Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship | Mays Impacts

Any Texas A&M University student interested in entering the annual Raymond Ideas Challenge can attend a workshop on Wednesday (March 5) in Wehner 190 and Thursday (March 6) in Rudder 302. Both will be from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

All students from across campus are encouraged to participate in the challenge by dreaming up the next great product or service and submitting their “big idea” in a written essay and two-minute video pitch.

The competition entry deadline is Friday, March 21, and the event is on April 30.  The host is Texas A&M’s Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship, which is at Mays Business School.

The Raymond Ideas Challenge is designed to foster an entrepreneurial mindset in Texas A&M students.

The students’  concepts will be presented to panels of judges from the business and academic community, who will challenge the students with questions. Students receive valuable experience developing business concepts and improving their writing and presentation skills. The competition also provides networking opportunities with the judges.

New this year is an online voting system, which will be used to select recipients of of $1,000, $500 and $250 prizes.

Assistance is needed in screening entries, and the opportunity is open to anyone in the community. If interested, contact Shanna Spencer at 979-845-0619 or sspencer@mays.tamu.edu.

For more information on the Raymond Ideas Challenge, go to tx.ag/ideasvideo or visit cnve.tamu.edu/programs/ideas-challenge.

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Centers, Programs, Students, Texas A&M

MBA Venture Challenge
MBA Venture Challenge

In the 2014 MBA Venture Challenge, more than 100 business and academic leaders from around the Brazos Valley judged companies created by the MBA students at Texas A&M University. The judges ranked early-stage startup companies and provided valuable feedback.

Taking first place in the competition were Janette Barnard, Matt Johnson, Lloyd McGuire and Robyn Peters, with “MyHeroClassifieds.com.” Their prize was sponsored by AT&T.

The second-place winners were Joseph Cole, Ben Feldman, Aiden Johnson, Ankit Talwar, Sabrina Wade with “Loco Inc.” Their prize was sponsored by Aggie Angel Network.

The third-place winners were Benjamin Holler, Shaune Kolber, Eric Piskura, Eric Snowder and Rachel Turner, with “Scepter Medical Devices.” Their prize was sponsored by JBKnowledge.

New to the competition this year was an Elevator Pitch Round.

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Centers, Departments, Featured Stories, Programs, Students, Texas A&M

Nick Brennan and Will Sames of Aggi3D
Nick Brennan and Will Sames of Aggi3D

From shorts complete with built-in fanny pack to an affordable 3D printer, Aggies are coming up with new ideas and Texas A&M University encourages their ingenuity both through education and practice. One example is the university’s first-ever elevator pitch competition, a fun and fast-paced contest where students pitched their business startups to a panel of expert investors who judged which businesses would take home a variety of cash prizes, and a Grand Prize trip to pitch to investors in Silicon Valley.

In the business world, the term “elevator pitch” is used to describe a brief summary that explains an idea for a product, service or project in the short time it takes for an elevator ride, say 30-60 seconds.

Organized by Startup Aggieland, the university’s student-run business accelerator, the elevator pitch competition was sponsored by Silicon Valley Bank and hosted by Chris Westfall, the 2011 National Elevator Pitch Competition winner and coach for the ABC television show “Shark Tank.”

“In business, whoever tells the best story wins,” Westfall told the crowd at Rudder Theatre. Westfall, a former Hollywood stuntman, went on to describe how he made his business dreams come true by “going from the green room to the boardroom. As I changed my story, I was able to change my results.”

Special guest, former Texas A&M and NFL football player-turned-serial entrepreneur, Chris Valletta ’01, welcomed Aggie student entrepreneurs to pitch their startup ideas to a panel of experts that included high-level business executives, several of whom are former Texas A&M students.

One-by-one student teams pitched their ideas, often bringing their products on stage for display.

The grand prize-winning team was Aggi3D, founded by nuclear engineering Ph.D. candidate Will Sames and Master’s in electrical engineering student Nick Brennan. Both earned their bachelor’s degrees at Texas A&M and are working to launch their idea for an inexpensive, tabletop 3D printer that creates metal machine parts such as drill bits.

Often compared to the replicator on “Star Trek,” 3D printers are being used to create everything from working guns, musical instruments, toys and food to, maybe someday, replacement body parts. The machines work like two-dimensional printers, but instead of printing with ink, 3D printers create three-dimensional objects by layering sheets of material such as plastic or wood, or in the case of Aggi3D − metal.

Sames, who is from San Antonio, and Brennan of Shoreline, Wash., met as freshmen at Texas A&M and together took an interest in 3D printing technology. They noticed that the 3D printers available at reasonable costs to ordinary people all printed exclusively in plastic and often had quality and reliability issues.

“We came to the realization that there are no inexpensive metal printers on the market,” says Brennan. “The cheapest metal printing systems cost upwards of $500,000. When Will first suggested we try to build our own inexpensive metal 3D printer, I was a bit dubious, but as we investigated the technology further, it seemed more and more achievable.”

The team is currently working on a prototype and hopes to have a beta model ready in less than a year. “Our plan is to launch on a crowd-funding site like KickStarter with a fairly simple design and get it into the hands of hobbyists, enthusiasts and educators,” Brennan notes. “We hope to use revenue from this launch to fund the development of a much slicker, plug-and-play printer we can then use to target the mass market.”

As the grand prize winners, Sames and Brennan will be treated this summer to an expenses-paid trip to Silicon Valley, Calif., sponsored by Silicon Valley Financial Group. There they hope to further develop their business plan, set goals for product release and pitch for funding.

The first-place winner at the competition was Notequill, a software startup pitched by its CEO, computer science major Graham Leslie. Notequill is a software program that allows students to take notes, typed or handwritten, on a variety of devices and stores the information online in “the cloud” where classmates can share and contribute, and where documents, photos and files can never be lost. “We are bringing the Notequill platform to school districts to improve the ease of learning in their new “bring your own technology’ programs for students and teachers,” Leslie adds.

If you thought fanny packs were a thing of the past, senior finance major Kyler Ferris begs to differ. He placed second for his startup idea called Chutes Shorts which are shorts made out of a fast-drying, parachute-like fabric that feature an insertable, waterproof pouch to hold personal items.

And third place at the competition was awarded to university studies major Brian Lamb whose mission to provide clean water to people around the world has resulted in a not-for-profit bottled water organization called Replenish. For every bottle sold, the organization donates a water purification tablet that provides an individual with a liter of clean water. For every case sold, the organization donates a “life straw,” a portable filter that is worn like a necklace and can purify enough water to last a person three years. “Rather than donating water so that people are dependent, we give them the resources to clean the water they already have,” Lamb notes.

The winning teams, along with all the other competitors, are entrepreneurs-in-residence at Startup Aggieland, located in Texas A&M’s Research Park. Open to any Texas A&M student operating a business, with a strong business idea or who is simply curious about entrepreneurship, Startup Aggieland provides free business resources including workspace, mentoring and networking opportunities. A seed fund is available and every startup receives $24,000 in web hosting. Visit startupaggieland.tamu.edu to learn more and find out when the 2014 elevator pitch competition will occur.

Event coordinators included the Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship at Mays Business School. Prior to the competition, the student teams presented their pitches to members of the Aggie 100, an organization that recognizes and celebrates the 100 fastest growing Aggie-owned or Aggie-led businesses in the world.

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Centers, Former Students, Students, Texas A&M

Aggie 100

Texas A&M University is churning out some of the nation’s best and brightest business leaders. On Oct. 25, Mays Business School’s Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship at Texas A&M University announced the recipients of the 9th Annual Aggie 100, honoring the fastest growing Aggie-owned or Aggie-led businesses in the world.

From the nation’s leading energy firms based in Houston to digital empires like Roku out of Satatoga, Calif., Texas A&M’s Aggies are transforming the way we do business and impacting Americans day-to-day. Honoree JBKnowledge recently released a new Augmented Reality App for the commercial construction industry that garnered international interest for its unprecedented visualization of build projects. Leftfield Pictures, based in New York, N.Y., has been a major unscripted player since 2009 when it launched the History Channel breakout “Pawn Stars,” which brought record ratings and several spinoffs. The stories of entrepreneurial spirit and success continue with each of these Aggie 100 honorees who live it every day.

“Our Aggie 100 honorees demonstrate that the character and traditions developed at our great university continue to play a significant role in their success across industries and generations,” said Richard H. Lester, Executive Director of the Mays Business School’s Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship. “Aggie leaders have proven time and time again that no matter the situation, solid business ideas, strong character, tenacity, and hard work pay off.”

For the full list of recipients, go to cnve.tamu.edu.

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Centers, Featured Stories, Texas A&M

3 Day Startup (3DS)
3 Day Startup (3DS)

Students from across the Texas A&M campus will have the opportunity to see if they have what it takes to form their own tech-based company. The catch: they only have three days.

3 Day Startup (3DS) is an accelerated hands-on program for passionate students with an entrepreneurial drive. The philosophy behind 3DS is “learning by doing.” The program recognizes that students need more than great ideas to launch a successful business. Over one weekend, 40 students will be equipped with resources, tools and real-world knowledge that will help them transform business concepts into functional and sustainable companies.

Mays Business School’s Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship (CNVE) will host 3DS Aggieland, a locally organized 3DS event founded in 2012. Applications for 3DS are due Sunday, Oct. 13. The event will take place Friday, Nov. 15 through Sunday, Nov. 17 at Startup Aggieland, located in the Texas A&M University Research Park.

On the first day of the event, students will participate in a brainstorming session to identify the best ideas for a software startup. As part of this effort, they will have the opportunity to consult with top-notch entrepreneurs, investors and professors.

Participants will also experience designing and creating business models, contacting potential customers, creating prototypes and developing both professional and personal relationships.

On the final day, students will present an investor pitch along with a minimal prototype. These final project pitches will be open to the public and will take place in the Cocanougher Center at Mays.

“There are two primary outcomes of 3DS—both of which will significantly enhance a student’s knowledge base,” says Richard Lester, clinical associate professor and executive director of the CNVE. “First, participants will learn the process of launching a new venture and the team dynamics needed to pull it off. Second, there is a distinct possibility that by Sunday night the student team will actually have a new venture that could attract venture capital or angel funding.”

For more information, visit tamu.3daystartup.org or visit 3DS Aggieland’s Facebook page at facebook.com/3DayStartupTAMU.

3 Day Startup (3DS)

3 Day Startup (3DS)

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Centers, Faculty, Programs, Staff, Students, Texas A&M

EBV Class of 2013
EBV Class of 2013

United States Army (Ret) Staff Sergeant Shilo H. Harris spent a recent Saturday evening in Aggieland, explaining to a group of two dozen disabled veterans how a Texas A&M University program helped him get his life back on track following a 2007 improvised-explosive device attack in Iraq.

Harris, who spent 48 days in a coma and underwent roughly 50 surgeries, was the keynote speaker at the July 27 opening ceremony for the sixth annual Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities, hosted by the Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship in partnership with the Center for Executive Development and Mays Business School.

“It changed my life in so many ways,” said Harris, who was presented with the 2013 Robin ’76 and Robert Starnes ’72 EBV Outstanding Alumni Award. “It changed my family, my professional career and my outlook on life. When I finished the EBV program, I left like an Aggie graduate.”

The EBV initiative offers cutting-edge training in entrepreneurship and small business management to soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines disabled as a result of their service. The intent of the EBV is to open the door to entrepreneurial opportunity and small business ownership by developing competencies associated with creating and sustaining an entrepreneurial venture and helping coordinate efforts with programs and services for veterans and others with disabilities. The program consists of a three-week online self-study, a nine-day residency period on the Texas A&M campus, and a year of mentorship and support as participants launch their new ventures.

Opening remarks for the event, held in the lobby of Texas A&M’s Clayton W. Williams Jr. Alumni Center, were provided by Jerry Strawser, Dean of Mays Business School. After welcoming the assembled crowd of honored guests, participants and sponsors, he announced to the EBV participants that they will learn how to become entrepreneurs. Strawser explained how participants have become leaders through the EBV program. “You will be learning the best, here at Texas A&M,” he said.

Dr. Richard Lester, CNVE director, introduced the participants, who each had the opportunity to speak about their branch of military service, hometown and the type of business he or she would like to begin — visions that ranged from real estate to music consulting.

In presenting his namesake award, Robert Starnes ’72 called Harris a “truly remarkable man and a contributor to the entrepreneur spirit.” Harris, now a motivational speaker, has worked with Congress to assist disabled veterans, raised $1.5 million dollars to have homes rebuilt for veterans and appeared on a recent episode of “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition.” Starnes said Harris “is a national ambassador to veterans throughout the United States.”

In accepting his award, Harris said he was truly honored and felt like he was back home. Harris explained how the fear on 9/11 prompted him into action to serve his country, noting that he felt called to join the armed forced because he was raised by a family of veterans. His faith also played a major role in his recovery, he said. Harris and his wife, Katheryn, reside in San Antonio, Texas where he is actively involved in supporting veterans and giving them resources to succeed in life.

Harris said the EVB Program opened up new possibilities for him. “Everybody needs to be open to new ideas,” he said. “If you are open and listen to new ideas, you can add those ideas to your original plan. We all share ideas and with all the participants here tonight, it soon becomes personal. It is a good way to keep in touch.”

For more information on the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans with Disabilities or other Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship activities, visit http://ebv.tamu.edu.

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Centers, Featured Stories, Texas A&M

Shilo Harris and family
Shilo Harris and family

A 2011 graduate of the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp for Veterans (EBV) will serve as the keynote speaker Saturday night for the program at Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School.

Shilo A. Harris began his public speaking career after completing the boot camp, and is writing a book, Steel Will, with a contact he met while he was in the program. He and his family received a house through ABC’s “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition and Helping a Hero” in 2012.

The EBV offers training in entrepreneurship and small business management to post-9/11 veterans with disabilities resulting from their service to our country.  The EBV at Texas A&M is a collaboration between the Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship and the Center for Executive Development at Mays.

On Aug. 3, the participants will hear from an alumni panel, give their final venture pitches and participate in a closing reception. The speaker at the closing ceremony will be Frederick D. McClure of the George Bush Foundation.

Of this year’s 25 participants, eight are from out of state — Missouri, Florida, Georgia and Oklahoma. The Army, Marines, Navy and Air Force are all represented.

The cost is about $5,000 per participant, but corporate sponsors and private individuals provide funding so that the veterans are allowed to attend the entire program — including tuition, travel and accommodations — at no cost.

About the EBV

The EBV Consortium was formed in 2008 as a national educational initiative designed to help veterans with disabilities to make the transition to self-employment, develop professional networks and ultimately start and grow sustainable businesses. The EBV Consortium is composed of the Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University, the Anderson School of Management at the University of California, Los Angeles, the College of Business at The Florida State University, the Krannert School of Management at Purdue University, the College of Business at the University of Connecticut, the E. J. Ourso College of Business at Louisiana State University and the School of Hotel Administration at Cornell University.

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Centers, Former Students, Programs, Texas A&M

Frank Raymond has been a fan of Texas A&M University — and Mays Business School in particular — since Craig Brown ’75, his co-founder of Bray International, invited him several years ago to attend scholarship events Brown hosts. Brown has long been a supporter of Texas A&M and Mays, where he graduated and was named a Distinguished Alumnus in 2012.

Frank RaymondFrank Raymond

Soon Raymond began exploring ways to connect with Mays on his own, funding scholarships and serving as a judge for the Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship’s (CNVE) Ideas Challenge, in which students from across campus vie to pitch their proposals for products or services to a panel of judges. Raymond’s son, who shares his excitement about innovative ideas, typically joins him.

Now, Raymond and his wife Jean have created the Frank J. and Jean Raymond Foundation Ideas Challenge fund, committing to contributions of $50,000 per year for the next 20 years. These funds will support the Raymond Ideas Challenge and allow the CNVE to increase its impact on the entrepreneurial mindset of Texas A&M University students.

In addition to this gift, the Raymonds also provide scholarships for Mays students with an interest in entrepreneurship.

“Frank and Jean are true champions of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial thinking at Mays,” said Mays Dean Jerry Strawser. “Their generous support of our students and encouragement to have our students develop “great ideas’ will have an impact on their lives for many years to come.”

“You always hope what you’re doing will help these outstanding young people to be better students and that it will ease their burdens a little bit,” Frank Raymond said.

Raymond says he hopes his gifts will have another benefit to Mays: “I’m hoping to attract others to building on what I’ve done.”

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Donors Corner, Students, Texas A&M

An Aggie turned Houston businessman wanted to help students pursue their own entrepreneurial endeavors, so he and his wife created the Jennifer and Brian Lamb ’91 Entrepreneurship Excellence Fund.

Jennifer and Brian Lamb '91
Jennifer and Brian Lamb ’91

Distributions from the $100,000 endowment, funded through the Texas A&M Foundation, will be used to support the activities of the Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship (CNVE) at Mays Business School. The center’s vision is to produce and encourage entrepreneurs. Its activities are supported by corporate and individual partners.

Brian Lamb received his bachelor’s degree in management from Mays and has served on the CNVE’s advisory council since 2010. Both Brian and Jennifer have supported the CNVE financially since 2008.

Brian serves as president and Jennifer as Vice President of Administration at AXYS Industrial Solutions, Inc., a Houston-based company that re-purposes secondary products from industry and helps companies find new revenue streams while reducing disposal costs. Brian Lamb says the entrepreneurial approach aligns with the Companies philosophy and business ethic. “It’s just the way we do business and the way we think,” he says.

The Lambs say they wanted to honor Texas A&M while encouraging young people to pursue their dreams. “I tell young people to focus on the things they are good at and find solutions to problems in areas they can do something about. Find your passion, and your niche will show itself,” Brian Lamb explains.

“The Lambs are helping us work to create the next generation of entrepreneurs,” said Mays Dean Jerry Strawser. “Through their time and financial investment, they are providing us with the resources to help young people achieve their dreams and pursue their passions.”

The Lambs’ company was recognized as an honoree in the CNVE’s “Aggie 100” program that recognizes the fastest-growing Aggie-owned companies in 2009, 2010 and 2012.

About Mays Business School

Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School educates more than 5,000 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its undergraduate and MBA programs, and for faculty research. The mission of Mays Business School is creating knowledge and developing ethical leaders for a global society.

Categories: Donors Corner, Former Students

Representatives from thriving Aggie-owned companies gathered in The Zone at Texas A&M University Friday for the Aggie 100. The celebration sponsored by the Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship at Mays Business School began with a reception Thursday and lasted through lunch on Friday at the Zone Club.

Each year, the Aggie 100 program recognizes the 100 fastest-growing Aggie-owned or Aggie-led businesses in the world.
Each year, the Aggie 100 program recognizes the 100 fastest-growing Aggie-owned or Aggie-led businesses in the world.

The companies recognized this year reported a combined revenue of $18.2 billion — the highest in the eight years the program has existed. The top recipient was Navidad Resources, an independent oil and gas company founded in Tyler in 1992. It reported 206.14 percent growth. CEO and president Harold E. McGowen III ’82 said he was honored to be on the list with the other 99 companies. “You are some of the smartest and most capable people in the country,” he said. “These companies are created by men and women who inspire others to exceptional achievement.”

This year’s group included 40 newcomers, and eight of the recipients have been on the Aggie 100 list at least five times.

The key to the companies’ success is the entrepreneurial spirit, several of the speakers commented. “You people had the vision — in fact, the courage — to take some chances that most people wouldn’t take,” said Texas A&M President R. Bowen Loftin. “You’re here today because you were persistent and also successful. We applaud you. We think you embody the true spirit of Aggieland.”

Keynote speaker Dan Moran, an Aggie and former Marine whose Houston company funds veterans’ start-up companies, summed it up this way: “Aggie entrepreneurs never, ever, ever give up.” He called entrepreneurs ” the backbone of the economy… You’re going to get us back on track.”

The inaugural Summit Award, created to recognize the large-corporation Aggie 100 applicant with the highest average revenue, was given to Houston-based Oil States International. CEO Cindy B. Taylor ’84, who received a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Mays, said her company is approaching $4 billion in growth this year. Taylor, one of the 2011 Mays Outstanding Alumni, is the mother of three Texas A&M students.

About Aggie 100

The Aggie 100 identifies, recognizes and celebrates the 100 fastest growing Aggie-owned or Aggie-led businesses in the world. The Aggie 100 not only celebrates their success, it also provides a forum to pass lessons to the next generation of Aggie entrepreneurs.

One-of-a-kind at the college level, the Aggie 100 was created by Mays Business School’s Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship. The center provides encouragement, education, networking and assistance to entrepreneurially minded students, faculty and Texas businesses.

Each year, Aggie 100 honorees are invited to campus for celebrations that includes an evening networking reception with fellow honorees and special guests from Texas A&M University, speaking engagements with Texas A&M students, breakfast with the deans of their colleges and an awards luncheon where the rankings are announced.

To be considered for the Aggie 100 program, companies (corporations, partnerships, sole proprietorships) must have been in business for at least five years and have had verifiable revenues of $250,000 or more for calendar year 2009.

The full list of 2012 recipients is available at aggie100.com/Aggie100Archives/2012/2012List.

Categories: Centers, Featured Stories, Former Students, Texas A&M