Awards

2020 Competition Overview

Over 700 master’s level students representing over 70 major universities in the U.S. registered for the national competition to compete for $70,000 in total prizes. The fourth annual competition was held virtually and was open to all accredited educational institutions based in the United States. Full-time and part-time master’s students from accredited Master of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Information Systems, Master of Public Health, Master of Business Administration programs, or other similar master’s programs in business, healthcare, or analytics, were eligible to enter.

Alexander Kondziolka and Jonathon Thierer from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania received the top prize following a virtual presentation on Thursday, Nov. 12 to an executive panel of judges. The Second-Place prize of $20,000 was awarded to Christopher Painton, Yilun Sun, and Ruiwen Wang from the University of Southern California (USC) Marshall School of Business, while the Third-Place prize of $10,000 was presented to Kamala Pillai, Jack Sampiere, and Chloe Xu from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Anderson School of Management.

2019 Competition Overview

Over 1,300 masters level students representing over 80 major universities in the U.S. registered for the national competition to compete for $52,500 in total prizes. The case competition focused on chronic pain and the treatment of this condition through long-term opioid therapy, which has increased dramatically over the past two decades. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as many as 1 in 4 patients receiving long-term opioid therapy in a primary care setting will struggle with opioid disorder. Using de-identified data, the students were asked to predict long-term opioid therapy post initial treatment. The goal is to identify patients at risk for continued long-term use of opioid therapies allowing for early intervention.

The first-place team from the University of California, Los Angeles received a $30,000 prize. Students on this team were Leah Kelly, Ozgur Cetinok, and Erica Millwater.

The second-place team from Northwestern University received a $15,000 prize. Students on this team were Tanya Tandon and Saurubh Annadante.

The third-place team from New York University received a $7,500 prize. Students on this team were Shuyu Wang, Hong Gao, and Jie Yang.

Please view finalist submissions from 2019 to set a benchmark for the required competition component.

2018 Competition Overview

More than 300 masters-level students representing 109 teams from 19 major universities in the U.S. registered for the competition, which showcased students’ analytical abilities to solve a real-world business problem. The students were asked to predict the likelihood of a patient experiencing a heart attack within the next 3 months. Students had to evaluate more than 400 variables, including age and gender of the patient, geography, and other medical conditions.

The first-place team from the University of Southern California received a $20,000 prize. Students on this team were Lianne Ho, Edward Cho, and David Sung.

The second-place team from Bentley University received a $10,000 prize. Students on this team were Melody Sumiya, Qi Xu, and Hanyin Nifrom.

The third-place team from the University of California, Los Angeles received a $5,000 prize. Students on this team were Kyle Cross, Ming Hsin-Li, and Efrat Mordechay.

2017 Competition Overview

The analytics case received by the students was designed to be ambiguous, similar to a real-world business problem. The students were asked to predict the likelihood of a newly-diagnosed Type II diabetes patient with a Medicare Advantage health plan being admitted to an inpatient facility within a year and then the likelihood of re-admission within a year. Students had to evaluate more than 900 variables, including age of the patient, gender, geography, type of health plan, and patient medication adherence.

The first-place team from Purdue University received a $6,000 prize. Students on this team were Hongxia Shi, Shenyang Yang, and Xiangyi Che.

The second-place team from the University of Southern California received a $3,000 prize. Students on this team were Martin Shapiro, Lianne Ho, and David Sung.

The third-place team from the University of California, Berkeley received a $1,500 prize. Students on this team were Yvonne Yu, David Proudman, and Christina Murphy.