As students prepared resume portfolios and brushed up on networking skills, Mays Business School welcomed the fall season by hosting its annual fall career fairs. Organized by the Center for Retailing Studies and the Business Student Council, these events provided students with four days of job searching and career building opportunities.

Career fairs sponsored by the Center for Retailing Studies and Business Student Council provided students with four days of job searching and career building opportunities.
Career fairs sponsored by the Center for Retailing Studies and Business Student Council provided students with four days of job searching and career building opportunities.

The Retailing Career Fair, held September 17, brought more than 40 well-known retailers to campus. Carissa Atkins, manager of college relations for Macy’s, explained that 70 percent of the company’s current management group came from career fair recruits who went through the Macy’s training program. “This is a huge way to recruit talent that will grow our company,” said Atkins. “Mays students really understand what business is looking for. They have high self-expectations and understand the need for professionalism and work experience.” Other big name firms in attendance included Target Corporation, Neiman Marcus, and Pepsi Bottling Group.

One week later, that same professionalism filled the halls of Wehner again as the Business Student Council hosted their annual fall career fair. Representatives from over 150 companies were on hand for the three-day networking event, held September 23-25. Hundreds of students took advantage of the opportunity to meet with some of business’ biggest names, including Shell Oil Company, Ernst & Young, and NASA’s Johnson Space Center.

“The career fair is a great way to get your feet wet, meet professional people, and build a plan for your future. It’s an incredible networking opportunity that every student should take advantage of,” said senior marketing major Stacie Wheiles ’09.

Both the Center for Retailing Studies and the Business Student Council were organizing the career fairs long before the start of the fall semester. Tyan Jacox, campus programs coordinator for the Center for Retailing Studies, explains that the student benefits that come from career fairs make the months of meticulous planning well worth it. “The Center for Retailing Studies and Mays Business School are united in the mission to give our students the best education and experiences possible to prepare for a career in the business world. Connecting our students with employers who value this preparation and provide opportunities for Aggies in the workplace is an important part of this mission,” said Jacox.