WHU is a private business school in the Rheinland. With a student body of about 1,300 (smaller than my high school back home!) it seems to be an incubator for young entrepreneurs.  A year is broken up into four quarters, so I was there for two quarters in the spring. A course is usually about 6 lectures and one final exam, and the classes are spread out on random days of the professor’s choosing. The professors are often also professionals that teach on the side so the schedules are not as regular as at A&M. This also means that these sporadic classes are extremely long and loaded with information, so I am very grateful for the 15 minute break in the middle! On the bright side, my schedule allows for many 3 and 4 day weekends, so travelling shouldn’t be too difficult.

In my Strategic Management class with Professor Oetinger!

In my Strategic Management class with Professor Oetinger!

German students are amazingly well balanced in terms of school work and partying. The students at this small school sure like to go out and have a good time with friends, but they are also very dedicated to their work. It’s exciting to be in such a renowned business school, learning alongside students from around the world. I love this chance to see a common topic of study from so many varied perspectives.

View of Burgplatz, on campus

View of Burgplatz, on campus

With that said, there are definitely some differences when it comes to working in groups. When we meet in a study room to work on a project there is very little “small-talk.” It can be a good thing and a bad thing. True, we go straight to work and get things done, but I wouldn’t mind a little insight into their lives and perspectives. Also, I think it would be helpful for them to understand the educational background that I have and my personal study habits and skills.

Similar to the US, exam time is taken seriously. In fact, three to four weeks before finals, the bar and club begin to clear out and you even see less people on the street because everyone is holed up studying! And, of course, there’s never an empty table at the library.

And that’s all I can think of for classes and studies right now! Until next blog, auf Widersehen!!