berrycroppedLeonard Berry, a marketing professor at Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School, has stepped up his research of cancer care to encompass those closest to the cancer patients – the caregivers. Most often, the caregivers are family members, and are not professionals at caring for patients.

His paper, “Supporting the Supporters: What Family Caregivers Need to Care for a Loved One With Cancer,” is online and will be in the January print issue of Journal of Oncology Practice. The journal is one of the two journals published by the American Society of Clinical Oncology. It is widely read in the oncology community.

“It is an article that I am especially proud of because it addresses a real need to better prepare and support the family caregivers of cancer patients in their caregiving roles,” Berry said. “This is a group that is often overlooked, even though the caregiver is an extension of the medical team.”

Berry’s co-authors are Shraddha Mahesh Dalwadi, who earned her MBA from Mays and is a fourth-year medical student at Texas A&M; and Dr. Joseph O. Jacobson of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School.

The researchers propose a four-part framework for supporting family caregivers:

– Assess caregivers’ needs using formal measures, just as the cancer patient’s own needs are assessed;

– Educate caregivers for their caregiving roles, most notably, with training in the low-level medical support that cancer patients require at home;

– Empower caregivers to become full-fledged members of the patient’s cancer team, all working toward common goals;

– Assist caregivers proactively in their duties, so that they retain a sense of control and self-efficacy rather than having to react to imminent medical crises without sufficient resources at their disposal.

An estimated 4.6 million people in the United States care for someone with cancer at home. Too often, these caregivers—spouses, other family members, or friends—are poorly prepared for this vital but demanding role that takes a toll on them and, by extension, the patient. Only one-third of all caregivers report being asked by a health-care provider what they need to care for the patient; even fewer are asked what they need to care for themselves. That lack of preparation can worsen the anxiety that caregivers already feel about a loved one’s health.

An at-home caregiver typically provides the patient with cancer with at least four types of assistance: daily living activities, medical care, social support and advocacy.

The psychological burden may be even greater for family caregivers than for the patient, especially as the disease advances, and greater for female than for male caregivers. Stress is particularly heavy if caregivers feel ill-prepared: a sense of low self-efficacy heightens the perceived burden, so it is important to develop self-confidence for the caregiving role.

Berry is University Distinguished Professor of Marketing, Regents Professor, and holds the M.B. Zale Chair in Retailing and Marketing Leadership in the Mays Business School at Texas A&M University. He also is a Presidential Professor for Teaching Excellence.

His research has focused on service, particularly in health care, and in recent years more specifically on cancer care.

“I became interested in studying service improvement in cancer care because we are making more progress on clinical care than service care, and when cancer strikes, patients and their families need both,” Berry said. “I am able to leverage my career background as a services researcher and the past 15 years intensively studying healthcare to contribute to our thinking about trying to ease the path for cancer patients and their families.”

As a visiting scientist at Mayo Clinic in 2001-2002, he conducted an in-depth research study of healthcare service, the basis for his book, Management Lessons from Mayo Clinic (2008).  He also has conducted and published field research at Gundersen Health, ThedaCare and Bellin Health, three high-performance health systems in Wisconsin. Concurrent with his faculty position in Mays Business School, Berry is a senior fellow of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement studying service improvement in cancer care for patients and their families.

Berry has written 10 books in all, including Discovering the Soul of Service; On Great Service; Marketing Services: Competing Through Quality; and Delivering Quality Service. He is the author of numerous academic articles and an invited lecturer throughout the world.

 

Categories: Faculty, Featured Stories, Health Care, Marketing, Mays Business, News, Research, Texas A&M