March, 2015 | Mays Impacts

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The Big Event is an organization that encourages all Texas A&M University students to give back to their community one day a year.

At the helm of the March 28 event is Big Event Director Kevin Brooks, a business management senior. He will lead a record number of volunteers, estimated around 20,503, as well as a transition to a new location – Research Park – after Big Event outgrew its previous location in Lot 100 at Reed Arena.

Other changes this year are the acceptance of honored faculty and staff members to speak at the event. Computer Science Associate Professor Scott Schaefer’s nomination stood out above the rest. Also, Big Event organizers will be able to purchase additional tools after they reallocated funds from live bands to a DJ, which is being hosted by Red Bull.

Since its establishment in 1982 by then-vice president of the Student Government Association Joe Nussbaum, the Big Event continues to grow in size and in impact. Already the largest one-day, student-run service project in the nation, The Big Event has expanded to encompass 110 other schools across the United Statues and now to international schools in Spain, Australia, Germany, Pakistan and Italy. The ultimate vision is to establish a Big Event at every school for students to be able to give back to their surrounding communities.

The Big Event leadership team is composed of individuals who exemplify selfless service, are hard-working and practice humility in their daily lives. Those who fulfill leadership roles in the organization are temporarily elevated to celebrity status for their involvement in one of Texas A&M’s longest-standing traditions.

A new director is chosen each year through an application process, based on their service to Texas A&M. Brooks credits his strong support system and management courses at Mays Business School for helping to instill those values.

“The Big Event is about investing in people,” Brooks said. “I loved every management class I took, and I loved learning about people and what keeps them going. Through my classes and professors I have been able to see what a truly good leader is, not just a manager of a budget.”

Though the leadership is an essential element of Big Event, he stresses the importance of volunteers to the overall success of the event.

“Everyone who knows this mission is aware that you don’t always see an impact right away,” Brooks said. “The people I work with are extremely selfless, ambitious and full of joy. They are not afraid of delayed gratification and are OK with waiting for the best results.”

Brooks is a sixth-generation Texan and comes from a line of Aggies. When he is not busy with the Big Event, he is a member of the Aggie Men’s Club. He hopes to continue his culture of serving others after graduation.

“If I can see that I’m directly benefiting someone or if I am making someone’s life better in some way, shape or form, I will be satisfied,” he said.

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,600 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

 

 

 

 

Categories: Texas A&M

From the stockroom to the boardroom, Blake Nordstrom has spent nearly his entire life devoted to the success of his family’s 115-year-old, Seattle-based business.

On March 11, the first-time visitor to Aggieland presented the 2015 keynote at the M.B. Zale Visionary Merchant Lecture Series, honoring innovation and the advancement of retail in the name of the M.B. and Edna Zale Foundation and hosted by the Center for Retailing Studies (CRS).

Venkatesh Shankar, the CRS’ research director, led a question-and-answer session in which Nordstrom detailed the company’s keys to success, promise and outlook for growth, and career advice for a full house in Mays Business School’s Ray Auditorium.

Since 1901, the Fortune 500 Company has set its sights on being a forward-thinking retail business and has received numerous awards and recognition for its contributions to the industry. However, it wasn’t until the 1950s that Nordstrom, Inc. expanded beyond shoe sales and began the fast track toward its current position as a leader in fashionable apparel.

In 2014, Nordstrom named Texas A&M University a core partner school for recruitment in stores, headquarters roles and increasingly tech-savvy hires.

Nordstrom said he was attracted to visit Texas A&M by its sense of community, reputation and “the key ingredient for our business [of] people – talent.”

When he spoke, Nordstrom quickly dove into sharing the company’s business strategy by emphasizing the importance of paying attention to customers. “We live in an age where we have immediate access to things, especially at our fingertips, concerning fashion, product, price and availability,” he said.

Four-legged chair
Nordstrom provided an illustration of a four-legged chair to explain the company’s composition, which has created a launch pad for success and growth. He identified:

  1. 1. Full-line Nordstrom stores: Posting $7.7 billion in sales, Nordstrom’s brick-and-mortar sites make up 60 percent of the business. Although there is a large investment nationwide, the company has experienced multiple challenges from housing their stores in mall-based environments.
  2. eCommerce and online sales: This is the fastest-growing area of business for the company.
  3. Nordstrom Rack stores: Attracting the younger, aspirational generation, the Rack is an expanding channel for Nordstrom. The off-price model targets an entirely new demographic and method to gaining new customers and paving way for new merchandising in full-line stores.
  4. On-line off-price: As Nordstrom said, it’s all about acquisition “in the name of speed.” By acquiring flash sale site HauteLook in 2011, the company can compete with Amazon, offering dynamic price strategy online, increasing momentum and sales, something that cannot be done quickly in-store.

The “multi-channel” chair, combined with Nordstrom’s exceptional and unique approach to customer service, creates a seamless environment for the company that cannot be replicated. When companies follow the inverted pyramid and place the customer on top and senior executives on the bottom, “When we think about what [they] value the most, it gives us the most clarity of how we should focus our time, energy and money where the business is going,” Nordstrom said.

Challenges faced

Death of the mall
As Nordstrom mentioned, malls pose a unique challenge but also provide opportunity for looking outside the confinements of being in-store. With the increase in ecommerce, retailers, including Nordstrom, are sensitive to a third-year decline in foot traffic in malls across America. The company has had to identify, expand and take more risks, because “if you don’t take [them], you just add age to yourself as a retailer.”

Amazon.com
Although Amazon was identified as one of the top competitors for the company, Nordstrom was quick to commend the online giant as a leader in expedited decision making and “laser focus on the customer,” even when it means taking a financial loss. Especially in Seattle, the two compete for jobs, talent and square feet. Amazon also has infinitely more fulfillment centers than Nordstrom, coming in at around 50 versus Nordstrom’s two, with an additional three on the way.

People culture
Nordstrom uses the saying “from service to sales,” because customer-based service influences every aspect that makes the company run successfully, including board members and stakeholders.

The company is working on a number of ways to cater to different audiences and customize service. According to Nordstrom, “If someone wants to spend an hour [in our stores], great, we should be able to do that. But, if they want to get in and get out in five minutes, that’s good service too.”

He also emphasized the importance of his 60,000 team members, saying he hopes each person comes to work highly motivated and knowing they are making a tremendous impact as the face of the company.

This is also true of how the family operates the business. “We have a team approach,” he said, “Everyone leaves our meetings on the same page and because we all work together, our outcome is richer.” In fact, Nordstrom would rather be invisible as to not detract from the company’s mission of people, not person, first.

Maintaining a company culture of treating everyone with value and importance remains at the forefront of Nordstrom, Inc.

Words of wisdom
As a father of two, Nordstrom understands the stresses of transitioning from higher education to the job market. With anywhere from five to eight career changes in a lifetime, he said, it’s important to shift your focus early on to your “experiences [and] how you are in control of the few things you actually own, which are your character, reputation and integrity.” Instead, he advised, ask yourself how those traits can help you open doors.

He also mentioned the importance of having a “truth teller” or mentor with whom you can be open and honest, even in your failures. Often, the biggest learning moments occur during the worst situations and it’s essential for you to be able to put it all into perspective. Having someone else to talk things through can help you do that.

Goal setting
During the final portion of the lecture, Nordstrom touched upon the company’s expansion into Canada and plans for future growth across the United States.

Nordstrom has set some high goals in the next several years, including a goal of $20 billion in sales by 2020 and a new store in New York, opening in late 2018. The 300,000-square-foot store will span seven floors and employ more than 2,000 team members. It will be located in the second-highest building in the city and will overlook Central Park and Columbus Circle.

Nordstrom added, “We don’t really need more stores, but instead need to expand and improve on what we are currently doing.”

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL
Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,600 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Centers, Executive Speakers

U.S.News

The Full-Time MBA program at Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School improved its standing over last year in the latest U.S. News & World Report (2016) “Best Business Schools” rankings of graduate business schools. Among public universities Mays ranked in the top 10, tying for 9th place with the University of Minnesota. In a three-way tie, Mays is 27th overall in the U.S., again with the University of Minnesota and Vanderbilt.

Mary Lea McAnally, Mays associate dean for graduate programs, said the rankings are a testament to the value employers place on our graduates. “Our statistics on employment three months after graduation are the second strongest among public universities, and fourth in the nation,” she stated. “This speaks to the heart of students’ goals in seeking an MBA. I am pleased our program is recognized for success in employment outcomes.”

The U.S. News rankings are based on three types of data: quality assessment from dean and director surveys, statistical indicators that measure employment salary and placement success, and student selectivity. U.S. News surveyed all of the accredited AACSB business schools (464) and thousands of academics and professionals to arrive at these rankings. For further information, visit the U.S. News “Best Business Schools” website.

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL
Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,600 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Mays Business

Blake Petty

The Aggie Angel Network (AAN) has announced an operational agreement with the Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship (CNVE) in Mays Business School at Texas A&M University. The AAN is a private, not-for-profit investor network that links early-stage entrepreneurial ventures with capital from early-stage investors (also called “Angel Investors”). CNVE Director Blake Petty will concurrently serve as executive director of the Aggie Angel Network, in an ex-officio role.

Under the agreement, CNVE will provide operational and programmatic support to AAN and its membership of individual and institutional Angel Investors. Through its affiliation with CNVE, the AAN aims to grow a closer relationship to Texas A&M, broadening the scope and reach of its investment influence and impact on the entrepreneurial ecosystem in and around the university.

AAN will continue to be managed by an independent board of directors, who have named CNVE Director Blake Petty to concurrently serve as executive director of the Aggie Angel Network, in an ex-officio role. Petty has been a member of the AAN board of directors since 2013, but will step down from the board to serve in this new capacity.

In addition to his leadership in campus-wide student and faculty entrepreneurship initiatives through the CNVE, Petty brings more than a decade of experience in technology commercialization and industry-sponsored research program development. “I’ve seen a growing number of universities recognize the value of having sustained access to an angel investor network. Many are beginning to establish their own affinity-based angel networks to fill a tremendous gap in the university’s commercialization, entrepreneurship, and economic development efforts,” said Petty, who is a two-degree alumnus of Texas A&M and has worked at the university for 17 years.

“We’re fortunate that the Aggie Angel Network, launched in 2010 by former students and local community leaders, already has an established reputation as a leading angel network amongst its peers,” he continued. “I am excited about the opportunity to build even closer ties between AAN and Texas A&M, and envision the CNVE leveraging this affiliation toward meaningful engagement opportunities for our entrepreneurial students ¬- both current and former.”

Richard Lester, executive director of the CNVE since 2007, said he is equally excited about the collaboration. “This relationship has the potential to significantly move forward all our entrepreneurial programs, from Startup Aggieland to 3-Day Startup,” he said. “Closer ties between the AAN and our entrepreneurially minded students will benefit all.”

As AAN executive director, Petty lists among his early goals the development of a strategy for growth and increased involvement of the membership, along with educational and mentorship opportunities for both network members and student apprentices interested in becoming involved, either as entrepreneurs or as potential Aggie Angels in the future.

AAN screens and mentors early stage companies, extending to qualified candidates an invitation to pitch to the membership for potential investment. AAN does not manage an investment fund, nor does AAN invest directly in any companies. AAN does not provide its members or others any investment guidance or advice and is not endorsing or offering prospective investment opportunities. Members are solely responsible for their individual and independent investment decisions.

AAN consists of more than 50 SEC-accredited individual investors, including two independent institutional fund members. AAN individual members self-certify their qualifications as high-net-worth individual investors and provide an annual membership fee to cover administrative and meeting expenses. AAN hosts six pitch meetings annually, typically showcasing five candidate companies at each, and offers access to a larger portfolio of opportunities through its memberships in the Angel Capital Association (ACA) and the Alliance of Texas Angel Networks (ATAN).

From 2010 through 2014, AAN members invested over $8.5 million across 27 early-stage companies in a variety of industries. Investments by AAN members typically average $300,000, but have varied widely, ranging from as small as $5,000 to as large as $1.5 million per company.

For more information or to join the Aggie Angel Network, visit aggieangelnetwork.com or contact Petty at blakepetty@tamu.edu.

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL
Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,600 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Mays Business

Dr. Eli Jones

The Board of Regents of the Texas A&M University System has approved the appointment of Eli Jones ’82 as dean of Mays Business School. Jones is currently dean of the Sam M. Walton College of Business and the Sam M. Walton Leadership Chair at the University of Arkansas. He will assume his new position at Mays on July 1.

Prior to accepting his current appointment at Arkansas, Jones served as dean of the E.J. Ourso College of Business at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. Before that, he was the founding executive director of the Sales Excellence Institute, an associate dean and professor of marketing at the University of Houston, where he worked for 11 years.

“Mays Business School is uniquely positioned to play a transformational role in business research and education,” said Ricky Griffin, interim dean of Mays Business School. “Dr. Eli Jones has the right combination of experience, acumen and vision to lead our school through this exciting period. I look forward to working with Dr. Jones as he transitions to Mays, and then following his lead after he arrives.”

Jones will be returning to Texas A&M, where he earned his bachelor’s in journalism, his MBA and his PhD in marketing. His research interests are in sales, sales management and marketing strategy. His teaching interests are strategic selling, advanced professional selling, key accounts selling, sales leadership and marketing strategy.

“There’s nothing sweeter than the sound of home,” Jones said. “My wife and I are excited about returning to Aggieland and becoming an integral part of my alma mater. Texas A&M University and Mays Business School have been on an upward trajectory for some time, and I know that’s definitely a tradition that the talented faculty, dedicated staff and wonderful students want to continue. I appreciate Dr. Ricky Griffin for his leadership during the transition.”

In 2009, Jones was a recipient of Mays Business School’s Outstanding Doctoral Alumni Award. The late Jeff Conant, former head of the marketing department at Mays, called Jones “one of our most outstanding doctoral students in the mid ’90s.”

“From the first moment I met Eli, I knew he was destined for greatness and major leadership roles,” Conant said in 2009. “He understands the multiple missions of large universities and has personally made effective teaching, conducting relevant research and serving our discipline through professional service, high priorities in his career.”

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL
Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,900 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Mays Business

military times

In its annual ranking of business schools that are “Best for Vets,” Military Times ranked Mays Business School as 5 th among the top 75 U.S. business schools in 2015. Mays also placed 5th among business schools in 2014.

In Military Times’ broader rankings, Texas A&M University ranked 7th among four-year colleges that are “Best for Vets.”

In the current Full-Time MBA class, 14 of the 58 members (24 percent) are military veterans — the largest cohort to date, and a reflection of the business school’s efforts to recruit veterans. They come from all branches of the military: Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard. Recruiting from the military branches has been intentional at Mays because employers recognize the preparedness of these students and the value they bring to the workplace.

Patti Urbina, director of the Full-Time MBA program, said the veterans make significant contributions to the classroom. “They bring great maturity and leadership skills from their first day,” she said. “They come in with a strong work ethic and an eagerness to transfer their military experience and training model to a civilian setting. The MBA experience provides the framework in which they will recalibrate their skills into a business context.”

Mays Interim Dean Ricky Griffin said the university’s character bolsters the MBA program. “The strong military tradition and core values of Texas A&M create an environment that supports the business school’s successful recruiting of military talent,” he said. “Today’s rankings reflect our commitment to honor veterans’ service and launch their transition to a successful business career. We could not be prouder to be recognized as a top business school for veterans.”
Mays provides several special programs and activities for military students, including a Military Preview Weekend and Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities, a mentoring program through the Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship.

For more about the rankings, visit their website.

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL
Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,600 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

ABOUT MILITARY TIMES
The Military Times digital platforms and newsweeklies are the trusted source for independent news and information for service members and their families. The military community relies on Air Force Times, Army Times, Marine Corps Times and Navy Times for reporting on everything important to their lives, including: pay, benefits, finance, education, health care, recreational resources, retirement, promotions, product reviews, and entertainment. Military Times is published by Gannett Government Media.

Categories: Mays Business

What started as a casual conversation between friends in a business honors course in November 2013 ultimately resulted in the founding of MSC Bethancourt – a program aimed at preparing students for a dynamic society through exposure to global perspectives, critical thinking challenges, and professional insights.

Their first event: hosting former First Lady Laura Bush and Razia Jan in Rudder Theater March 11.

The foundation of the organization began with a significant endowment from John ’74 and Debbie ’76 Bethancourt to establish a quality organization based on three criteria; high impact, prestigious and fills a niche.

When seniors, Clayton Alan (BHNRS), Kyle Murphy (BHNRS/FINC) and Peter Rozanski (CE) questioned what enhancements would have rounded out their college experience, they deduced that students were more likely to be focused on the graduate requirements of their majors than exposing themselves to a variety of subject matter – an essential element for the creation of the well-rounded academic thinker.

“We decided to attempt building a learning environment for people who loved learning about everything, even random things,” Clayton said. “The people who would be perfect for this organization, were like us – students who watched TedTalks for fun. We truly believed there was a demand for this.”

As MSC Bethancourt progressed, the committee finalized a student leadership team composed of Rozanski as chair, Clayton as vice chair and Murphy as internal development officer. They then added business honors juniors Alin Piranian as external relations officer and John Schomburger as finance officer and from the Bush school, senior political science major Samantha Krouse.

“The situation couldn’t have been any more ripe for delivering a quality organization. We not only had the latitude to create whatever we wanted (within the boundaries of the criteria), but we also could count on significant funding, and we were doing so as best friends,” Clayton said. “It takes a lot of trust from the MSC to give students the ability to spend a significant donor’s money, and we took our role as stewards very seriously.”

They plan to host “Professional Development Evenings” with professionals from various backgrounds to facilitate hands-on learning and interactive engagements. The featured guest provides the Bethancourt Associates with insights into their professional journeys and guides them through a case study or personal experience in their line of work. Additionally, the group will hold small events known as “Last Lectures,” in which distinguished professors are asked to speak about their topic of expertise in the form of their favorite lecture they would give to students if it were, in fact, their last lecture ever.

Finally, associates will take “Vision Trips,” which are best described as intimate, small group encounters with established professionals at their place of work. In this setting, students get to ask questions to important influencers of various industries. Typically, the setting for the conversations is in a conference room, and it often includes a tour of the organization.

The March 11 program with Laura Bush and Razia Jan is themed “Global Education.” It will explore the strides that education has taken throughout the world, as well as some educational challenges facing the international community.

Tickets for the event are on sale through the MSC Box Office (http://purchase.tickets.com/buy/TicketPurchase?orgid=326&pid=7978440)
as well as online. Prices are $5 for students and educators (with valid ID), and $10 for general admission.

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,600 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Mays Business

15046_027

Business schools across the country are using The Wall Street Journal as a tool to encourage their students to become more informed. Five weeks of studying the publication culminates each spring in the Wall Street Journal Challenge, which was hosted this year by Mays Business School.

Three-member teams compete in the challenge, which was established in 2014 and previously named the Fisher College of Business “Biz Quiz” at the Ohio State University.

This year’s challenge was Feb. 27 through March 1. In the individual challenge, each student competed in a three-part written test. In the team challenge, three-member teams responded to fast-paced oral questioning.

Representing Texas A&M University were first-time competitors and Business Honor students Joshua Chacko ’16, Logan McDivitt ’17 and Tyler Pavlas ’16.

The event was organized and led by Business Honors Advisor Eric Newman and Associate Dean and Professor Martha L. Loudder. Finance Executive Professor Ed White coached the Mays team. Jerry Strawser, former dean of Mays Business School, was moderator of the final round.

In attendance were teams of three undergraduates each from Texas A&M University, University of North Carolina, University of Texas, Miami University, University of Maryland, Emory University, University of Kentucky, Providence College, and University of Arizona.

The three top teams were tied after 85 questions into the 90-question final round. The University of Texas finished first by one point above Texas A&M, who was followed by the University of North Carolina in third place. For the individual round, Logan McDivitt of Texas A&M placed second.

Newman described the mood during the competition as tense, and said the audience members expressed awe at the competitors’ level of recall and understanding of the materials. “The competitors developed a great level of camaraderie with one another throughout the day,” he said. “They enjoyed the opportunity to get to know top students from peer institutions, and they were very congratulatory of one another’s accomplishments.”

McDivitt said he believed the team represented Mays and Texas A&M University very well. “Many of the opposing coaches were extremely complimentary of our team, our playing style, and our school,” he said.

 

 

Categories: Mays Business

clay

Second only to his family and friends, Clay Aderholt loved Texas A&M University, Mays Business School and the Christian fraternity Aggie Men’s Club. After Clay died in a car accident in May 2013 at age 36, a group of his best friends wanted to raise money to help Clay’s wife Allison and their two young children.

A host committee, chaired by Trey Able ’98, organized a golf tournament at Miramont Country Club in Bryan, and almost 100 people showed up to play and share stories about Clay. He had built a network of friends as a finance student at Mays, then as senior vice president of corporate banking with Texas Capital Bank. He and his family had deep roots in the Boerne community where they lived.

Able said he wanted to do something that would honor Clay. “It wasn’t all about golf. It was about getting together all these people who were from the different areas of Clay’s life and allowing them all to share stories and bond over his memories,” Able said. “We had carpools of people from lots of different areas of the state and different areas of his life – most of whom had never met, but who had Clay in common.”

The tournament netted $75,000 – enough to create a college fund for the two Aderholt children along with the Clay Aderholt ’99 Memorial Scholarship Fund, which provides two-year scholarships for four full-time Mays undergraduate students who are members of Aggie Men’s Club.

Allison raved about the golf event – especially the goodie bags filled with “Clay’s favorites”: A koozie in his favorite camo pattern and a chocolate chip cookie. The location of the tournament was fitting, too, she said, because he loved Aggieland so. “I felt like Clay bled maroon more and more, the longer he was away from there,” she said.

When the time came to select the scholarship recipients, the committee was headed up by Ben Welch, who is an academic advisor for Aggie Men’s Club as well as an assistant dean at Mays’ Center for Executive Development and a clinical professor in the Department of Management. That was fitting because Clay “really looked to Ben as a father figure,” Allison said.

At the 2014 Mays scholarship banquet, Clay’s wife, best friend and mentor got to sit with the recipients of his scholarships. “It was an honor to meet them and to hear about their plans,” Able said. “Even though they didn’t know Clay, they were carrying on his dreams, and that was good to hear.”

Ricky Griffin, interim dean of Mays Business School, expressed his appreciation for the project. “A gift that benefits our students while also honoring the memory of one of our beloved alumni often carries special significance,” he said. “The futures of Clay Aderholt’s wife and children have been eased by the generosity of so many of his friends.”

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL
Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,600 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Donors Corner, Mays Business