March, 2018 | Mays Impacts - Part 2

Roger Montemeyor headshot

Having grown up in Galveston, Texas, post Hurricane Alicia and during the 1980’s oil crisis, Roger Montemayor ’99 understands what it is like to live without. Montemayor, who received his bachelor’s degree in management from Texas A&M University, shared his path to success with current students and presented them with tips on how to be successful post-graduation.

Montemayor currently serves as Area President for Arthur J. Gallagher (AJG) and has served on the leadership team for AJG since his merger with them in 2016. During this time, Montemayor has led his team to exponential growth by innovating property and casualty insurance programs for a number of different industries that include public entities, energy, construction, manufacturing, and real estate. Montemayor recently visited with business honors students as part of the Mays Transformational Leader Speaker series, which recognizes leaders in today’s society and gives them an opportunity to share their knowledge with Mays students.

In the beginning of the session, Montemayor explained that his purpose, his drive, and his faith are the three main components of his success. “The most important piece of advice I can give to each and every one of you is to know your purpose,” he said. “Very few things in life will impact everything you do, but your purpose is one of them.”

Along with knowing your purpose, Montemayor used his life experiences to come up with three other pieces of advice for the students:

  • Your “go” has to be greater than your “know.” Knowledge is important, but a good education will mean nothing if you are lazy and have no sense of hustle.
  • Surround yourself with mentors and people you love. You lose your edge the moment you start thinking you have everything figured out. This is when mentors can come into play by helping you stay grounded.  Also, success means so much more when you share it with people you love, both at work and at home.
  • Paranoia is complacency’s greatest defense. “My company continues to grow because my competition stays complacent. Do not ever let yourself reach that point. Stay paranoid,” Montemayor said.

Although Montemayor is successful now, this was not always the case. When he was young, his dad was laid off, which led to some very tough times. His dad picked himself up and went all in on himself.  He went on to build one of the largest independently owned insurance agencies in his area.  He knew the risk, but he also knew what he had to do for his family.  Montemayor vowed to do the same.

“My dad is my biggest inspiration,” he said. Between the years of 2004 and 2016, Montemayor faced many challenges and tribulations, but his faith, motivation, and reminder of his father’s success kept him going.

As the session came to a close, Montemayor gave the students one last piece of advice: If you are ever doubting yourself, just remember his story. “I was rejected from Texas A&M twice before I was accepted, and I am probably not the smartest guy in this room,” he said. “I am where I am today because of my hustle, my drive, my faith, and this little piece of gold on my finger. The Aggie network is real, and I encourage each and every one of you to take advantage of it for the rest of your lives.”

Roger Montemeyor group photo

Categories: Alumni, Business Honors, Featured Stories, Former Students, Management, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

With around 200 attendees coming “together with technology,” The 19th annual Women in Information Technology Conference brought together women to network and learn from others currently building their careers in information technology. It was hosted by the Center for the Management of Information Systems (CMIS) on March 2 in the Memorial Student Center at Texas A&M University.

Female students with an interest in information technology participated in roundtable discussions on topics such as lessons learned from senior executives, managers, professionals and new graduates in the workforce. They also discussed advice such as finding a job, career building, finding a mentor and new technology trends.

After a welcome speech by Executive Professor and CMIS Director Robin Starnes, the conference attendees heard from three keynote speakers:

  • Amy Suhl, CIO, Shell Oil – #Makethefuture & ‘Aha’ Moments in Leadership
  • Diane Schwarz, VP and CIO, Textron – Tech Trends From My Career to Yours
  • Tammy Hermann, Director of IT, H-E-B – Mind-Blowing Tech – at the grocery store?

In her presentation, Suhl advised the women to “get clear on what you will be measured on.” This is done through credibility, reliability, and intimacy, which all culminates into trust. Key components of leadership Suhl spoke on were performance, image, and exposure.

When sharing “Tech Trends,” Schwarz shed light on self-healing, shared insights from security in the past, explained the concept of how technology constantly changes, and highlighted the benefits of mentoring and listening.

Hermann’s presentation on “Mind-Blowing Tech – at the grocery store?” outlined Gig economies, the desire for conversation, short attention spans, and how tech

The conference ended with the announcement of door prize winners including two iPads provided by the Texas A&M IT department, a Katie Decker pendant donated by David Gardner’s Jewelers, $500 in scholarship funds, and many more. All guests received gift bags as well.

Feedback on the event was positive, with guests commenting that “the ratio of company representatives to students ratio at the tables was perfect this year,” and that the “speakers were great, but the best part was interacting with the students and being able to trade advice.”

CMIS will celebrate its 20th annual Women in IT Conference on March 1, 2019, at the Annenberg Presidential Conference Center.

 

 

 

Categories: Departments, Diversity and Inclusion, Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Spotlights, Students, Texas A&M

Mays Business School announces its 2018 Corporate Partner of the Year EY, one of the leading employers of Mays graduates. In particular, graduates from the PPA program at Mays have moved into leadership positions in EY.

To celebrate, March 22 will be EY Corporate Day in Mays Business School as part of the Mays Connection program, which celebrates the school’s partnerships with businesses and former students.

Mays will host a presentation of the award in the lobby of the Wehner Building, as well as speakers and visits to classrooms by various EY employees. A presentation of the award will be 11-11:30 in the Wehner Atrium.

From 9:30-10:45 a.m., Allison Allen, Southwest Talent Leader at EY and “Working Mother of the Year” from Working Mother magazine, will speak in Wehner 187. From 1 to 2 p.m. in Wehner 190, Annaliese Schumacher, EY’s Southwest Campus Recruiting Leader, will present “Professional of the Future,” which will highlight how students will need to adapt to the changes in the workplace.

EY is a multinational professional services firm headquartered in London, England. EY is one of the largest professional services firms in the world and is one of the “Big Four” accounting firms.

It is one of Texas A&M’s top employers, hiring hundreds of graduates each year in multiple disciplines.

“When selecting this year’s honoree, EY came quickly to mind because of their reciprocal partnership with the school,” said Mays Dean Eli Jones. “Not only do they provide financial support and devote their time to our students, they also groom our graduates for management positions. It is a cycle of success.”

One of those graduates, Randy Cain ’82, has held a variety of leadership roles throughout the course of 30+ years with EY. He is Vice Chair and Southwest Region Managing Partner for EY, responsible for the firm’s practice across nine states with more than 4,000 people in 14 offices. Previously, he served as the Southwest Region Tax Managing Partner and San Antonio Office Managing Partner.

Other Mays graduates in leadership positions at EY leaders plan to visit on March 22, including Partner Christy Baumann ’95 and Tax Partner Andy Beakey ’84.

For more information about the events planned that day, contact Cindy Billington.

 

Categories: Accounting, Dean Eli Jones, Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M

After serving as the Class of 2019 president three years in a row, Mays management junior Amy Sharp readily steps up as the next Texas A&M University Student Body President. She received 66.03 percent of the votes.

Sharp grew up in Conroe, Texas, where she attended Oak Ridge High School before coming to Texas A&M. From the start of her college experience, Sharp knew she wanted to make a difference on campus. As student body president, Sharp will focus on three things: academic improvement, increased inclusion, and improved access to mental and physical health services.

“A student body president’s job is to represent student voices in all affairs and amplify them to any platform necessary to enact positive change,” Sharp said. As the student body president-elect, I am committed to embodying the Texas Aggie core value of selfless service by working tirelessly to serve students.”

Sharp and her supporters spent weeks poring over the platform they had written together, brainstorming ideas to set them apart from the competition, and coordinating the execution of their plans. By the time the four-day campaign period started, Sharp and her team were ready to convince all students why Sharp should be elected student body president. “My team put forth an incredible campaign that was meticulous, genuine, and bursting with integrity, and that is exactly what we set out to do,” Sharp said.

A long-time leader

Along with her recurring role as Class of 2019 president, Sharp has also been actively involved in the business honors program during her time at Mays Business School. Through business honors, Sharp has been able to network with executive speakers, travel to businesses across the country, and grow as a leader both inside and outside of the classroom.

“The community that I have been surrounded by in business honors has been so supportive,” Sharp said. “All of the students in business honors are hard- working, kind, impact-driven individuals who want each other to succeed, and I get the honor of sitting next to them in class and learning from them on a daily basis.”

While in the role of student body president, Sharp hopes she can work to build bridges between the student body and the Student Government Association. “I will make it a priority to meet students where they are and build relationships with them, because I know this is the best way to understand the student experience on our campus,” she said. By creating a stellar classroom experience, making Texas A&M a more inclusive campus, and improving the quality of mental and physical health care services, Sharp hopes to improve the college experience for many Aggies.

Sharp will take office on April 21 after current student body president Bobby Brooks completes his term with a speech at the campus Muster ceremony. As the time to take office comes closer, Sharp cannot help but think about what Mays has done for her the past three years. “My courses at Mays have taught me much about giving back, integrity, and choosing styles of leadership, all of which will be very necessary skills and knowledge points as I begin to serve Texas A&M as student body president,” Sharp said.

After she graduates, she is hoping to pursue her passions of helping people with mental health and substance abuse problems, as well as relieve children in poverty. She is applying for 2+2 programs and hopes to pursue an MBA.

Categories: Business Honors, Diversity and Inclusion, Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

When 54 business undergraduate students got on a bus, filled mostly with strangers, and traveled to Stoney Creek Ranch for a three-day retreat in late February, building lasting friendships wasn’t what most of them expected. But through speaker sessions, small group discussions, and personal reflection time, the SUMMIT conference communicated one thing consistently: people matter to your story, and you matter to other people’s stories.

In the words of one delegate, “I think this really came out of the social impact mindset. You really think more about other people’s stories. Step into someone else’s shoes, you know?”

Several delegates said the conference pushed them to think differently about creating opportunities, using their unique strengths and valuing the strengths of others. “I can more comfortably find ways to learn from others, and maybe even let them learn from me, too.”

The purpose of SUMMIT (Students Understanding, Maximizing, and Mentoring Individual Talent) is to empower students as developing leaders through purposeful reflection and honest self-awareness. Whether students participate as freshmen or seniors, SUMMIT challenges students to think about how they can intentionally shape their own story and influence the people and organizations to which they are connected.

“Smile more,” said Alec Calvillo ’19. “The people around you matter, and sometimes all it takes to let them know that is to smile.”

Lauren Secrest wrapped it up perfectly. “The SUMMIT experience changes who you are and what you think based on what you are going through right now. I’m not sure you can say this is what SUMMIT is about or that is what SUMMIT is about. Just go and find out!”

SUMMIT accomplishes this by:

  • Equipping student facilitators to lead small group discussions with conference delegates on topics such as values, resilience, dreams and goals, and personality assessments
  • Challenging student participants (delegates, facilitators, and executive team) to think intentionally about choices they make and the habits they build
  • Offering a model for meaningful dialogue about difficult topics using productive vulnerability
  • By Jeana Guillory

Categories: Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Spotlights, Students, Texas A&M, Uncategorized

Mays Business School was ranked #1 in the SEC, #1 in the Southwest, and #3 nationally out of 150 U.S. business schools in terms of management research productivity in 2017. CEOWORLD Magazine recently announced the rankings.

The rankings reflect publications in a given calendar year. The number of publications that came out “in print” from Mays Business School was 16 in 2017, and 57 in the last five years.

Texas A&M has helped compile these rankings since 2006, initially with the University of Florida and now with the University of Georgia. The methodology behind the ranking has stayed consistent since the rankings inception in 2002, with the TAMUGA rankings tracking productivity in eight top-tier journals in management including:

  • Academy of Management Journal
  • Academy of Management Review
  • Administrative Science Quarterly
  • Journal of Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
  • Organization Science
  • Personnel Psychology
  • Strategic Management Journal

Mays Associate Professor Cindy Zapata handles this ranking process for Mays, in partnership with UGA. She started doing Texas A&M’s portion of the rankings in 2014 when she moved from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

“The Department of Management in Mays Business School has long been recognized as a leader in scholarly research. Our faculty have consistently been among the most productive management scholars in the world,” said Wendy Boswell, head of the Department of Management. “What perhaps sets us apart from many other institutions is the breadth of our faculty expertise, developing and applying innovative theory and contributing important practical insights in the areas of strategic management, organizational behavior, human resource management, business and international policy, legal studies, and entrepreneurship. The Department of Management at Mays is truly a remarkable group to be a part of.”

 

Categories: Management, Mays Business, News, Rankings, Texas A&M

This year’s 4th Annual Leadership Initiative Conference (LINC) brought 50 admitted high school seniors from all across the state of Texas, from Plano to Brownsville to Beaumont, and everywhere in between, to Texas A&M University the last weekend of February.

LINC introduces talented admitted students to the Mays Transformational Leader framework, with an emphasis on the mindsets, core competencies, and collaborative community that sets Mays apart from other undergraduate business programs.

Selected “delegates” participated in small group discussions led by small group leaders who are current Mays undergraduate students. On the second day of the conference, attendees competed in a case competition focused on ethical decision making.

Additionally, these admitted students experienced interactive lectures and presentations from faculty and staff members including Dr. Annie McGowan, Dr. Mike Shaub, Patrick Williams, Bailey Urban, and Claire Raabe.

This year, LINC was directed by junior finance major Brandon Biavaschi and sophomore management major Deborah Rao. The staff directors for the program are Jeana Guillory and Corey Stone.

Founded by Andres Bustos in 2015, with support from Marty Loudder, LINC operates as a collaboration between Undergraduate Special Programs and Undergraduate Recruiting. LINC remains a key resource in matriculating Texas’ top future undergraduate business students.

Revealing the Mays entreneurial mindset video in the final session of the conference, which features Bustos and Loudder discussing the creation of LINC, reinforced the value of student leadership and innovation at Mays, and attending delegates left the conference informed and excited about transformational leadership at Mays Business School.

 

 

Categories: Featured Stories, Mays Business, Spotlights, Students, Texas A&M