October, 2013 | Mays Impacts

Dr. Aleda V. Roth
Dr. Aleda V. Roth

Clemson University’s Aleda V. Roth studies the global supply chain’s impact on public health, community, environment and economic security. For several months, she is conducting that research at Texas A&M University as a Texas Institute for Advanced Study (TIAS) Eminent Scholar.

While at Texas A&M, she is a visiting professor at Mays Business School, working with the Department of Information & Operations Management. She is collaborating with Greg Heim and Michael Ketzenberg, Mays associate professors of information and operations management, and will explore relationships with Texas A&M’s scholarly programs in agriculture and life sciences. She will also collaborate with Rich Metters, Tenneco professor and department head of information and operations management at Mays, and with other faculty and students at Mays.

Roth shared her story as part of her TIAS Distinguished Department Lecture at Mays, “Broken Chains: Insights from Food Supply Chains and Ecology.”

“Before 2006 I was an ordinary supply chain person. Then I became interested in the broader issues of the lack of transparency in global supply chains when my dog, Lady,  became sick,” she recalls. “Lady had elevated kidney enzymes due to tainted dog food. At that time, hundreds of brands and generic pet food were being recalled due to one small adulterated ingredient—wheat gluten–that came from China. That led me to think about reframing the way we think about risks in food supply chains overall. We are masters of supply chain innovation, but we don’t always know what we don’t know.”

Roth hopes to reduce the operational risks in FDA-regulated supply chains, particularly those associated with foods and pharmaceuticals. She is especially concerned about food and ingredients imported from China and other emerging markets. Almost 13 percent of foods Americans consume comes  from China, including about 70 percent of apple juice, 43 percent of mushrooms, and 78% of tilapia; and about 80 percent of active ingredients in pharmaceuticals emanate from overseas, especially from China and India. U.S. regulatory bodies have limited capacity to police imported product flows. Less than 3% of imported food is inspected by the FDA; and for China, about only about 1.3 percent of the drugs makers are subjected to inspections a year. In emerging market countries, it is well-known that food safety problems often arise because of  noncompliance with laws and standards, and these problems are exacerbated by corruption and counterfeiting. Roth is focusing on an even more egregious problem in emerging markets. Namely, the high levels pollution and toxic chemicals that entering the air, water, and soil are being taken up by plants and animals; and thereby, an unknown level of toxins and heavy metals are entering the food supply chains.

Roth describes a new triple bottom line for long supply chains: Sustainability, corporate responsibility and quality of life hold keys to the solution. She asks, “Is the pursuit of inexpensive food really tipping the scales in terms of ecological health, and in turn, in creating an adverse impact on people’s well-being and health care costs.

She cited some examples that bolster her case:

  • The cancer incidence in China is rising at alarming rates, in part, due to pollution.
  • About 40 percent of the rice samples from Hunan region were positive for cadmium, a known carcinogen that damages kidneys and lungs
  • The discovery in early 2013 of more than 16,000 pigs floating in rivers in China, which threatened Shanghai’s drinking water supply

“Americans are not immune. Lead levels in rice imported from China and other Asian countries are up as much as 60 times the level recommended safe for children. Yet, consumers are remain blindside to what they are consuming.”  Roth says. “There is no requirement for labeling the country of origin for ingredients or processed foods. A loaf of bread can contain wheat from nine different countries, and no labeling is required. Transparency in country of origin—for all food ingredients– will give consumers the information they need to make informed choices about the food they purchase.”

As the Burlington Industries Distinguished Professor at Clemson University, Roth’s research seeks theoretical and practical explanations of how firms can best deploy their operations, global supply chains and technology strategies for competitive advantage. With more than 200 publications, Roth’s work ranks in the top 1 percent of production and operations management scholars in the U.S. and ranks 7th worldwide in service management research.

She describes herself as “kind of a Renaissance woman” due to her broad education, with degrees in management, biostatistics and supply chain management.

Roth concluded her TIAS presentation by showing a picture of Lady — her fully recovered dog. “As you can see, she is fully recovered and doing fine.”

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Executive Speakers, Texas A&M

Ever since I was 3 feet tall, I was trying to sell things and turn a profit. My mother used to go to craft shows, and she would let me sit at her booth and sell little bead key chains and “rexlaces.” Hard work and all, I loved doing business, and I knew I wanted to do it for the rest of my life.

Categories: Perspectives, Students, Texas A&M

Aggie 100

Texas A&M University is churning out some of the nation’s best and brightest business leaders. On Oct. 25, Mays Business School’s Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship at Texas A&M University announced the recipients of the 9th Annual Aggie 100, honoring the fastest growing Aggie-owned or Aggie-led businesses in the world.

From the nation’s leading energy firms based in Houston to digital empires like Roku out of Satatoga, Calif., Texas A&M’s Aggies are transforming the way we do business and impacting Americans day-to-day. Honoree JBKnowledge recently released a new Augmented Reality App for the commercial construction industry that garnered international interest for its unprecedented visualization of build projects. Leftfield Pictures, based in New York, N.Y., has been a major unscripted player since 2009 when it launched the History Channel breakout “Pawn Stars,” which brought record ratings and several spinoffs. The stories of entrepreneurial spirit and success continue with each of these Aggie 100 honorees who live it every day.

“Our Aggie 100 honorees demonstrate that the character and traditions developed at our great university continue to play a significant role in their success across industries and generations,” said Richard H. Lester, Executive Director of the Mays Business School’s Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship. “Aggie leaders have proven time and time again that no matter the situation, solid business ideas, strong character, tenacity, and hard work pay off.”

For the full list of recipients, go to cnve.tamu.edu.

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Centers, Featured Stories, Texas A&M

The Executive MBA Program (EMBA) at Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School maintained its rank among the top 10 U.S.-based programs at public universities. According to rankings released Monday by Financial Times, the Texas A&M EMBA Program ranked 8th.

The program stands 18th among both private and public U.S.-based schools and 65th in the world. The overall ranking considers the top 100 EMBA programs in the world.

A larger number of schools based in other countries made the top 100 ranking this year, reflecting the globalization of the business school market. “The Texas A&M Executive MBA Program has struck a good balance of U.S. and international students to create a diverse EMBA class,” says Julie Orzabal, director of the EMBA Program.  Students entering the EMBA Program in 2012 represented 12 countries outside the U.S. “These students bring unique perspectives and experiences to our EMBA classes, ultimately enriching the quality of our classroom discussions and peer-to-peer interaction.”

To determine its rankings, London-based Financial Times surveyed thousands of EMBA alumni from more than 100 of the top programs in the world.

The Texas A&M EMBA performed particularly well in several of the rankings’ key measures:

  • Years of work experience: Texas A&M ranked 1st among U.S. public universities, 2nd in U.S. overall and 15th in the world. The program consistently averages 15 to 17 years of work experience in its classes.
  • Aims achieved: Texas A&M ranked 2nd among U.S. public universities, 3rd in U.S. overall and 19th in the world—evidence that the Texas A&M EMBA is helping graduates achieve their goals for pursuing the degree.
  • Research: Mays Business School faculty ranked 10th among all U.S. public schools and moved up 10 spots to 32nd in the world. This ranking is based on the number of scholarly publications by full-time faculty between January 2010 and August 2013.

Mary Lea McAnally, associate dean for graduate programs at Mays Business School, says the success of the program should be credited to its faculty, staff and students. “Our continued success in the rankings reflects the dedication of our faculty and staff in providing a world-class program for our students. This dedication leads to the success and satisfaction of our students, but more important, to the value they create. Our EMBAs are leaders in their organizations and their communities.”

As the Texas A&M Executive MBA Program enters its 15th year, it continues to target professionals with at least 10 years of experience. The program’s new home in CityCentre, a mixed-use urban development in Houston, has further enhanced the value it delivers to students by providing a permanent facility for Mays Business School and an educational environment designed for the executive audience.

For more information about the Executive MBA Program at Mays Business School, visit emba.tamu.edu.

Categories: Texas A&M

Brian Carpenter
Brian Carpenter

Brian Carpenter is one of 21 MBA students across the state to be selected as an inductee of the Texas Business Hall of Fame (TBHF), which carries a $10,000 scholarship award. The TBHF recognizes students who define entrepreneurial ventures with impact to future business in Texas.

Carpenter, a student in the Biomedical Engineering program, completed his Master of Biomedical Engineering and MBA simultaneously, earning a 4.0 in each. He continues to work with medical devices through his efforts at a cardiovascular pathology laboratory and has founded a consulting firm, CustomHeard, with one of his former classmates. His business venture enhances the customer experience for service organizations by helping them listen and respond to customer needs. He and his business partner credit Mays Marketing Professor Leonard Berry’s Services Marketing class for instilling in them the value of improving profit by improving customer service.

“It is apparent to me that the medical device industry recognizes the value of the MBA degree,” Carpenter stated. Responses from clients confirm the value he sought in applying to the Mays MBA Program. “I came here [to Mays] to join the technical knowledge gained in Biomedical Engineering with the skills and language needed to commercialize and monetize ideas.”

Carpenter will join the other 2013 recipients at the Annual Scholarship Luncheon in San Antonio in November.

Patti Urbina, Director of the Full-Time MBA Program at Mays, remarked, “Brian’s academic and entrepreneurial success make him a worthy recipient of the scholarship; his marketing research company, CustomHeard, LLC, is forward-thinking in its focus on improved customer experiences.

Associate Dean for Graduate Studies Mary Lea McAnally added, “recognition of our students’ strength in promoting growth in the Texas economy is a hallmark of the Mays MBA.”

Carpenter likes life in College Station; when he is not developing business ideas, he, his wife and their two dogs enjoy relaxing and hanging out around town.

The Texas Business Hall of Fame Foundation is a non-profit organization of 70 directors who are business leaders from cities throughout the state. The organization’s mission is to recognize the accomplishments and contributions of Texas business leaders, to perpetuate and inspire the values of entrepreneurial spirit, personal integrity and community leadership in all generations of Texans.

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Students, Texas A&M

Becky and Monty Davis
Becky and Monty Davis

A desire to assist Mays Business School students prompted two Texas A&M University alumni to donate $250,000 to establish the Becky ’76 and Monty Davis ’77 Endowed Business Honors Scholarship Program. This program will support two students during their four-year studies in Mays’ Business Honors program.

Monty and Becky were the lead donors for the “Davis Center for Football Player Development” near Kyle Field.

Monty Davis, who received an accounting degree at Texas A&M, has spoken with Mays Business Honors students numerous times, and has been impressed with their questions and feedback. He says his accounting degree provided him with a solid start. “It gave me a good foundation for my career, and the things I learned at Texas A&M have served me well since,” he says. “I want to help young people have this opportunity to learn now, so that it helps them in the future.”

“We are so very appreciative of Becky and Monty’s generosity,” said Mays Dean Jerry Strawser. “The Davis Scholarship Program will allow our School to compete for outstanding students who are considering the very best universities across the United States.”

Monty Davis is COO of Core Laboratories, an oil service company that advises oil exploration and production companies on how to get the most oil or gas out of reservoirs. Becky majored in elementary education at Texas A&M. After raising their two daughters, she devotes most of her time to church and ranch activities.

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Donors Corner, Texas A&M

3 Day Startup (3DS)
3 Day Startup (3DS)

Students from across the Texas A&M campus will have the opportunity to see if they have what it takes to form their own tech-based company. The catch: they only have three days.

3 Day Startup (3DS) is an accelerated hands-on program for passionate students with an entrepreneurial drive. The philosophy behind 3DS is “learning by doing.” The program recognizes that students need more than great ideas to launch a successful business. Over one weekend, 40 students will be equipped with resources, tools and real-world knowledge that will help them transform business concepts into functional and sustainable companies.

Mays Business School’s Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship (CNVE) will host 3DS Aggieland, a locally organized 3DS event founded in 2012. Applications for 3DS are due Sunday, Oct. 13. The event will take place Friday, Nov. 15 through Sunday, Nov. 17 at Startup Aggieland, located in the Texas A&M University Research Park.

On the first day of the event, students will participate in a brainstorming session to identify the best ideas for a software startup. As part of this effort, they will have the opportunity to consult with top-notch entrepreneurs, investors and professors.

Participants will also experience designing and creating business models, contacting potential customers, creating prototypes and developing both professional and personal relationships.

On the final day, students will present an investor pitch along with a minimal prototype. These final project pitches will be open to the public and will take place in the Cocanougher Center at Mays.

“There are two primary outcomes of 3DS—both of which will significantly enhance a student’s knowledge base,” says Richard Lester, clinical associate professor and executive director of the CNVE. “First, participants will learn the process of launching a new venture and the team dynamics needed to pull it off. Second, there is a distinct possibility that by Sunday night the student team will actually have a new venture that could attract venture capital or angel funding.”

For more information, visit tamu.3daystartup.org or visit 3DS Aggieland’s Facebook page at facebook.com/3DayStartupTAMU.

3 Day Startup (3DS)

3 Day Startup (3DS)

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Centers, Faculty, Programs, Staff, Students, Texas A&M

Texas A&M University President R. Bowen Loftin
Texas A&M University President R. Bowen Loftin

Business Honors students at Mays Business School learned about personal branding and building relationships from the top leader on campus, Texas A&M University President R. Bowen Loftin. He will step down in January to a faculty position after serving as president since February 2010 and interim president since June 2009.

Here are some of the students’ takeaways:

My largest takeaway from President Loftin’s presentation was his emphasis on working hard to build relationships. He said that this first begins with making a strong impression and being memorable, which is what his bow tie does. The relationship then strengthens and grows by making connections. Dr. Loftin places a huge amount of value on his ability to make an impression and make connections, and he believes that this ability has led to his success in all aspects of his career.

-DJ Tharp ’16, Business Honors Major

When I attended Dr. Loftin’s lecture, I learned several important things. First of all, Dr. Loftin truly created his own personal brand with his signature bowtie. When he meets people for the first time, the connection they draw with his bowtie and his first name “Bowen” subconsciously forms and creates recognition. I enjoyed the lecture very much, and it allowed me to appreciate what a great speaker Dr. Loftin is.

-Samir Syed ’17, Business Honors Major

President Loftin does not fit the stereotypical mold of an administrator, or even a professor. Dr. Loftin genuinely cares about each individual. While he was speaking, I forgot that he was the president of one of the largest universities in the nation because I felt like he cared about me as a person and not just as a student.

-Sarah Burns ’16, Business Honors Major

I learned from President Loftin that I need to find something about myself that will be memorable and unique to other people.  I need to discover my “personal brand,” similar to President Loftin’s bow ties.  First impressions are obviously very important to building relationships, so we should want to create a good one for ourselves. President Loftin also inspired me to try to relate to as many people as I can, no matter how different they are from me.

-Allison Sanders ’17, Business Honors Major

Listening to President Loftin was a very enlightening. He taught us that finding something that distinguishes yourself in the professional world is a key strategy to your success. He always stressed working your hardest to find a personal connection with people.

-Haley Hoekstra ’14, Finance Major

My main takeaway from hearing Dr. Loftin speak about what his bow tie means to him was that I can find my own “thing” to do — and it doesn’t have to be clothing related. I love talking to people, and he made it clear that conversing is an important skill anywhere you go in the business world — or anywhere for that matter. If I am always polite when talking to people and can successfully converse with strangers, that can be my own personal branding “thing.” Dr. Loftin assured me that I have what it takes to succeed in the world — a smile, and Aggie ring (when I get mine!), and the ability to converse.

-Caitlin Falke ’17, Business Honors Major

I recently attended the presentation “What my Bowtie Means” by Dr. Bowen Loftin and was introduced to the concept of personal branding. I had never thought of myself as a brand, but this talk gave me a perspective as to why it is important to sell yourself. Loftin discussed how his bowtie made him memorable and created a connection to his name, and that is something I want to emulate. One of the most valuable pieces of advice he gave was to always listen and try to connect with people you meet for the first time — there is something that you have been through that is meaningful to the other person, regardless of position.

-Luke Williamson ’15, Business Honors Major

Hearing Dr. Loftin speak has been on my college bucket list for some time now. I am amazed not just by how well he’s been able to brand himself with his bow tie, but also by how well he is able to connect with people. It also astonished me just how much time he puts into his job. He really lives and breathes Texas A&M and is a true leader.

-Chris Clayton ’14, Business Honors and Accounting Major

I never thought about personal branding much, but Dr. Loftin’s speech was very eye opening in his explanation of its importance. It helps people remember you, which is a key advantage in the bustling business world. When your job is to interact with others on a daily basis, branding is a useful tool to make yourself stand out.

-Audrey Haynes ’17, Business Honors Major

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Students, Texas A&M

David Perryman, Director of Communications
David Perryman

Mays Business School added directors this week: David Perryman as the Communications Director and Patti Urbina as the new Full-Time MBA Director.

Perryman received his bachelors’ degree in English at Wesleyan University in 1987 and his master’s in English at Southern Methodist University in May 1994. He has held marketing and communications positions at top companies and educational institutions, including SMU Cox School of Business, UT Health Science Center, San Antonio, Harland Clark, USAA and EDS.

Most recently, Perryman was Senior Director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving and Co-Director of Residency Communications Skills at UT Health Science Center. He was responsible for overseeing all communications, programs, fund-raising and events for the university’s Alumni Association and for teaching the Residency Communications Skills elective for fourth-year medical students.

Perryman brings a variety of marketing skills with him to Mays, including writing, editing, communication plan development, public relations, advertising, branding and event management. He has published articles in Newsweek, Dallas Business Journal and DallasCEO as well as a history book, Big B in Big D: A History of Business in Dallas County (Dallas Historical Society, 2009).

“As a native Texan who has worked in the University of Texas System and at the SMU Cox School of Business, I have great respect for Texas A&M and the Mays Business School,” he explains. “The Mays brand has always stood for smart, hard-working students who are highly sought after by employers, faculty who combine great teaching with internationally renowned scholarship, and an unmatched alumni network of business leaders.”

Perryman says he wants to help guide and enhance the messages Mays generates.

“Through consistent, credible, and compelling marketing and communications, we will continue to strengthen the ties that connect the Mays Business School’s various constituencies; articulate our unique value proposition to prospective students, faculty, and recruiters; and bolster the Mays brand in the media and marketplace.”


Patti Urbina, Director of the Full-Time MBA Program
Patti Urbina

Urbina has been with Texas A&M for more than 20 years and has a breadth of educational and professional experience from across the campus. She holds a master’s degree from Texas A&M in History with a Management minor and is an alumnus of the undergraduate Study Abroad Program. Urbina says she is eager to be joining the Mays team.

Associate Dean For Graduate Programs Mary Lea McAnally, says she is thrilled to have Urbina on her team. “She brings a depth of experience that will greatly benefit the program,” she said. “She will be an asset from day one.”

Previously, Urbina was with the Provost’s Office coordinating the academic assessment process. Prior to that role, she served as Director of the Qatar Support Office for the Texas A&M University at Qatar campus. She served as chief liaison between the main campus and branch campus to support academic, human resources and student support activities.

Urbina brings strong leadership skills in external relations with industry and international academic partnership development. She is passionate about globalization and lifelong learning and has professional experience in 20 countries across the globe, including China, Qatar, Argentina, Mexico and France.

Above all, Urbina focuses on connecting with other people. “The most important things to me are the personal and professional relationship we build in our programs,” says Urbina. “I am most proud to have worked with students, industry professionals and faculty. I believe my experience working with and supporting all types of people has prepared me well for this new role.”

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Departments, Staff, Texas A&M

On September 11, Twitter announced (through a tweet, naturally) it is considering an initial public offering. This announcement recalled memories of Facebook’s recent IPO, along with similar questions. Is this the beginning of another tech bubble? How does the market value social media enterprises? What impact will public company status have on an entrepreneurial venture? Will the demand for shares create a frenzy that causes technical market glitches on the first day of trading? However, one additional question will be raised that Facebook did not face: How profitable is Twitter?

Categories: Deanspeak