Lead Story

Full-Time Texas A&M MBA named Top 10 Global “Value for Money” by Financial Times

Mays Business School, January 27th, 2020

The Full-Time MBA program at Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School has again been named a top program globally, according to the 2020 rankings released by Financial Times. Texas A&M Full-Time MBA ranks as the #19 public program in the U.S. and, overall, #86 globally.

In addition to the Top 20 public program in the U.S. ranking, Texas A&M Full-Time MBA ranks #10 globally in “Value for Money,” a score measuring salary, course length, tuition, and other costs, including opportunity cost.

“We are very student- and employer-centric, continuously tracking the skills the market wants, and are agile in implementing the changes needed to meet market demand,” shared Arvind Mahajan, Associate Dean for Graduate Programs. “Creating functional tracks, introducing significant data analytics content, enhancing international experiential learning opportunities, and creating a course for students to actually manage an annual national case competition are just some examples of our swift actions.”

Mahajan continued, “The rankings are a manifestation of the quality of the students we admit, the rigorous course content delivered by a deeply caring faculty, and the personalized service provided by our staff and the dedicated Career Management Center.”

Texas A&M’s Full-Time MBA program in College Station, TX is 18-months in duration, beginning in August of each year with a December graduation, and the degree includes the option to extend an additional semester for extra electives to match interest areas.

“As a professional who has worked outside the U.S. for years, I am thrilled to see the rising global prominence of this incredible program I have the honor of serving,” shared Richard Castleberry, Director of the Full-Time MBA program at Texas A&M University. “Our vision at Mays Business School is to advance the world’s prosperity and the students, faculty, and staff that make up this program are creating that level of impact through the discovery of themselves and the transformation that happens during their education at Texas A&M.”

“Congratulations to the faculty, staff, and students that comprise this Full-Time MBA program and the efforts each of them does to continually improve our program,” shared Eli Jones, Dean of Mays Business School. “Excellence is an Aggie core value that is routinely exhibited by every member of Mays. We are proud of the hard work and the well-deserved recognition received by this program.”

Applications for the Texas A&M Full-Time MBA program are being accepted now for the class of 2022. For more information, visit: https://mays.tamu.edu/full-time-mba/

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About Mays Business School

At Mays Business School, we strive to advance the world’s prosperity. Our mission is to be a vibrant learning organization that creates impactful knowledge and develops transformational leaders. Mays Business School educates more than 6,400 undergraduate, masters, and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing, and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its programs and for faculty research.

For more information

Visit: https://mays.tamu.edu/

Contact Blake Parrish, Director of Marketing, Communications, and Public Relations: 979-845-0193

The Full-Time MBA program at Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School has again been named a top program globally, according to the 2020 rankings released by Financial Times. Texas A&M Full-Time MBA ranks as the #19 public program in the U.S. and, overall, #86 globally.

In addition to the Top 20 public program in the U.S. ranking, Texas A&M Full-Time MBA ranks #10 globally in “Value for Money,” a score measuring salary, course length, tuition, and other costs, including opportunity cost.

“We are very student- and employer-centric, continuously tracking the skills the market wants, and are agile in implementing the changes needed to meet market demand,” shared Arvind Mahajan, Associate Dean for Graduate Programs. “Creating functional tracks, introducing significant data analytics content, enhancing international experiential learning opportunities, and creating a course for students to actually manage an annual national case competition are just some examples of our swift actions.”

Mahajan continued, “The rankings are a manifestation of the quality of the students we admit, the rigorous course content delivered by a deeply caring faculty, and the personalized service provided by our staff and the dedicated Career Management Center.”

Texas A&M’s Full-Time MBA program in College Station, TX is 18-months in duration, beginning in August of each year with a December graduation, and the degree includes the option to extend an additional semester for extra electives to match interest areas.

“As a professional who has worked outside the U.S. for years, I am thrilled to see the rising global prominence of this incredible program I have the honor of serving,” shared Richard Castleberry, Director of the Full-Time MBA program at Texas A&M University. “Our vision at Mays Business School is to advance the world’s prosperity and the students, faculty, and staff that make up this program are creating that level of impact through the discovery of themselves and the transformation that happens during their education at Texas A&M.”

“Congratulations to the faculty, staff, and students that comprise this Full-Time MBA program and the efforts each of them does to continually improve our program,” shared Eli Jones, Dean of Mays Business School. “Excellence is an Aggie core value that is routinely exhibited by every member of Mays. We are proud of the hard work and the well-deserved recognition received by this program.”

Applications for the Texas A&M Full-Time MBA program are being accepted now for the class of 2022. For more information, visit: https://mays.tamu.edu/full-time-mba/

####

About Mays Business School

At Mays Business School, we strive to advance the world’s prosperity. Our mission is to be a vibrant learning organization that creates impactful knowledge and develops transformational leaders. Mays Business School educates more than 6,400 undergraduate, masters, and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing, and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its programs and for faculty research.

For more information

Visit: https://mays.tamu.edu/

Contact Blake Parrish, Director of Marketing, Communications, and Public Relations: 979-845-0193

Categories: Dean Eli Jones, Faculty, Featured Stories, Mays Business, MBA, News, Rankings, Staff, Students, Texas A&M

Mays Business School student LeAnn Percivill ’20, from Riesel, TX, was named the recipient of the Next Generation Scholarship at the sixth annual National Retail Federation (NRF) Foundation Honors on January 12, 2020, in New York City.

“I never envisioned winning the NRF Next Generation Scholarship. The second the recipient was announced and then I heard ‘From Texas A&M…’ – it truly felt like a movie,” said Percivill.

“Coming from a small town and deciding to pursue business as a career, I was concerned if my value of people and authentic empathy would be reciprocated in the industry I chose. When I discovered retail, I found so many influential industry leaders that had the same values and assured me that I was in the right place. Through NRF, I’ve learned that you have the power to truly make a difference for your community, the people you serve, the environment, and the company you work for.”

The $25,000 Next Generation Scholarship was created to prepare students for a career in retail and highlight the next generation of industry leaders and is considered the top achievement for undergraduates in retail.

Over 35 NRF Foundation member institutions participated in the competition. Percivill was one of five finalists selected from across the country and became the first student from Texas A&M University to receive this honor. Finalists from Texas A&M in past years have included: Allie Miller ‘14, Grace Dusek ‘16, and Manu Garikipati ‘20. Semi-finalists included Tess Williamson ’17 and Alyssa McKinzie ’17. Faith Knox ’20, of Austin, TX, also finished as a semi-finalist this year.

Each finalist is chosen based on experience in the retail industry, displayed leadership capabilities, and passion for making an impact in retail. Students traveled to New York City in October for final interviews with judges, and also spent time sharing their personal stories at YouTube Space studio.

As a Mays Business School student in the Center for Retailing Studies (CRS), Percivill is a member of the M.B. Zale Leadership Scholar program and has served this academic year as President of the Student Retailing Association. She spent summer 2019 as an intern with H-E-B at their corporate office in San Antonio, in addition to putting herself through school part-time as a student worker with CRS and Wayfair.

“I first met LeAnn as a freshman. She visited with me in my office to learn more about CRS, our program, and opportunities within the retail industry. Since then, she dove in head-first, taking advantage of every opportunity made available to her,” said CRS Assistant Director Lauren Osborne.

“She is a leader in her classes and maintains a stellar GPA,” Osborne added. “All while working and putting herself through school. The retail industry’s future is bright with leaders like LeAnn.”

Percivill will graduate in May 2020, and begin a full-time position with H-E-B as an Assistant Buyer for General Merchandise in June.

“I was terrified to go to college and take a chance of accumulating mounds of debt in hopes that I could pay it off someday with a career I’d be proud of,” Percivill explained.

“I took that chance, and it led me through the doors of the Center for Retailing Studies at Texas A&M and ultimately to NRF, where I now find myself with an incredible job waiting for me with H-E-B post-graduation – and no student debt. No dream is ever too big, I am a testament to that.”


About the Center for Retailing Studies

Since opening in 1983, the Center for Retailing Studies has been respected throughout the world as a leading source of industry knowledge and a pipeline for developing future retail leaders. In collaboration with the outstanding performance of the faculty at Mays Business School and excellence in student education programs, each year, more than 150 students complete coursework, internships, and leadership programs that prepare them for a professional career within the industry in-store management, buying, merchandising, planning, business analytics, and supply chain.

Connect with us: @TAMURetail
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About Mays Business School

At Mays Business School, we strive to advance the world’s prosperity. Our mission is to be a vibrant learning organization that creates impactful knowledge and develops transformational leaders. Mays Business School educates more than 6,400 undergraduate, masters, and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing, and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its programs and for faculty research.

Categories: Center for Retailing Studies, Marketing, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Mays Business School Team Named Regional Winner of Deloitte’s Audit Innovation Campus Challenge 

Students advance to national innovation competition to take place in April 2020

 

Dallas, Texas  — The six-member student team from Mays Business School was named as one of two regional winners of Deloitte’s Audit Innovation Campus Challenge (AICC). Teams representing 50 colleges and universities across the country participated in the regional competitions Nov. 21 and 22 in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles and Minneapolis.

Hosted by the Deloitte Foundation and Deloitte’s audit innovation and talent acquisition groups, the AICC is a nationally driven program that accelerates innovation in education by helping both students and educators keep pace with the rapidly changing marketplace and evolving technologies. The AICC program engages students and faculty from campuses across the country, providing an educational experience designed to help students develop skills for success in professional services and share the culture of innovation at Deloitte with academia and the talent of the future.

Mays Business School had five weeks to respond to a challenge statement released in October. The six-person team, supported by a Deloitte adviser, innovation subject matter leaders from Deloitte’s Audit & Assurance services practice, and faculty adviser, presented its response to a panel of Deloitte judges in [INSERT CITY] and was declared one of two regional winners. The students from the finalist teams each received a cash award.

Twelve teams total will advance to the finals and compete at the 2019 National Audit Innovation Campus Challenge April 4, 2020, at Deloitte University in Westlake, Texas. The national competition grand prize is $10,000 for the first-place school and $2,000 for each student on that team, $5,000 for the second-place school and $1,000 per student, and $2,500 for the third-place school and $500 per student.

Last year, the University of South Carolina was awarded first place for its idea to develop and streamline an active user validation assurance process for social media, e-commerce, streaming, and network applications.

About Mays Business School

At Mays Business School, we step up to advance the world’s prosperity. Our mission is to be a vibrant learning organization that creates impactful knowledge and develops transformational leaders. Mays Business School educates more than 6,200 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its programs and for faculty research.

 

From left to right:  James Flagg; Marissa Miller (Deloitte); Paul Brittain, Carlie Aguilar; Jenna Donnelly; Diane Harrison; Kara Kennedy; Jay Nam; and Jeff Buhr (Deloitte).

 

About the Deloitte Foundation

Deloitte Foundation, founded in 1928, is a not-for-profit organization that supports education in the U.S. through a variety of initiatives that help develop the talent of the future and their influencers and promote excellence in teaching, research and curriculum innovation. The Foundation sponsors an array of national programs relevant to a variety of professional services, benefiting middle/high school students, undergraduates, graduate students, and educators. Learn more about the Deloitte Foundation.

 

About Deloitte

Deloitte provides industry-leading audit, consulting, tax and advisory services to many of the world’s most admired brands, including nearly 90% of the Fortune 500® and more than 5,000 private and middle-market companies. Our people work across the industry sectors that drive and shape today’s marketplace — delivering measurable and lasting results that help reinforce public trust in our capital markets, inspire clients to see challenges as opportunities to transform and thrive, and help lead the way toward a stronger economy and a healthy society. Deloitte is proud to be part of the largest global professional services network serving our clients in the markets that are most important to them. Our network of member firms spans more than 150 countries and territories. Learn how Deloitte’s more than 312,000 people worldwide make an impact that matters at www.deloitte.com.

 

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 Contacts

 

Kiri Isaac ‘14

Brand Content Writer

Mays Business School | Texas A&M University
979.845.3167

kisaac@mays.tamu.edu

 

Sofia Barbieri

Public Relations

Deloitte Services LP

+1 212 436-3073

sobarbieri@deloitte.com

Deloitte refers to one or more of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, a UK private company limited by guarantee (“DTTL”), its network of member firms, and their related entities. DTTL and each of its member firms are legally separate and independent entities. DTTL (also referred to as “Deloitte Global”) does not provide services to clients. In the United States, Deloitte refers to one or more of the US member firms of DTTL, their related entities that operate using the “Deloitte” name in the United States and their respective affiliates. Certain services may not be available to attest clients under the rules and regulations of public accounting. Please see www.deloitte.com/about to learn more about our global network of member firms.

Categories: Uncategorized

Courtesy: Alyssa Powell/Business Insider

Black Friday and Cyber Monday are around the corner. So, what should we expect from this year’s holiday retail shopping season and the Thanksgiving period? Similar to the past few years, this year will also be a blockbuster holiday season. Retail holiday sales will be a substantial chunk of the expected 2019 retail sales of $5.5 trillion. The National Retail Federation (NRF) predicts retail holiday sales to grow by about (3.8-4.2)% to $730 billion. e-Marketer and Deloitte Consulting are even more optimistic, pegging expected holiday sales at $1.0 and $1.1 trillion, respectively, growing by (3.8-5.0)%. Holiday e-commerce sales are anticipated to range from $144 to $149 billion (Deloitte Consulting). But returns will also likely be higher this year at almost 39% (Tinuiti).

The expected higher holiday sales this year is remarkable given that the holiday season is shorter than the past few years because of the late occurrence of Thanksgiving. Nevertheless, a record number of about 165 million people are expected to shop during the Thanksgiving period. 114.6 million shoppers plan to shop on Black Friday, while 68.7 million intend to shop on Cyber Monday (NRF). However, the average spending per shopper will likely be $313, down from $335 last year (NRF). But more than a quarter of the shoppers are likely to spend over $500 (Tinuiti). Cyber Monday sales will continue to outstrip Black Friday sales this year and may touch a record $9.5 billion.

Amid the expectation of this upbeat sale, the most interesting trend is how shopper habits are changing. The number of shoppers likely to start shopping in stores (47%) and online (41%) are comparable (NRF). Surprisingly, brick-and-mortar stores are popular across age cohorts, including Gen Z. Shoppers expect retailers to be omnichannel, with more than two-fifths of them planning to buy online and pick up in-stores (Tinuiti).

Academy, Costco, Ikea, Lowe’s, Nordstrom, and Sam’s Club remain closed on Thanksgiving day. But two major retailers, Bed Bath & Beyond and GameStop, have reversed their course from past years and will open on Thanksgiving day. These retailers may want to cash in on more people wanting to shop on Thanksgiving day this year (58%) than the previous year (45%) (MiQ).

What items are likely to be hot during the Thanksgiving weekend and how are shoppers going to get their holiday gift ideas and deals? As always, the iPhone is a coveted item. Nintendo Switch Lite, Sony PlayStation PS4, Amazon Echo Buds, and Apple’s Airpods Pro and Airpods will be popular. All shoppers will be on the lookout for the best gifts to buy for their loved ones. Millennials are twice as likely to learn about holiday gifts from social media than baby boomers and Gen X’ers (Qualtrics).

What are the best days for getting the best deals and on which items? The hot deals will be on the day before Thanksgiving for apparel, Thanksgiving day for jewelry, appliances, computers, tablets, TVs, and sporting goods, Black Friday for X-mas décor, devices, kitchen items, and other expensive items, Cyber Monday for gadgets and toys, and Giving Tuesday for furniture and bedding.

The Thanksgiving shopping experience is becoming almost a weeklong affair. There is something exciting for everyone every day. Whether you are a touch-and-feel consumer at a physical store, a desktop clicker, a mobile shopper, or an omnichannel buyer, you have plenty of choices. If you are a retailer, there are ample opportunities to gain through omnichannel retailing. If you are an analyst and researcher like me, it is fun monitoring, analyzing and predicting shopping behavior and sales.

Categories: Uncategorized

SKYPaws, LLC, founded by Stephanie Young ’21 and Brianna Armstrong ’20, was awarded first place and $3,000 at the 2019 Raymond Ideas Challenge. The idea behind SKYPaws came to Young while she was working at a Veterinary Clinic in her hometown. “We had a dog named Charlie that came in for a routine procedure and passed away shortly after due to improper monitoring. The entire mission of SKYPaws is to equip Veterinarians with the accurate information that they need to know about their patients when they need it most” said Young.

Veterinary clinics must visually monitor patients post-operatively as animals will often chew through wires and tubing, or remove other monitoring devices. Unfortunately, this means that veterinarians and their staff don’t receive accurate information regarding a patient’s blood pressure, heart rate, and other vital signs that typically alert physicians of critical issues during recovery. SKYPaws provides veterinary clinics with a wireless monitor that provides them with accurate, real-time data to better monitor patient recovery. “Right now, SKYPaws is in the process of working with a professional engineering firm. This prize money will allow us to continue our discussions with them until we get Angel investment in the next 4-6 months” stated Young. Young encourages students who are interested in entrepreneurship to “take the plunge” and get involved with campus resources such as McFerrin Center, Startup Aggieland or Aggies Invent. “These resources will gradually allow you to get your feet wet in a structured way, so you don’t feel lost or helpless! Entrepreneurship is a major portion of my life and I feel as if my college experience would be lackluster without it” she added. Young is a sophomore Animal Sciences major and Armstrong is a 4th-year student in the Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine Professional Program. SKYPaws is a client of the Startup Aggieland Business Incubator.

Over 130 industry professionals judged this year’s 40 finalists. Recent Texas A&M graduate Rhett Bruck competed as a finalist at the 2018 Raymond Ideas Challenge and returned in 2019 as a judge. When asked why he decided to serve as a judge he commented on the impact that McFerrin Center programs had during his time at Texas A&M and his desire to help aspiring student entrepreneurs. “I thought it would be fun and I wanted to give back,” said Bruck “Startup Aggieland and the McFerrin Center put me on this amazing track where I can use the skills I developed everywhere.” The 2019 Raymond Ideas Challenge awarded $10,000 in prize money to student entrepreneurs at Texas A&M University. Second place winner Luke Raglin of SimpleSeat is the first Texas A&M Corpus Christi student to place at a Raymond Ideas Challenge. In addition, Axle Box Innovations has awarded all 40 finalists with access to their brand new “Fab Lab” that will open in January 2020. Raymond Ideas Challenge is held annually each fall semester. For more information visit mcferrin.tamu.edu.

2019 Raymond Ideas Challenge Winners

  • First Place: Brianna Armstrong, Stephanie Young; SKYPaws, LLC.
  • Second Place: Luke Raglin of Texas A&M Corpus Christi; SimpleSeat
  • Third Place: Shreedevi Arun Kumar, Kaivalya Deo; 3D Bio-Printed Pancreas

Best Video

  • Bruce Kelly, Stephen Lorenzen; Lit Seating

Honorable Mentions

  • Daniel De Clute-Melancon; Changing the World by Providing Local Access to Urban Air
  • Seth Polsley; Accessible Fitness Tracking for People with Disabilities or Injuries
  • Mary Chandra, Molly Coon, Elizabeth Matthews; G-Sense
  • Hassan Anifowose; Chronos 360
  • Nash Porter; Kisby Virtual Lifeguard

AXLE BOX Award

  • Nash Porter; Kisby Virtual Lifeguard

Categories: McFerrin Center for Entrepreneurship, Uncategorized

Venky Shankar, Coleman Chair Professor in Marketing and Director of Research, Center for Retail Studies (CRS), was recently invited as a Thought Leader at the Thought Leadership Conference hosted by the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. He worked with an expert team of academics and practitioners and made a presentation entitled “How Technology is Changing Retail.”

The presentation started with a typology, or classification, of technologies that are impacting retailing.  Shankar presented different theoretical frameworks for a better understanding of the role of technology in retail. He covered technology adoption by shoppers and retailers, and presented some interesting future scenarios and concluded with research questions for scholars to pursue.

Shankar covered a gamut of technologies starting with 5G telecommunication, augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), mixed reality (MR), Internet of Things (IoT), Blockchain, drones, robots, and 3D printing with many powered by artificial intelligence (AI), and how they are changing shopper experience and retailer business model. He discussed different organizations of technologies by stakeholder type (customer-facing, employee-facing, and supplier-facing), information technology (IT) versus non-IT, incremental versus radical, facilitating versus disruptive, and commoditizing versus value-adding. Among the drivers of retail technology adoption, his team identified advancement in core technology, consumer push, competitor innovation, and regulation as the main factors. His presentation highlighted customer and partner adoption, customer outcomes (e.g., satisfaction, purchase), supplier outcomes (e.g., on-time delivery) and financial outcomes (e.g., revenues, profits, shareholder value) as the key consequences of retail technology adoption.

From a retailer standpoint, Shankar discussed the “what, when and how” of technology adoption, management of technologies, and strategic versus tactical elements of technology. He presented different theories, including innovation adoption, technology acceptance, technology management, and option value theories.

Perhaps the most exciting part of the presentation was the articulation of possible future scenarios. Shankar presented his team’s ideas under four areas: retailer disintermediation, hybrid bundles, sharing economy, and retailer types. He speculated a scenario in which all consumables such as laundry for washers are replenished by AI in the machines directly ordering with the manufacturer and retailer becoming more of a repair agent—a possibility being tested by Proctor and Gamble. Another scenario he depicted involved consumers sharing or renting almost everything including, housing, clothing, and transportation. He discussed the near future possibility of, in addition to pervasive omnichannel retailing, smaller format stores for quick replenishment and instant gratification, stores that exclusively demonstrate new products, pop-up stores, repair stores, large experience stores, and community retail outlets, will start to dominate the landscape.

An article based on his presentation is being prepared and will be featured in a forthcoming special issue of the Journal of Retailing.

Categories: Uncategorized

College Station, TX – November 18, 2019 – The Executive MBA program (EMBA) at Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School was recognized as the #1 program in Texas, #5 program among public universities in the U.S. and #14 program nationwide according to the 2019 rankings released today by Financial Times.  In international standing, the Mays EMBA rose 19 positions to 77, up from 96th place in last years’ rankings.

Eli Jones, dean of Mays Business School, said he is extremely pleased the program has entered the top 15 in the U.S. “This is a well-deserved accomplishment for this program,” he said. “Julie Orzabal, Arvind Mahajan, and the entire graduate programs staff deliver a transformational education to our executives. As lifelong learners themselves, they enhance the experience for the executives we serve.”

Mays performed well in the 2019 Financial Times rankings in other areas, too. Based on research productivity in the top business journals, Mays faculty ranked #5 among U.S. public schools and #12 among U.S. overall schools. Mays EMBA graduates ranked 1st in “Work Experience,” 1st in “Career Progress,” and 2nd in “Salary” for U.S. public institutions.

For the second year, a measurement examining the number of hours of Corporate Social Responsibility taught in each program resulted in Mays EMBA Program ranking #6 in the U.S. Coursework dedicated to corporate compliance, governance, and ethics, in addition to an integrated focus on ethics throughout the curriculum, is a central part of Mays Strategic Mission and Vision for developing transformational leaders.

EMBA Program Director Julie Orzabal believes participants experience a journey of personal leadership development through discovery, transformation, and impact. “The success of our graduates, captured in these rankings, is at the core of our twenty years of success in Houston. We are proud of the national and international recognition this ranking symbolizes.”

Associate Dean for Graduate Programs Arvind Mahajan said, “Our location at CityCentre in Houston makes us centrally located for thousands of executives who want to expand their knowledge base. Our location and our success really entice that population and based on our elevation in rankings, it is paying off.”

The Executive MBA program at Mays Business School is a two-year program designed for experienced leaders that meets on alternate weekends in Houston, led by elite faculty experts at Mays who are renowned for their research and are passionate about teaching.

 

A new class begins July 2020. To join Mays EMBA Class of 2022, visit https://mays.tamu.edu/executive-mba/.

 

See the Financial Times full rankings here:  http://rankings.ft.com/businessschoolrankings/executive-mba-ranking-2019

Categories: Mays Business, MBA, Texas A&M

It is extraordinarily fitting that the 2019 Mays Scholarship Banquet was held in the Hall of Champions at Kyle Field. Everyone who attended the banquet is a champion in their own right. Whether the champion was a student blazing new trails for their friends and family or a champion for students to attend Mays Business School by giving their time, talent, and treasure, all 1,000+ people at the banquet were stalwart members of the Mays Family.

Dean Eli Jones ’82, the emcee for the night, noted how the banquet was hosted in a month ripe with gratitude. “November is a month synonymous with gratitude. While Thanksgiving is still two weeks away, tonight, we give thanks. We give thanks for the generous supporters of Mays who make a difference in the lives of students. We give thanks to the dedicated students of Mays, who will be our future leaders. Finally, we give thanks for the ability to gather this Mays family for an evening of thanksgiving.”

Keynote speaker David Shimek spoke about his gratitude to be there after his humble beginnings in a very small town. Shimek is now the Senior Vice President for Hardware Operations at Reynolds and Reynolds Company. He spoke about the Reynolds and Reynolds Sales Leadership Institute and how selling is a critical piece of their career. Shimek mentioned not just selling products, but themselves as well. To sell themselves, he gave them two responsibilities. The first, to be a good steward of their scholarship by striving for success and being involved in their school and community. The second responsibility was to give. To be a donor and give monetarily when the time is right, to give physically through mentoring programs, and to give corporately by championing for their future companies to give to Mays.

The night was full of exchanged handshakes and stories. Donors were able to spend time with their scholarship recipients, and students were given a chance to update some of their biggest champions on their activities and ambitions. Three students, in particular, shared stories with the banquet about their scholarships. However, rather than listing their numerous accolades, Hannah Grubbs ’20, Nicholas Menchaca ’20, and Gabrielle Orion ’20, shared stories of how the scholarships are about more than the money. The students told how scholarships grant students the ability to persevere through hardships and give them access to experiences and opportunities that would otherwise be impossible.

Grubbs shared how her family fell apart in her first semester of college, and her mom and brother moved across the state. Because of her scholarship, the money she earned from her part-time job could help her family move without the fear of not being able to pay for school. Also, because of the scholarships she received, she could move through school with urgency, not haste, as she uncovered her passions.

Menchaca told the audience how he was raised by a single father who worked hard. Despite his father’s best efforts, Menchaca grew up acquainted with financial insecurity and with a slim chance to attend a higher education institution. Menchaca said, “Financial insecurity is a towering barrier that consumes your every thought. Growing up, I didn’t have time to chase passions because I needed to help pay bills. These scholarships give students like me the ability to knock down those barriers and an opportunity to put education first.”

Orion spoke of the donor impact she’s felt. Her family was affected by Hurricane Harvey. For six months, her childhood home in Houston was unlivable, and she worried about her family and their mounting bills, but never once did she have to worry about pausing her education, because of the generous donors at Mays.

Grubbs wrapped up their time on stage imploring everyone to have the seemingly hard conversations about just how much scholarships mean to those receiving them. “For most of us in this room, the money you so graciously give back to our school allows us financial freedom from hardship both now and in the future. Your generosity gives us the freedom to find passion and pursue excellence. In that pursuit, we aim to someday sit in your chair as scholarship donors.”

Categories: Mays Business, Texas A&M, Uncategorized

(L to R) Heather Cox, Leah Kelly, Ozgur Cetinok, Erica Millwater, Arvind Mahajan
Images by Texas Filmworks

HOUSTON – Nov. 15, 2019 – The student team of Ozgur Cetinok, Leah Kelly, and Erica Millwater from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) has won the $30,000 First Place prize in the Humana-Mays Health Care Analytics 2019 Case Competition sponsored by health and well-being company Humana Inc. (NYSE: HUM) and Mays Business School at Texas A&M University.

Over 1,300 masters level students representing over 80 major universities in the U.S. registered for the national competition to compete for $52,500 in total prizes. The third annual competition was open to all accredited educational institutions based in the United States. Full-time and part-time master’s students from accredited Master of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Information Systems, Master of Public Health, Master of Business Administration programs, or other similar master’s programs in business, healthcare, or analytics, were eligible to enter.

Ozgur Cetinok, Leah Kelly, and Erica Millwater received the top prize following a presentation Thursday, Nov. 14 to an executive panel of judges at Texas A&M’s Mays Business School’s CityCentre Houston location. The Second Place prize of $15,000 was awarded to Saurabh Annadate and Tanya Tandon from Northwestern University, while the Third Place prize of $7,500 was presented to Hong Gao, Shuyu Wang and Jie Yang from New York University (NYU).

“This contest is an excellent way for students to practice their analytical skills on the current challenges we face in health care,” said Heather Cox, Chief Digital Health and Analytics Officer for Humana. “Their creativity and passion is impressive, and those qualities are exactly what we need as we continue to leverage technology to simplify health care for consumers.”

The analytics case received by the students was designed to be multi-faceted and complex, similar to a real-world business problem. This year’s competition focused on chronic pain and the treatment of this condition through long-term opioid therapy, which has increased dramatically over the past two decades. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as many as 1 in 4 patients receiving long-term opioid therapy in a primary care setting will struggle with opioid disorder. Using de-identified data, the students were asked to predict long-term opioid therapy post initial treatment. The goal is to identify patients at risk for continued long-term use of opioid therapies allowing for early intervention.

“Mays Business School is a model academic institution championing responsible research and teaching on every aspect of decision making in businesses. To that end, I am pleased that the students’ analyses will help Humana shape the way the industry delivers healthcare to alleviate the opioid epidemic,” says Arvind Mahajan, Associate Dean for Graduate Programs at Mays Business School. “This case study is an example of how students learn to apply their analytical skills to solve complex business problems which can have a social impact, and in this case, improve the lives of patients and their families.”

The teams were judged based on the following criteria:

  • Ability to establish key performance indicators aligned to business needs
  • Quantitative analysis identifying key business insights
  • Ability to provide unique insights for business improvements
  • Professionalism and visualization skills

This is the third year of the competition, which has grown to be one of the top healthcare analytics case competitions in country. In its inaugural year in 2017, the competition attracted more than 300 master’s degree candidates representing 109 teams from 19 major universities in the U.S.

For more information, visit HumanaTAMUAnalytics.com.

 

About Texas A&M’s Mays Business School

Mays is a full-service business school that steps up to advance the world’s prosperity. Our mission is to be a vibrant learning organization that creates impactful knowledge and develops transformational leaders. Mays Business School educates more than 6,400 undergraduate, master’s and doctoral students in accounting, finance, management, management information systems, marketing and supply chain management. Mays consistently ranks among the top public business schools in the country for its programs and for faculty research

About Humana

Humana Inc. (NYSE: HUM) is committed to helping our millions of medical and specialty members achieve their best health. Our successful history in care delivery and health plan administration is helping us create a new kind of integrated care with the power to improve health and well-being and lower costs. Our efforts are leading to a better quality of life for people with Medicare, families, individuals, military service personnel, and communities at large.

To accomplish that, we support physicians and other health care professionals as they work to deliver the right care in the right place for their patients, our members. Our range of clinical capabilities, resources and tools – such as in-home care, behavioral health, pharmacy services, data analytics and wellness solutions – combine to produce a simplified experience that makes health care easier to navigate and more effective.

More information regarding Humana is available to investors via the Investor Relations page of the company’s web site at www.humana.com, including copies of:

  • Annual reports to stockholders
  • Securities and Exchange Commission filings
  • Most recent investor conference presentations
  • Quarterly earnings news releases and conference calls
  • Calendar of events
  • Corporate Governance information

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Categories: Mays Business, Texas A&M

November 14, 2019 (College Station, Texas) – Texas A&M University has once again been recognized as a top university for both graduate and undergraduate students interested in entrepreneurship by the Princeton Review. For the third consecutive year, Texas A&M University ranks within the top 25 U.S. schools, coming in at #22 for Undergraduate students and #23 for Graduate students.

Texas A&M boasts a dynamic entrepreneurial ecosystem that includes the McFerrin Center for Entrepreneurship, which operates Startup Aggieland and Blackstone Launchpad powered by Techstars. Blake Petty, Director of the McFerrin Center for Entrepreneurship stated, “We proudly acknowledge this recognition on behalf of the vibrant entrepreneurial community continuing to grow throughout Texas A&M. Our campus culture is rooted in developing students who want to change the world, and our recognition as a top 25 entrepreneurship program for 3 consecutive years proves we excel in this area.”

The McFerrin Center for Entrepreneurship is housed within Mays Business School but its resources and programs are available to all future, current, and former students of Texas A&M University. Dr. Eli Jones, Dean of Mays Business School commented, “We are excited to once again be recognized for the importance we place on entrepreneurial education at Texas A&M University. Entrepreneurship is a strategic pillar of the Mays Business School’s mission, and recognition of our excellence in both Graduate and Undergraduate programs speaks well to our emphasis.”

Specialized entrepreneurial programs are also offered through the Texas A&M Colleges of Engineering, Agriculture, Veterinary Medicine, Liberal Arts, Architecture, the School of Innovation and many other academic units across campus. Students at Texas A&M have a myriad of pathways to pursue entrepreneurship and innovation during their college careers.

More than 300 schools reported data about their entrepreneurship offerings to Princeton Review. Rankings are based on entrepreneurial curriculum, student, faculty and staff entrepreneurial ventures, extracurricular offerings, and scholarships and aid provided to students pursuing entrepreneurship.

Categories: Entrepreneurship, Mays Business, McFerrin Center for Entrepreneurship, Programs, Rankings, Texas A&M