The new Mays Innovation Research Center has an inaugural director: Mays Business School professor Korok Ray, who conceptualized the center as a place to discover how and when innovation occurs, then transfer that knowledge to Texas A&M University students.

Ray, an associate professor of accounting, will lead the center to provide research support to existing and new faculty members across the Texas A&M campus. It will bridge the research at Mays with that occurring in engineering, business, liberal arts, and other academic disciplines. The center will also fund Ph.D. fellowships and undergraduate research opportunities, and award prizes for outstanding research that advances the center’s mission.

Ray’s research interests are performance measurement, compensation, corporate governance, and cost allocation. He has taught accounting at Texas A&M University, the University of Chicago and Georgetown University, and earned his Ph.D. from Stanford University. He also served as the senior economist on the Council of Economic Advisers in the White House from 2007 to 2009.

Ray said he has experienced strong support for the concept. “Dean (Eli) Jones, The Texas A&M Foundation, and our donors have been outstanding in their support of this vision from the beginning,” he said. “I’m thrilled and honored to lead this center into new and uncharted territory, as the conversation on innovation unfolds both on our campus and nationally.  The center will engage students in research, support faculty, and pursue opportunities unique to Texas A&M, with its special combination of first-tier research and first-class values.”

…Read more

Categories: Accounting, Centers, Dean Eli Jones, Entrepreneurship, Faculty, Featured Stories, Mays Business, Mays Innovation Research Center, News, Research, Texas A&M

By Venky Shankar

11/11 or November 11 is celebrated as the World’s Singles Day. It is an entertaining event widely popular among Chinese people. November 11 was chosen because it contains multiple instances of the number one that best represents an individual alone. In recent times, it has also become the day with the biggest single day sales. Promoted by giant Chinese e-commerce retailer Alibaba as a mega sales day event, revenues from the Singles Day has grown exponentially from just $100 million in 2009 to $18 billion in 2016. This year, Alibaba’s Singles Day sales are expected to reach $22 billion.

But Alibaba is not alone in this journey. JD.com, its main Chinese online rival, has teamed up with Tencent, another Chinese online behemoth, and Walmart to cash in on the binge buying that takes place that day. Although Alibaba cornered about 71 percent of overall single day revenues last year, its competitors may be able to bite into more of its share this year.

Such is the volume of online sales on Singles Day that it trounces sales done on other mega event days, including Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and Amazon Prime Day, which are also expected to rise this year. By comparison, Black Friday and Cyber Monday online sales totaled $6.8 billion in 2016.

Why is Singles Day important for the future? By 2022, Chinese middle-class shoppers are predicted to surpass U.S. shoppers both in number (550 million vs. 340 million) and spending. Because it is online, Singles Day offers the potential of tapping into global shoppers for maximizing sales revenue for many U.S. retailers as well.

With all these online excitement, where is retail headed? Globally, more commerce is moving rapidly online as shoppers use more of their mobile devices and online channels to browse, compare, click, purchase and return items, and communicate with others and retailers.

That doesn’t mean physical stores are getting irrelevant. True, some of the predominantly brick-and-mortar retailers such as Sears and Macy’s are struggling. However, omnichannel retailers such as Walmart and Best Buy are thriving. Even pure e-commerce retailers such as Amazon are moving offline. Amazon is opening physical bookstores, bought Wholefoods, partnering with Kohl’s to handle product returns, and is testing a new self-scanning and electronic paying store concept called Amazon Go. Even Alibaba has acquired In-Time department stores and has its own experimental He Ma supermarket stores. In addition, it has enabled 100,000 convenience stores to become smart centers. Shoppers want 360-degree access to retail from multiple touchpoints and demand a seamless experience. The retail universe is becoming an increasingly mobile-led omnichannel universe.

Whatever the prediction for the future, one thing is clear: Sales on Singles day is going to get only bigger this year.

—-

Venky Shankar is the Coleman Chair Professor in Marketing at Mays Business School as well as director of research at Texas A&M University’s Center for Retailing Studies. His areas of specialization include digital business, marketing strategy, innovation, retailing, international marketing, and pricing.

Categories: Center for Retailing Studies, Centers, Faculty, Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Research, Texas A&M

Mays Business School’s Department of Management hosted an extension conference Oct. 26-27 that explored new directions in international corporate governance research. The event, which was an extension of the main Strategic Management Society’s (SMS) annual conference in Houston, took place at the Mays CityCentre facility. The extension conference built on the SMS Annual Conference theme of “Convergence and Intensity of Global Competition.” It focused on the continued importance of new directions in research on international corporate governance.

Professors Laszlo Tihanyi and Mike Withers served as co-organizers of the event. During the conference, a number of panel discussions, featuring leading scholars whose research has helped move the international corporate governance literature to its current prominent position in the strategic management discipline, were available to conference attendees.

…Read more

Categories: Departments, Faculty, Featured Stories, Management, Mays Business, News, Ph.D., Texas A&M

Students in Professor Henry Musoma’s Survey of Management course had the opportunity to hear from Robert Carter, a psychologist working in Student Counseling Services at Texas A&M University and a dear friend of Musoma’s.

The topic of the day was “Managing Interpersonal Relations and Communications,” so the main point of the discussion was simple. In Carter’s words, “the key to management is communication. You have to reach and connect with people in ways that truly allow for communication to happen.”

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Categories: Departments, Faculty, Featured Stories, Management, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

Ellen DeGeneres has joined the club – she is smitten with Emmett Robinson. The 10-month-old charmer is the son of single mother and Texas A&M junior Ashton Robison, who stirred a whirlwind of social media attention with her Facebook post two weeks ago. She thanked her professor at Mays Business School, Henry Musoma, for inviting her to bring Emmett to class when she didn’t have a babysitter.

The three of them were invited to “The Ellen DeGeneres Show,” which aired Thursday (Sept. 21).

Musoma, a clinical assistant professor at Mays, teaches “Ethical Decision Making and Conduct” at Mays and “International Leadership” at the Bush School of Government and Public Service. He is also assistant director of the Mays Center for International Business Studies.

To recognize Musoma for his selfless service, Dean Eli Jones gave him the first Mays Business School Spirit Award on Sept. 14 after surprising Musoma in his classroom.

“One of the things that we pride ourselves on at Mays Business School is having a community that’s connected, a community that’s caring. That’s all part of our Strategic Plan,” Jones said. “But he’s not doing it for the Strategic Plan. He’s not doing it because of our culture, necessarily. He’s doing it because this is who he is.”

Mays Business School steps up to advance the world’s prosperity. Its mission is to be a vibrant learning organization that creates impactful knowledge and develops transformational leaders. Mays Business School educates more than 6,200 undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its programs and for faculty research.

ABOUT MAYS BUSINESS SCHOOL

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,900 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, business, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Center for Business International Studies, Faculty, Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

The story of Mays Business School Professor Henry Musoma and Texas A&M University student Ashton Robinson has surprised them both as it has rippled through personal and corporate social media outlets worldwide.

Robinson, a single mom, told Musoma last Thursday she would not be able to attend class because she couldn’t find a babysitter. Instead of giving her the class notes, as she had asked, Musoma encouraged her to bring the baby to class. Toward the end of the class period, Musoma – the father of four – picked up a restless young Emmett and held him as he finished his lecture.

Robinson posted on Facebook how impactful Musoma’s gesture was to her: “Being a single mom is so challenging but it’s people like Dr. Henry Musoma that make life just a tiny bit easier! THIS is why I’m so proud to be an Aggie! Definitely something I’ll never forget and can’t wait to someday tell Emmett that it’s because of people like this that mommy was able to graduate from the best university in the world.”

Five hours later, those six lines had spread worldwide, and Musoma heard from friends, former students, the president of Texas A&M University, and family members in his home country of Zambia, Africa.

“I never imagined such a thing would happen,” Musoma said. “I was just trying to make sure she had the support she needs to succeed – as I would for any student.”

Musoma teaches “Ethical Decision Making and Conduct” at Mays and International Leadership at the Bush School of Government and Public Service.

The story continues

During that same class period Thursday, Mays Business School Dean Eli Jones surprised Musoma with an award – the first Mays Business School Spirit Award. The plaque reads, “For your selfless service and dedication to students and their educational needs and pursuits and for your heart for building community.”

“One of the things that we pride ourselves on at Mays Business School is having a community that’s connected, a community that’s caring. That’s all part of our Strategic Plan,” Jones said. “But he’s not doing it for the Strategic Plan. He’s not doing it because of our culture, necessarily. He’s doing it because this is who he is.”

Jones was joined in the auditorium by Marty Loudder, associate dean of undergraduate programs; Duane Ireland, executive associate dean; and Wendy Boswell, head of the management department.

After a few moments of silence, Musoma broke into an impromptu lecture. “When you do kind deeds you never die. So when you are a generous person, you have no fear of death.”

Then in another act of selflessness, he led the class in singing “Happy birthday” to one of the students before beginning his lecture.

Ashton Robinson and Henry Musoma are surprised in class by Dean Eli Jones and Marty Loudder, associate dean of undergraduate programs; Wendy Boswell, head of the management department; and Duane Ireland, executive associate dean. Credit – Taylor Stephens

 

Categories: Center for Business International Studies, Dean Eli Jones, Faculty, Featured Stories, Management, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

Mays faculty, staff, and students stepped in and stepped up to provide monetary aid and goods after Hurricane Harvey. One effort was #BTHOHarvey, a student-led initiative that has raised more than $350,000 in monetary donations and collected thousands of donated goods, in partnership with former student Von Miller, who is the honorary captain of #BTHOHarvey.

#BTHOHarvey organized a Donation Drive Rally where four large trucks, donated by Conlee-Garrett Moving, and an Army hauler were filled with goods that were distributed to Rosenberg, Beaumont, and Port Arthur. Clinical Assistant Professor Henry Musoma was the keynote speaker for the Donation Drive Rally, and Recruiter/Academic Advisor Corey Stone has served as the staff advisor for the #BTHOHarvey initiative.  At Texas A&M University’s home opener football game, #BTHOHarvey partnered with Aggie Athletics, Maroon Out, and CC Creations to coordinate a “Relief Out,” where thousands of T-shirts were sold, resulting in additional donated funds to relief efforts.  The initiative is currently finalizing plans for fall volunteer outreach events along the Gulf Coast region and is partnering with President Michael K. Young and the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation to raise additional funds via the Hurricane Relief for Aggies Fund and the One America Appeal.

At Texas A&M University’s home opener football game, #BTHOHarvey partnered with Aggie Athletics, Maroon Out, and CC Creations to coordinate a “Relief Out,” where thousands of T-shirts were sold, resulting in additional donated funds to relief efforts.  The initiative is currently finalizing plans for fall volunteer outreach events along the Gulf Coast region and is partnering with President Michael K. Young and the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation to raise additional funds via the Hurricane Relief for Aggies Fund and the One America Appeal.

Plans are being finalized for fall volunteer outreach events along the Gulf Coast region. Organizers are partnering with President Michael K. Young and the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation to raise additional funds via the Hurricane Relief for Aggies Fund and the One America Appeal.

At Texas A&M University’s home opener football game on Sept. 2, #BTHOHarvey partnered with Aggie Athletics, Maroon Out, and CC Creations to coordinate a “Relief Out” where thousands of T-shirts were sold, resulting in additional donated funds to relief efforts.

The initiative is currently finalizing plans for fall volunteer outreach events along the Gulf Coast region and is partnering with President Michael K. Young and the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation to raise additional funds via the Hurricane Relief for Aggies Fund and the One America Appeal.

BTHO Harvey Mission Statement:
Driven by selfless service, BTHO Harvey is a network that connects current students, former students, and other members of the Texas A&M community in an effort to provide both immediate and long-term relief to those impacted by Hurricane Harvey.

Learn more at Texas A&M Today.

Categories: Faculty, Mays Business, News, Staff, Students, Texas A&M

By Texas A&M Foundation

The Texas A&M Foundation has received two lead gifts totaling $4 million in a $10 million fundraising campaign to name the Department of Accounting in honor of James J. Benjamin in Mays Business School at Texas A&M University. David Baggett, a 1981 graduate of the university with a degree in accounting, and his wife Denise have committed $2 million to the campaign. Ernst & Young has also committed a gift of the same amount. Both gifts will be endowed to support the needs of the department and to ensure its future growth.

The idea to name the Department of Accounting resulted after discussions between Mays Business School, David Baggett and Ernst & Young partner, T. Randall “Randy” Cain, a 1982 graduate from the accounting program and a Texas A&M Foundation trustee. James Benjamin was presented as a worthwhile namesake for the department because of his decades-long commitment to students. The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents recently approved the naming of the James J. Benjamin Department of Accounting.

“The Department of Accounting at Texas A&M is one of the leading accounting programs in the United States, largely due to Dr. Jim Benjamin’s leadership over 35 years as department head,” said Eli Jones, dean of Mays Business School. “In recognition of his extraordinary leadership and selfless service, former students David Baggett ’81 and Randy Cain ’82 have co-led the fundraising effort to name the department in honor of Dr. Benjamin. This funding will help sustain efforts in the department to maintain its national prominence in accounting research and teaching.”

The campaign to name the Department of Accounting is intended to enhance the visibility of the department and provide young people in the field additional opportunities to explore the accounting profession. In addition, the endowment will allow the department to recruit outstanding faculty, develop international opportunities for students to learn global accounting practices, and support high-impact educational programs, such as the Professional Program and the Energy Accounting Program.

Benjamin is the Deloitte Foundation Leadership Professor and head of the accounting department. He joined the faculty at Texas A&M in 1974 and has served as department head since 1982. After attaining his undergraduate degree and CPA license, he received his M.B.A. and DBA degrees from Indiana University. He previously served as the Ph.D. coordinator for Mays Business School and director of the school’s honors program.

“Over the past almost four decades, Jim Benjamin has been a driving force in the transformation of our business school,” said David Baggett. “When I came to Texas A&M in 1979, we were known largely as an engineering and agricultural school.” Today, some 38 years later, the Mays Business School undergraduate accounting program is consistently recognized in the top 10 among public universities, while the bachelor’s, master’s and Ph.D. programs made Public Accounting Report’s top 10 list for 2017.

“With Jim’s personality, business savvy and leadership skills, he would have been very successful in the corporate world,” added Baggett. “Fortunately for me and thousands of other accounting and business graduates, Jim dedicated himself to our success.”

“We are excited to be part of this effort to name the accounting department after Dr. Jim Benjamin and know the resulting endowment will serve future students for decades to come,” said Denise Baggett.

Half of the Baggetts’ contribution to the accounting program campaign will create a matching gift fund to encourage other donors to contribute to the cause.

“At Ernst & Young we are a purpose-driven organization focused on building a better working world,” said Cain. “When I think of Texas A&M, I can’t think of a better place to invest when we’re trying to live our purpose. Students come out with a set of instilled values, and this marries up with the EY purpose. You have to give credit to Jim Benjamin, who has been an extraordinary visionary in the world of accounting education.”

In addition to the two lead gifts to the campaign, Mays Business School has also received commitments from KPMG LLP, Deloitte, Karen Pape ’80, Karen and Rodney Faldyn ’88, Becky ’76 and Monty Davis ’77, Lina and Kenny Lawson, Marian ’82 and Willie Langston ’81, Wanda and Lou Paletta ’78, and Kay ’02 and Jerry Cox ’72, Tracy and Randy Hale ’85, and Mark Kelly ’79. Combined, these pledges, along with other commitments, total nearly $7.5 million.

“I was humbled and honored when I learned of the initiative to name the Department of Accounting,” said Benjamin. “While I have been gratified to be a part of the growth and success of the accounting program, I have always recognized that our growing reputation was a product of exceptional students and talented and dedicated faculty. I have been truly blessed to be surrounded by such great students, faculty and former students throughout my career.”

All gifts toward the James J. Benjamin Department of Accounting naming also count toward the Texas A&M “Lead by Example” campaign, which aims to raise $4 billion by the year 2020. If you wish to make an endowed gift of $25,000 or more to support the naming initiative, contact Brian Bishop at (979) 862-3615 or bbishop@txamfoundation.com. You can also contribute non-endowed gifts online at give.am/JamesBenjamin.

Mays Business School

Mays Business School’s vision is to advance the world’s prosperity. Their mission is to provide a vibrant learning organization that creates impactful knowledge and develops transformational leaders. Mays Business School educates more than 6,200 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its programs and faculty research.

Texas A&M Foundation 

The Texas A&M Foundation is a nonprofit organization that unites generosity and vision to raise and manage major endowed gifts that support the future of Texas A&M University. For additional information and for photographs, please contact Dunae Crenwelge at dcrenwelge@txamfoundation.com or (979) 845-7461.

“Lead by Example” Campaign

Launched in 2015, Texas A&M University’s third comprehensive fundraising campaign, “Lead by Example,” is a joint effort between Texas A&M and its affiliate organizations: the Texas A&M Foundation, The Association of Former Students, the 12th Man Foundation and the George Bush Presidential Library Foundation. With a goal of reaching $4 billion by 2020, it is the largest higher education campaign in Texas history and the third largest conducted nationally by a public university. The campaign will generate gifts in three major areas: Transformational Education; Discovery and Innovation; and Impact on the State, Nation and World.

For more information about the campaign, visit leadbyexample.tamu.edu.

 

Categories: Accounting, Alumni, Departments, Donors Corner, Faculty, Featured Stories, Former Students, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M

Mays recognized faculty, staff, and Ph.D. students at the Aug. 25 Faculty/Staff Meeting.

New Staff Colleagues: 

  • Emily Ponder, Executive Assistant I (ACCT)
  • Sarah Hooper, Academic Advisor I (UAO)
  • Bailey Urban, Program Coordinator (BUSP)
  • Kimberly Sutphen, Assistant Director (CED)
  • Andrew Vernon, Communications Specialist II (CRS)
  • Cassie Bell, Assistant Director of Development (DEANS)
  • Blake Parrish, Director of Marketing, Communications and Public Relations (DEANS, Marcomm)
  • Tom Rolicki, Digital Services Marketing Manager (DEANS, Marcomm)
  • Taylor Stephens, Communications Specialist (DEANS, Marcomm)
  • Karen Lepley, Assistant Director (EMBA)
  • Alden DeMoss, Graphic Designer I (REC)

…Read more

Categories: Faculty, Mays Business, News, Staff

Patients often exhibit hostage-like behaviors when dealing with their medical caregivers – underplaying serious symptoms, reluctant to ask questions, and fearful to express concerns about treatments – says Leonard Berry, a marketing professor from Mays Business School at Texas A&M University.

The trend is so prevalent, Berry and his three co-authors titled their paper in the September 2017 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings: “When Patients and Their Families Feel Like Hostages to Health Care.”

“Patients and families often hold back from openly engaging clinicians in the thorough discussions that true shared decision making requires,” Berry explains. “We refer to this phenomenon as ‘hostage bargaining syndrome’ (HBS) because, in the presence of clinicians, patients and their families may behave like hostages negotiating, from a position of fear and confusion, for their health.”

HBS is most likely to occur in cases of serious illness.

Clinicians are unlikely to want their patients to feel like hostages, and many will actively encourage the patient’s involvement in shared decision-making. They encourage respect and collaboration in health-care scenarios.

In a video of Berry, he describes the phenomenon of HBS, offers clinical vignettes to clinicians to assist them with identifying it, and emphasizes the value of fostering shared decision-making with patients in their care.

Berry is a Regents’ Professor at Texas A&M University, a Senior Fellow at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, and a University Distinguished Professor of Marketing at Texas A&M.

Berry is the lead author of the paper. His co-authors are Tracey S. Danaher, a marketing professor at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia; Dan Beckham, president of The Beckham Company; Dr. Rana L.A. Awdish, director of the Pulmonary Hypertension Program and medical director of Care Experience at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit; and Dr. Kedar S. Mate, senior vice president of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement in Cambridge, Mass.

Categories: Faculty, Featured Stories, Health Care, Mays Business, News, Research, Texas A&M